Mount Tamalpais

State Park - California

Mount Tamalpais State Park is located in Marin County, California. The primary feature of the park is the 2,571 feet (784 m) Mount Tamalpais. The park contains mostly redwood and oak forests. The mountain itself covers around 25,000 acres (100 km2). There are about 60 miles (97 km) of hiking trails, which are connected to a larger, 200 miles (320 km) network of trails in neighboring public lands. Muir Woods National Monument is surrounded by the state park. From the peak of the mountain, visitors can see up to 25 miles (40 km), in a view that encompasses San Francisco, most of the North and East Bay, and the Farallon Islands. Occasionally, the Sierra Nevada are visible, 125 miles (201 km) away.

maps

Official visitor map of the Northern area of Golden Gate National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Golden Gate - North

Official visitor map of the Northern area of Golden Gate National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Golden Gate National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Golden Gate - Overview

Official visitor map of Golden Gate National Recreation Area (NRA) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=471 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Tamalpais_State_Park Mount Tamalpais State Park is located in Marin County, California. The primary feature of the park is the 2,571 feet (784 m) Mount Tamalpais. The park contains mostly redwood and oak forests. The mountain itself covers around 25,000 acres (100 km2). There are about 60 miles (97 km) of hiking trails, which are connected to a larger, 200 miles (320 km) network of trails in neighboring public lands. Muir Woods National Monument is surrounded by the state park. From the peak of the mountain, visitors can see up to 25 miles (40 km), in a view that encompasses San Francisco, most of the North and East Bay, and the Farallon Islands. Occasionally, the Sierra Nevada are visible, 125 miles (201 km) away.
Mount Tamalpais State Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. The panorama from the 2,571-foot peak is breathtaking. On a clear day, view the Farallon Islands out to California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (415) 388-2070. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov ® SaveTheRedwoods.org/csp Mount Tamalpais State Park 801 Panoramic Highway Mill Valley, CA 94941 (415) 388-2070 · www.parks.ca.gov/mttamalpais © 2007 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) sea, the Marin County hills, Mount Diablo, San Francisco, and the hills and cities of the bay. N orth of San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, Mount Tamalpais State Park rises majestically from the heart of Marin County. Mount Tamalpais captures our attention with its sweeping hillsides cloaked with chaparral-covered ridges, grasslands, and oak woodlands. Deep canyons filled with solemn redwood groves intersect these ridges and slopes to create a diverse environment for a wide array of plant and animal species. The breathtaking panorama from Mount Tamalpais’s 2,571-foot peak includes the Farallon Islands 25 miles out to sea, the Marin County hills, San Francisco Bay, the East Bay, and Mount Diablo. Spring and summer temperatures are warm, with average highs in the 70s and 80s. Fall and winter can be cool, with temperatures in the 50s; fog is common. CULTURAL HISTORY Native People The Coast Miwok lived on or near Mount Tamalpais, staying near water sources throughout present-day Marin County. These Native Californians hunted small animals and deer, collected acorns, and gathered flora, marsh plants, and shellfish. They made baskets and clamshell disk beads, trading them for locally unobtainable resources, such as high-grade obsidian from Lake County tribes. The Coast Miwok had a rich culture and a complex and intricate language. However, their way of life changed soon after the arrival of Europeans. In 1770 two explorers, Captain Pedro Fages and Father Juan Crespí, named the mountain La Sierra de Nuestro Padre de San Francisco. This was later changed to the Miwok word tamalpais (tam-al-pie-us), which, roughly translated, means “bay mountain” or “coast mountain.” Mount Tamalpais Scenic Railway Residents of San Francisco, whose population exploded after the 1848 gold discovery, used Mount Tamalpais for recreational purposes. Trails were developed, and a wagon road was built to the top of the mountain in 1884. The Mount Tamalpais Scenic Railway, completed in 1896, carried visitors to the mountaintop and the Summit Tavern, a hotel and restaurant. The slope from Mill Valley to the summit was so steep that the railroad had to negotiate 281 curves, equivalent to 42 complete circles, billing itself as the “Crookedest Railroad in the World.” In the section known as the “Double Bow Knot,” the track paralleled itself five times within 200 yards. In 1907 the “gravity car” was designed to transport visitors from the top of the mountain to the redwood-filled canyon of Muir Woods. Requiring only gravity and a brake, open-air rail cars carried passengers down the mountain to Muir Woods at an exhilarating 12 mph. The railroad and gravity cars allowed sightseers to travel from Mill Valley to the summit, down to the Woods, and back to Mill Valley. The Scenic Railway’s famous gravity cars were popular until the advent of the automobile and the construction of Ridgecrest Boulevard in 1925. A gravity car replica is displayed at the Gravity Car Barn on East Peak. Conservation Efforts Over the years, millions have flocked to the mountain, affectionately called “Mount Tam,” to relish the spectacular views and hike its trails. Generations of Mount Tam enthusiasts have worked hard to protect the mountain and keep it open to the public. The oldest of these citizen groups is the Tamalpais Conservation Club, organized in 1912. In 1928 William Kent, an ardent Marin County conservationist, and his wife donated 200 acres of land in Steep Ravine to help create Mount Tamalpais State Park. The park was later enlarged through the efforts of several hiking clubs, led by the Tamalpais Conservation Club. These organizations orchestrated a grassroots campaign to purchase additional land for the state park. Gravity car on Mount Tam’s Scenic Railway, ca. 1900 THE STATE PARK TODAY Now one of the oldest and most popular units of the California State Park System, the park has grown to 6,300 acres. Complete
