McArthur-Burney Falls

State Park - California

McArthur–Burney Falls Memorial State Park is the second oldest state park in the California State Parks system, located approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) north of Burney, California. The park offers camping, fishing, watersports, hiking and horseback riding facilities. The park is mainly known for the waterfall, Burney Falls, at the entrance of the park. Wildlife in the park includes bass, trout, Steller's jay, squirrels, woodpeckers, deer, and on rare occasion, black bear.

maps

Map of the Nobles Emigrant Trail section, part of the California National Historic Trail (NHT), located outside of Susanville, California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Nobles Emigrant Trail - Trail Map

Map of the Nobles Emigrant Trail section, part of the California National Historic Trail (NHT), located outside of Susanville, California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map 1a of the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Lassen National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Lassen MVUM - Map 1a 2011

Map 1a of the Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Lassen National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=455 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McArthur%E2%80%93Burney_Falls_Memorial_State_Park McArthur–Burney Falls Memorial State Park is the second oldest state park in the California State Parks system, located approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) north of Burney, California. The park offers camping, fishing, watersports, hiking and horseback riding facilities. The park is mainly known for the waterfall, Burney Falls, at the entrance of the park. Wildlife in the park includes bass, trout, Steller's jay, squirrels, woodpeckers, deer, and on rare occasion, black bear.
McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. On a visit to the falls, an enthralled President Theodore Roosevelt pronounced them one of the wonders of the world. California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (530) 335-2777. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park 24898 Highway 89 Burney, CA 96013 (530) 335-2777 © 2005 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) cArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park sits on the eastern edge of the Cascade Range, between majestic Mount Shasta and Lassen Peak. The park’s centerpiece is the thundering white-water falls on Burney Creek, augmented by the voluminous springs emanating from the basalt cliff face. On sunny days, the mist above the basin of blue water at the bottom of the falls is often alight with rainbow colors. In the fall, the pool reflects the rich hues of autumn leaves, while winter often brings a lacy array of tiny icicles to decorate the face of the cliff. The climate in this area 65 miles east of Redding is dictated by its predominantly mountainous topography. The park’s highest elevation is nearly 3,100 feet. Temperatures range from averages of 20 degrees in winter to more than 85 degrees during the drier summer months. Between November and March, rainfall averages nearly 28 inches. PARK HISTORY The first people of this region lived in small groups or “bands.” The band that lived near the falls and the creek that flows into the Pit River called themselves Ilmawi. Central to the band’s way of life, the Pit River provided an important range of activities, including fishing, gathering, and social and sacred uses. Today, the Ilmawi are among nearly a dozen culturally similar bands that comprise the Pit River Tribe. The name “Pit” refers to a traditional hunting method in which hunters dug deep pits to trap large game such as pronghorn, deer, and elk. Salmon and trout from the river were a vital part of the Pit River people’s diet. The surrounding lands provided small game, including squirrels, ducks, geese, sage hens, and quail. Acorns, bulbs, tubers, seeds, and grasses also grew in the region, while various trees, herbs, and mosses served medicinal needs. Fur trappers began to encroach on Pit River territory in the 1820s and ’30s. By the mid-1850s, European and American settlers were homesteading the Pit River bands’ lands. By the 1870s, many members of the Ilmawi and other bands had died from European diseases or been forcibly removed to the Round Valley Reservation in Mendocino County. However, the ties of the people to their land proved strong. Today, the Pit River Tribe continues to maintain spiritual and economic relationships with their ancestral lands. People honor their cultural identity by visiting ancestral sites; conducting traditional activities such as hunting, gathering, fishing, and ceremonies; and teaching traditional life skills to their children and grandchildren. Many descendants still look upon Burney Falls and the sapphire pool at its base as a sacred place. Tribal members also continue their role as caretakers of the land, at times partnering with California State Parks to carry out landmanagement practices. Image courtesy of the Meriam