Patrick's Point

State Park - California

Patrick's Point State Park is 25 miles (40 km) north of Eureka, California in the heart of California's coast redwood country. The State Park was named for Patrick Beegan, an Irish immigrant who originally called it Patrick's Ranch. The park is home to many tree species including coastal redwoods, spruce, hemlock, pine, fir and red alder and wildflower meadows with a shoreline that consists of sandy beaches and sheer cliffs against the Pacific Ocean. It is located in Humboldt County. Amenities include hiking trails, a recreated Yurok Village, a native plant garden, visitor center, three family campgrounds, two group camps, a camp for hikers and bicyclists, accessible beaches, lookout points, and three group picnic areas.

maps

Official visitor map of Redwood National and State Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Redwood - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Redwood National and State Parks (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Redwood National and State Parks (NP) in California with descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Redwood - Visitor Map with description

Official visitor map of Redwood National and State Parks (NP) in California with descriptions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=417 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick%27s_Point_State_Park Patrick's Point State Park is 25 miles (40 km) north of Eureka, California in the heart of California's coast redwood country. The State Park was named for Patrick Beegan, an Irish immigrant who originally called it Patrick's Ranch. The park is home to many tree species including coastal redwoods, spruce, hemlock, pine, fir and red alder and wildflower meadows with a shoreline that consists of sandy beaches and sheer cliffs against the Pacific Ocean. It is located in Humboldt County. Amenities include hiking trails, a recreated Yurok Village, a native plant garden, visitor center, three family campgrounds, two group camps, a camp for hikers and bicyclists, accessible beaches, lookout points, and three group picnic areas.
Our Mission Patrick’s Point State Park The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. In the springtime, herbs, grasses, and shrubs decorate the meadows, producing colorful wildflower displays and providing scenic views California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (707) 677-3570. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov SaveTheRedwoods.org/csp Patrick’s Point State Park 4150 Patrick’s Point Drive Trinidad, CA 95570 (707) 677-3570 www.parks.ca.gov /patrickspoint © 2007 California State Parks (Rev. 2016) of the shoreline and the rock outcrops. T hirty miles north of Eureka, a tree- and meadow-covered headland juts into the Pacific Ocean. This is Patrick’s Point State Park, with a shoreline that ranges from the broad sandy stretch of Agate Beach to sheer cliffs that rise high above the sea. A number of “sea stacks,” parts of the mainland that have been isolated by the pounding surf, stand offshore like fence pickets. Patrick’s Point is shrouded in fog much of the year. During the summer, sometimes fog does not burn off for days at a time. Crystal-clear days appear most frequently during spring and fall. Rainfall averages more than 60 inches a year  —  most of it falling between November and April. Temperatures are moderate much of the year, with only about a 10-degree difference in average temperatures between summer and winter. Summer highs average 62 degrees, with winter lows to 38 degrees. PARK HISTORY Native Americans Yurok people have lived in and around Patrick’s Point State Park for generations. The temperate climate and abundant wildlife of the North Coast promoted a culturally rich way of life that continues today. Yurok people built villages of redwood planks along the coast and major waterways. Traveling by dugout canoe, they fished for salmon. They also hunted elk, deer, and small game. Berries, roots, and many traditional plants are still harvested at Patrick’s Point; acorns are still gathered from the hillside areas east of the park. In 1850, when gold was found in the interior, the Yurok people were overwhelmed by an influx of settlers. Conflict over the land took many forms. The native people were hunted down; any who survived the attacks were forced onto reservations. Newly introduced diseases further decimated their numbers. Today, the Yurok have made a remarkable recovery. As the most populous tribe in California, nearly 5,500 Yurok live in Humboldt and Del Norte Counties. Tribal members are building a future by revitalizing their ancestral language and traditions based on the customs of the past. Europeans and Americans Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo and Sir Francis Drake sailed along the coast of what is now Humboldt County as early as the 16th century, but it was a Spanish vessel captained by Bruno de Hezeta that braved the unpredictable winds and rocky shoreline to land in Trinidad Bay in 1775. The fur trade had come to the Trinidad Bay region by June of 1801. Captain Jonathan Winship arranged with Governor Alexandr Baranov of Sitka, Alaska, to take 100 native people from the Aleutian Islands to California on a successful sea-otter hunting expedition. With the discovery of gold in northern California’s Trinity River in the mid1800s, the local territory experienced a rush of miners, packers, and would-be entrepreneurs. Those who had come seeking adventure and wealth through trading and trapping gave way to gold miners