Mount Tamalpais State Park Nuestra Misión La misión de California State Parks es proporcionar apoyo para la salud, la inspiración y la educación de los ciudadanos de California al ayudar a preservar la extraordinaria diversidad biológica del estado, proteger sus más valiosos recursos naturales y culturales, y crear oportunidades para la recreación al aire libre de alta calidad. El panorama desde el pico de 2,571 pies es impresionante. En un día despejado, vea los Farallones mar adentro, California State Parks apoya la igualdad de acceso. Antes de llegar, los visitantes con discapacidades que necesiten asistencia deben comunicarse con el parque llamando al (415) 388-2070. Si necesita esta publicación en un formato alternativo, póngase en contacto con interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 Para obtener más información, llame al: (800) 777-0369 o (916) 653-6995, fuera de los EE. UU. o 711, servicio de teléfono de texto. www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ ® SaveTheRedwoods.org/csp Mount Tamalpais State Park 801 Panoramic Highway, Mill Valley, CA 94941 (415) 388-2070 · www.parks.ca.gov/mttamalpais © 2007 California State Parks (Rev. 2014) las montañas del Condado de Marin, el Monte Diablo, San Francisco, y las montañas y ciudades de la bahía. E l Parque Estatal Monte Tamalpais, que está al norte del Puente Golden Gate de San Francisco, se yergue majestuosamente desde el corazón del Condado de Marin. El Monte Tamalpais captura nuestra atención con sus amplias laderas con un manto de crestas cubiertas de chaparral, praderas y bosques de roble. Profundos cañones llenos de solemnes arboledas de secuoyas cruzan estas crestas y faldas para crear un ambiente diverso para una amplia variedad de especies de plantas y animales. El impresionante panorama desde el pico de 2,751 pies del Monte Tamalpais incluye los Farallones 25 millas mar adentro, las montañas del Condado de Marin, la Bahía de San Francisco, el Este de la Bahía y el Monte Diablo. Las temperaturas de primavera y verano son cálidas, con temperaturas medias máximas de 70 a 90 grados. El otoño e invierno pueden ser fríos, con temperaturas de 50 a 60 grados. La niebla es común. HISTORIA CULTURAL Pueblos Nativos Los Miwok de la costa vivían en o cerca del Monte Tamalpais, permaneciendo cerca de las fuentes de agua a lo largo y ancho del actual Condado de Marin. Estos habitantes nativos de California cazaban animales pequeños y ciervos, recolectaban bellotas, y recogían plantas y mariscos. Hacían cestas y collares de discos de concha, trocándolos por recursos no obtenibles localmente, tales como obsidiana de alta calidad de las tribus del Condado de Lake. Los Miwok de la costa tenían una cultura rica, y un lenguaje complejo y elaborado. Sin embargo, su estilo de vida cambió poco después de la llegada de los europeos. En 1770, dos exploradores, el capitán Pedro Fages y el padre Juan Crespí, le pusieron a la montaña el nombre de Sierra de Nuestro Padre de San Francisco. Esto se cambió después a la palabra Miwok “tamalpais,” cuya traducción aproximada significa “montaña de la bahía” o “montaña de la costa.” Tren Escénico del Monte Tamalpais Los residentes de San Francisco, cuya población explotó después del descubrimiento de oro en 1848, usaban el Monte Tamalpais para fines recreativos. Se desarrollaron senderos y en 1884 se construyó un camino de carretas hasta la cima de la montaña. El tren escénico del Monte Tamalpais, completado en 1896, transportaba visitantes hasta la cima de la montaña y Summit Tavern, un hotel y restaurante. La pendiente desde Mill Valley hasta la cima era tan pronunciada que el tren tenía que negociar 281 curvas, equivalentes a 42 círculos completos, anunciándose como el “ferrocarril más sinuoso del mundo.” En la sección conocida como “Double Bow Knot,” la vía se doblaba sobre sí misma cinco veces en 200 yardas. En 1907 se diseñó el “vagón de gravedad” para transportar a los visitantes desde la cima de la montaña hasta el cañón lleno de secuoyas de Muir Woods. Los vagones abiertos, que sólo requerían de la gravedad y un freno, transportaban a los pasajeros descendiendo por la montaña hasta Muir Woods a una emocionante velocidad de 12 millas por hora. El ferrocarril y los vagones de gravedad permitían que los turistas viajaran desde Mill Valley hasta la cima, descendieran hasta Muir Woods y volvieran a Mill Valley. Los famosos vagones de gravedad del tren escénico fueron populares hasta el advenimiento del automóvil y la construcción de Ridgecrest Boulevard en 1925. En el cobertizo de un vagón de gravedad en East Peak se exhibe una réplica de un vagón de gravedad. Esfuerzos de Conservación A lo largo de los años, millones de personas han acudido a la montaña, llamada TRAM Vagón de Gravedad del Tren Escénico del Monte Tam, alrededor de 1900 afectuosamente “Monte Tam,” para disfrutar de las espectaculares vistas y caminar por sus senderos. Generaciones de entu

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