Refugio

State Beach - California

Refugio State Beach (Chumash: Qasil, "Beautiful") is a protected state beach park located 20 miles (32 km) west of Santa Barbara, California. It is 2.5 miles (4.0 km) west of El Capitán State Beach. During the summer months, the Junior Life Guard program resides at the beach during the day. The Refugio oil spill occurred just north of park in 2015 when a pipeline ruptured. The spill went into a culvert that ran under the U.S. 101, and into the ocean. The spill spread over 7-mile of coastline (11 km) including this park and El Capitán State Beach.

maps

Recreation Map of San Rafael Wilderness and Santa Ynez Mountains in Los Padres National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).Los Padres - San Rafael Wilderness and Santa Ynez Mountains

Recreation Map of San Rafael Wilderness and Santa Ynez Mountains in Los Padres National Forest (NF) in California. Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS).

Official visitor map of Channel Islands National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Channel Islands - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Channel Islands National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=603 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Refugio_State_Beach Refugio State Beach (Chumash: Qasil, "Beautiful") is a protected state beach park located 20 miles (32 km) west of Santa Barbara, California. It is 2.5 miles (4.0 km) west of El Capitán State Beach. During the summer months, the Junior Life Guard program resides at the beach during the day. The Refugio oil spill occurred just north of park in 2015 when a pipeline ruptured. The spill went into a culvert that ran under the U.S. 101, and into the ocean. The spill spread over 7-mile of coastline (11 km) including this park and El Capitán State Beach.
Our Mission Refugio State Beach The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. On clear days, visitors to Refugio State Beach enjoy matchless views of four offshore islands — San Miguel, Santa Rosa, Santa Cruz, and California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (805) 968-1033. If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369. (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ Refugio State Beach 10 Refugio Beach Road Goleta, CA 93117 (805) 968-1033 © 2015 California State Parks Anacapa —  as they stroll the beach’s craggy coastal bluffs. A t Refugio State Beach, 22 miles west of Santa Barbara, fan and date palms decorate a crescent-shaped curve of sand. This is a quiet place to build sand castles, surf, dive, stroll the trails, watch wildlife, pitch a tent, and cast a fishing pole. From the hills above the beach, Refugio Creek makes its way to the ocean. The Santa Ynez Mountains, part of Los Padres National Forest, dominate the scenery. PARK HISTORY The Native People The native Chumash people originally lived in this area. The Chumash territory generally extended from today’s San Luis Obispo south to Malibu. Three villages, likely occupied at different times, surrounded Refugio Bay. The most recent of these, according to mission records, was named Kasil, translated as “pretty place.” Refugio Bay was a port of trade between Chumash people on Santa Cruz Island and the inland village of Soxtonokmu in the Santa Ynez Valley. The lagoon would have provided a wealth of resources from the sea, obtained via the tomol (redwood plank canoe). The surrounding marshes provided willows and tules for construction of the traditional Chumash house or ap. Despite the widespread decimation of the native population from disease, violence, and starvation after Spanish arrival, many Chumash people have maintained important cultural traditions for current and future generations. Kayakers’ paradise of Rancho Nuestra Señora del Refugio to non-family members between 1858 and 1889. The remaining grassy portion was used mostly for cattle ranching. Scottish émigrés Nelson and J. Monroe Rutherford bought 500 beachside acres in the early 20th century, opening a private resort called Refugio Cove and Beach. Their beach resort had rental cabins, campsites, an arbor, a children’s pool, and a small camp store. The State of California bought Refugio from Rutherford descendants in 1950. In 1963, it was classified a state beach. Spanish Explorers and French Pirates In the 1790s, José Francisco Ortega was awarded the first land grant on the Santa Barbara coast, the 26,529-acre Nuestra GEOLOGY Señora del Refugio. He raised cattle there. Four geologic types make up the land at The Spanish monarchy that governed Alta Refugio State Beach: Rincon formation California at that time forbade any trade with (brown-gray clay marine shale); Monterey non-Spanish ships or countries, considering formation (an oil‑producing this smuggling. When Ortega’s son, José formation of shales María, inherited the rancho, he began and limestone); trading cowhides, leather, and tallow with terrace deposits foreign ships rather than waiting months for (often containing Spanish goods that did not always arrive. fossil material, In 