and settlers. THE PARK The California State Park Commission purchased Patrick’s Point in 1929 after approval of the 1928 Park Bond. Additional land was acquired over several years, bringing the park’s total to 640 acres. From the beginning, the park was identified as a potential site for a traditional Indian village that would portray the rich culture of the northwest coast. and pine. Spring and summer wildflowers Sumêg Village include Douglas iris, fairy bells, trillium, In the 1800s, the Yurok world extended skunk cabbage, azalea, and rhododendron. from the mouth of the Klamath River Thimbleberries, salmonberries, and north to Wilson Creek, near Crescent huckleberries are found along meadow City, and south to Little River, near edges. Fall and early winter bring out a McKinleyville. The Yurok people lived wide variety of mushrooms, which may be in more than 50 villages, from the north viewed but may not be picked. at Big Lagoon to the south at Trinidad. Village sizes varied from two to two dozen ho
Patrick’s Point State Park 4150 Patrick’s Point Dr. • Trinidad, CA 95570 • (707) 677-3570 Located 25 miles north of Eureka, Patrick’s Point sits in the heart of California’s coast redwood country. The park’s dense forests stretch over an ocean headland. A dramatic shoreline offers great opportunities to explore tide pools or watch whales, sea lions and brilliant sunsets. The park has several miles of hiking trails, a recreated Yurok Village, a n­ative plant garden, a visitor center, three family campgrounds, and two group camps. THE VISITOR CENTER has displays, brochures, and sales items available. Brochures and hiking maps are also available at the entrance station. PARK FEES are due and payable upon entry. The campsite fee covers one vehicle. Additional fees apply for extra vehicles (limit of two vehicles per campsite). CAMPING RESERVATIONS may be made up to seven months in advance by calling 1-800-444-7275 (TTY 1-800-274-7275). Campsites are reserved firstcome, first-served and are site-specific. To make online reservations, visit our web site at www.parks.ca.gov. SPEED LIMIT: The maximum speed limit is 15 mph. When pedestrians, bicyclists and children are present, even 15 mph might be too fast. Use good judgment. FIREWOOD is available for purchase, or you may bring your own. Please do not collect dead wood, as it is an essential part of the park’s natural recycling systems. Ground fires are not allowed. GAMES that are disruptive to the other campers or to the environment are strictly prohibited. WILD ANIMALS: To ensure that you will not have a negative encounter with wildlife, please pack out all garbage and dispose of it properly. Bear-resistant metal lockers are provided only at the Agate campground. All food, beverages, and toiletries are required by law to be stored in the provided food lockers, unless being consumed or being prepared for consumption. CHECK-OUT TIME is noon. Please vacate your site by that time. Check-in time is 2 p.m. OCCUPANCY: Each campsite may have up to eight persons (including children). n mo er Sal Riv e Riv r QUIET HOURS are from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. Ensure an enjoyable experience for everyone; please do not disturb other campers, regardless of the time of day or night. Del Norte Coast Redwoods SP a th K l am VEHICLE PARKING: Park only in your assigned campsite. Vehicles must remain on the pavement and must not extend into the roadway beyond the campsite number or limit line. Jedediah Smith Redwoods SP Patrick’s Point SP NOISE: Radios and other sound-producing devices must not be audible beyond your immediate campsite, regardless of the time of day or night. GENERATORS may be operated only between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. BICYCLES are allowed only on paved roadways (not on trails). DOGS are restricted to the camp and picnic areas and must be kept on a leash no longer than six feet and under your supervision at all times. Dogs are not permitted on the trails or beaches, and they must be confined in a vehicle or tent at night. Richardson Grove SP Discover the many states of California.TM CAMPING RESERVATIONS: You may make camping reservations by calling (800) 444-7275 (TTY 800-274-7275). To make online reservations, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov. ALTERNATE FORMAT: This publication is available in alternate formats by contacting California State Parks at (800) 777-0369, or 711, TTY relay service. 99 86 87 89 88 Patrick’s Point State Park 90 96 92 94 91 97 95 93 For Emergencies Dial 98 To Beach 100 101 117 116 115 118 113 120 9-1-1. 121 124 123 © 2009 California State Parks 103 111 109 104 105 107 106 108 110 112 119 122 102 AGATE CAMPGROUND Mussel Rock Wedding Rock Patrick’s Point Bishop Pine Group Picnic Area Rocky Point LEGEND Agate Campground Accessible Ceremonial Rock Red Alder Group Campground Visitor’s Center Abablone Point Sumêg Village Group Campground Native Plant Garden Abalone Campground CH Camp Host Campfire Center Campground Ranger Office To ick Group Picnic Or Hike/Bike Campgrnd Parking 101 Pay Phone Palmer’s Point To T rin idad Penn Campground Beach Creek Group Camp Pay Showers Restrooms 47 45 44 43 40 View Point 39 37 46 42 41 48 38 49 35 36 50 51 34 32 33 52 54 30 31 53 55 56 Dump Station Visitor Center 29 CH 58 57 59 85 60 61 62 ABALONE CAMPGROUND 80 79 77 64 65 68 69 67 25 23 24 22 82 81 63 66 26 84 83 Entrance Station 28 27 12 14 11 15 13 21 19 18 78 16 17 76 75 73 74 72 70 71 1 20 2 3 4 5 6 7 10 9 8 PENN CAMPGROUND

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