Library, CSU Chico M Drawing of Shasta Peak by Charles Wilkes Becoming a State Park Burney Falls was named after Samuel Burney of South Carolina, who died in the area in 1859. Several local features came to be named after Burney. John and Catherine McArthur arrived in the 1860s, purchased thousands of acres, and opened a mercantile store in the area. Over time, several family farms and the small settlement of Peck’s Bridge sprang up along the Pit River near the falls. Early pioneer Isaac Ray established a shortlived lumber mill above the falls, but the area was sparsely populated well into the 1900s. The nearby Pioneer Cemetery bears witness to some of the historic names associated with this part of California. In 1917 the newly formed Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) began buying up land and water rights in the area. Alarmed residents foresaw that PG&E, in the interests of providing more hydroelectric power, would dam the Pit River and destroy Burney Falls. Frank and Scott McArthur, sons of John and Catherine, purchased 160 acres surrounding the falls; in 1920 they deeded the property to the State, requesting only that it be named
Parque Estatal McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial Nuestra Misión La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. En una visita a las cascadas, un fascinado presidente Theodore Roosevelt las declaró una de las maravillas del mundo. California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (530) 335-2777. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, comuníquese con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park 24898 Highway 89 Burney, CA 96013 (530) 335-2777 © 2005 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) l Parque Estatal McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial está situado en el borde este de la Cordillera de las Cascadas, entre el majestuoso Monte Shasta y el Pico Lassen. La pieza central del parque son las estruendosas cascadas blancas en Burney Creek, las cuales aumentan gracias a los manantiales que emanan de la pared del acantilado de basalto. En los días soleados, la bruma sobre la cuenca de aguas azules del fondo de las cascadas a menudo se ilumina con los colores del arcoíris. En el otoño, el pozo refleja los matices ricos de las hojas de otoño, mientras que el invierno a menudo crea témpanos diminutos a semejanza del encaje que decoran la pared del acantilado. El clima en esta área, a 65 millas al este de Redding, lo impone su topografía predominantemente montañosa. La elevación más alta del parque es de casi 3,100 pies. Las temperaturas van desde 20 grados en invierno a más de 85 grados durante los meses más secos de verano. Entre noviembre y marzo, las lluvias promedian casi 28 pulgadas. HISTORIA DEL PARQUE Los primeros habitantes de esta región vivieron en grupos pequeños o “bandas”. Los miembros de la banda que vivía cerca de las cascadas y el arroyo que fluye hacia el Río Pit se llamaban a sí mismos Ilmawi. El modo de vida de la banda giraba en torno al Río Pit, el cual proporcionaba una amplia gama de actividades, que incluía la pesca, la recolección y usos sociales y sagrados. Actualmente, los Ilmawi están entre la casi docena de bandas culturalmente similares que componen la Tribu del Río Pit. El nombre “Pit” se refiere a un método tradicional de caza en el cual los cazadores cavaban fosas profundas para atrapar a las presas grandes como antílopes americanos, ciervos y alces. Los salmones y las truchas del río eran una parte vital de la dieta de los habitantes del Dibujo del Pico Shasta realizado por Charles Wilkes Río Pit. Las tierras circundantes proporcionaban caza menor, Actualmente, la Tribu del Río Pit continúa incluidas ardillas, patos, gansos, gallos de manteniendo las relaciones espirituales salvia y codornices. Las bellotas, bulbos, y económicas con sus tierras ancestrales. tubérculos, semillas y pastos también Las personas honran su identidad cultural crecían en la región, mientras que diversos visitando los sitios ancestrales; realizando árboles, hierbas y musgos cubrían las actividades tradicionales como la caza, necesidades medicinales. la recolección, la pesca y ceremonias; y Los cazadores de pieles comenzaron enseñando a sus hijos y nietos habilidades a invadir el territorio del Río Pit en las tradicionales para la vida. Muchos décadas de los veinte y treinta del siglo descendientes todavía ven las Cascadas de XIX. Para mediados de la década de los Burney y la piscina azul zafiro de su base cincuenta del siglo XIX, los colonos europeos como un lugar sagrado. y estadounidenses estaban construyendo Los miembros tribales también viviendas en las tierras de las bandas del Río continúan su rol como cuidadores de la Pit. Para la década de los setenta del siglo tierra y a veces se asocian con California XIX, muchos miembros de los Ilmawi y otras State Parks a fin de llevar a cabo prácticas bandas habían muerto de enfermedades de administración de la tierra. europeas o habían sido expulsados a la Conversión en parque estatal fuerza a la Reserva de Round Valley en el Condado de Mendocino. Las Cascadas de Burney recibieron su Sin embargo, los lazos de las personas nombre por Samuel Burney de Carolina con sus tierras demostraron ser fuertes. del Sur, quien murió en el área en 1859. Imagen cortesía de la Meriam Library, CSU Chico E Muchos elementos locales recibieron su nombre por Burney. John y Catherine McArthur llegaron en la década de los sesenta del siglo XIX, compraron miles de acres y abrieron una tienda mercantil en el área. Con el tiempo, muchas granjas
McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park 24898 Highway 89, Burney, CA 96013 • 530-335-2777 Welcome visitors! Our staff has put together the following information to help you have a safe and enjoyable visit at this park. If you have any further questions please ask any of the staff, and we will be happy to help you. PARK FEES are due and payable upon entry into the park. Fees include one vehicle and one legally towed vehicle or trailer. Extra vehicles will be charged a fee, with a maximum of three vehicles. OCCUPANCY: A maximum of eight people are allowed per family campsite. CABINS: 24 one- and two-bedroom cabins are available, by reservation, for four or six people respectively. Cabins come with a fire ring, outdoor table and outside space for a tent. VEHICLE PARKING: Park in designated parking only. Most campsites are designed to accommodate a maximum of three vehicles. For parking purposes, all trailers are considered vehicles. There is an additional charge for more than one motorized vehicle, and you may need to park them in the overflow lots. Call for additional information on the extra vehicle charge. CHECK-OUT TIME is noon. Please vacate your site by that time. Check-in time is 2 p.m. DOGS/PETS must be kept on a leash no longer than six feet and under control at all times. They are not permitted in buildings, on trails (except for the Pioneer Cemetery Trail) or on the beach. Dogs/pets must be confined to a vehicle or tent at night, and they cannot be left unattended at any time. FIRES AND FIREWOOD: Please be cautious when building fires—wildfire danger is especially high during the summer. Fires are allowed only in established fire rings or camp stoves. Do not build ground fires outside the fire rings or leave campfires unattended. Do not gather firewood in the park— the nutrients must be allowed to recycle back into the ecosystem. You may purchase firewood at the entrance station or in the campgrounds. SPEED LIMIT: Though the maximum speed limit is 15 mph, when pedestrians, bicyclists and children are present even 15 mph might be too fast. Use good judgement. QUIET HOURS are from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. To ensure an enjoyable experience for everyone, please do not disturb other campers, regardless of the time of day or night. NOISE: Radios and other sound-producing devices must not be audible beyond your immediate campsite, regardless of the time of day or night. GENERATORS: Engine-driven generators or other devices can be operated ONLY between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. BICYCLES are allowed only on paved roads or on the Pioneer Cemetery Trail. All other trails are closed to bicycles. Bicycle helmets must be worn at all times by riders under age 18. TRUCKS AND BOAT PASSENGERS: Passengers may not ride in the beds of pickup trucks (including those with camper shells) or in towed boats at any time except on the launch ramp. Discover the many states of California.TM CAMPING RESERVATIONS: You may make camping reservations by calling (800) 444-7275 (TTY 800-274-7275). To make online reservations, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov ALTERNATE FORMAT: This publication can be made available in alternate formats. Contact interp@parks.ca.gov or call (916) 654-2249. To Lake Britton 30 29 31 32 Rim Trail (to Lake Britton) 25 92 91 90/89 23 95 96 97 Your Site #: ___________ Pioneer Camp Road 80 79/78 98 100 108 99 109 106 107 76 101 110 103 77 102 105 111 104 112 113 114 e Lak 22 20 21 36 35 19 18 17 37 Rim Camp 15 16 40 38 41 39 14 42 13 45 52 12 46 47 48 50 43 44 53 51 49 11 54 10 55 56 9 57 58 60 59 2 3 8 61 Accessible 62 cabins 4 7 56 87 88 86 85 83 84 82 81 94 24 34 33 Burney Creek Trail (to Lake Britton) 93 115 124 125 126 127 71 69 67 Camp Rim o T To Pio ne er Ca m p Old Rim Ca mp R lls Fa Accessible Campsite Accessible Feature Boat Ramp Cabin 65 Campfire Center Campground To I-5 (55 miles) Dogs Allowed on Leash Firewood Sales Fishing 89 Food Services Foot Bridge d Hike/Bike Campsite Locked Gate Tra Parking il op Lo o Lo lls Fa Picnic Area il Tra Pa ci fic p # Accessible Trail Bicycle Trail 66 63 oa ee Trail 128 64 i LEGEND 72 70 68 n Pio 120 121 74 75 73 116 123 117 119 122 1 118 ra yT l 27 26 r C em et er 28 McArthur-Burney Falls Memorial State Park il ra tT es Cr Falls Overlook Burney Falls Group Picnic Area Ranger Station Visitor Center Restrooms RV Sanitation Entrance Station Showers Supplies To Hwy. 299 (6 miles) © 2014 California State Parks For emergencies call Swimming 9-1-1 View Point Waterfall

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