1818, notorious French pirate Hippolyte though none Bouchard learned of Ortega’s wealth and has been found set out to raid Refugio. However, the here); and residents —warned about Bouchard’s alluvium (soils intentions —fled inland to hide their and rock—  the valuables. In the end, Bouchard burned youngest deposit Ortega’s adobe home and cattle station and of the four types). destroyed his livestock, but he left Refugio empty-handed. A neat row of non-native Rancho Nuestra Señora del Refugio palms lines the shore. Like many large Alta California land grantees, the Ortegas sold off pieces Photo courtesy of Jean Bjerke Long-billed curlews Situated between the south branch of the Santa Ynez and the Arroyo Parida ground faults, Refugio is also affected by several offshore geologic faults. NATURAL HISTORY The mostly landscaped park had little native vegetation after Ortega’s cattle grazed here. Between the late 1920s and 1950, thenowners the Rutherford brothers planted the neat row of stately palm trees along the shore. Now part of the park’s historical landscaping, the palms were intended to attract tourists to what the Rutherfords called their “tropical paradise.” Bird species found in th
Refugio State Beach 10 Refugio Beach Road • Goleta, CA 93117 (805) 968-1033 Refugio State Beach offers excellent coastal fishing as well as trails and picnic sites. Palm trees planted near Refugio Creek give a distinctive look to the beach and camping area. PARK FEES are due and payable upon entry into the park. Use the self-registration system if the entrance station is closed. The campsite fee covers one vehicle. There are additional fees for extra vehicles. OCCUPANCY: Eight people maximum are allowed per campsite (including children). VEHICLE PARKING: Vehicles may only be parked in your assigned campsite. They must remain on the pavement and must not extend into the roadway beyond the campsite number or limit line. Three vehicles maximum are allowed per campsite. Trailers must be backed into the campsite parking space. Motor homes may be pulled forward or backed in. CHECK-OUT TIME is noon. Please vacate your site by that time. Check-in time is 2 p.m. RE-REGISTRATION: Campers without reservations who wish to re-register for another night must contact the entrance station before 9 a.m. on the morning they are due out. Site availability is not assured. QUIET HOURS are from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. To ensure an enjoyable experience for everyone, please do not disturb other campers, regardless of the time of day or night. DOGS must be kept on a leash no longer than six feet and under control at all times. They are not permitted in buildings or on the beach (except for service dogs). Dogs must be confined to a vehicle or tent at night. Please clean up after your pet. FIRES AND FIREWOOD: Please be cautious when building fires. Fires are allowed only in established fire rings or camp stoves, and they are not permitted on the beach. Do not build ground fires outside the fire rings or leave campfires unattended. Do not gather firewood in the park––the nutrients must be allowed to recycle back into the ecosystem. You may purchase firewood from the camp hosts. SPEED LIMIT: The maximum speed limit is 15 mph. When pedestrians, bicyclists, and children are present, even 15 mph might be too fast. Use good judgment. BICYCLES are allowed on roadways only. Visitors under 18 must wear a safety helmet for bicycling, skateboarding, and scooter riding. GENERATORS may only be operated between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. CAMPING RESERVATIONS: You may make camping reservations by calling (800) 444-7275 (TTY 800-274-7275). To make online reservations, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov. ALTERNATE FORMAT: If you need this publication in an alternate format, contact interp@parks.ca.gov. Refugio State Beach ENTRANCE PARK SECTOR OFF ICE California Coastal (Aniso) Trail 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 8 22 21 9 10 (A, B, C, I, J) 11 12 13 49 29 47 30 45 Creek EXTRA VEHICLE LOT o Refugi (D, E, F, G, H) 28 31 41 32 39 33 37 34* 35* DAY USE 50 44 51 43 53 67 66 55 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 23* 24* 25* 26* 27* 46 BEACH 42 57 40 58 38 59 LEGEND # Accessible Campsite Accessible Feature Camp Host Site Campfire Center Campsite: Hike & Bike Entrance Station Group Campground (A - J) Parking Premium Campsite Restrooms Store 65 54 64 56 63 Bouchard 62 61 36* 60* DAY USE BEACH Pacific Ocean Your Site # _________ 52 Map not to scale NOISE: Voices, radios, and other sound-producing devices must not be audible beyond your immediate campsite, regardless of the time of day or night. ACTIVITIES that are disruptive to the other campers or the environment are strictly prohibited. THEFT WARNING: Keep your vehicles locked and your valuables out of sight. Do not leave property out at night. Report suspicious activity to a ranger or camp host. For Emergencies, Dial 911. Jellyfish © 2007 California State Parks (Rev. 2016)

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