Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch

County Park - California

Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park is nestled in the hills east of Gilroy, California, features a 449 acre lake for fishing and boating. Coyote Lake has a “world-class” population of black bass, as well as bluegill, black crappie, and Eurasian carp. Coyote Bear provides habitats for many species of birds, reptiles, amphibians, insects and mammals. The park is home to rare western pond turtle, California tiger salamander and Bay checkerspot butterfly. Two-Hundred-Nineteen species of birds have been seen, including our “National Bird” the bald eagle. During your visit you can also be sure to see black-tailed deer, and turkeys. Even mountain lions have been seen by visitors in the park’s hinterlands.

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Map of Coyote Lake - Harvey Bear Ranch County Park (CP) in Santa Clara County, California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.Santa Clara - Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch

Map of Coyote Lake - Harvey Bear Ranch County Park (CP) in Santa Clara County, California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.

brochures

Map of Lakeview Campground at Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch - Lakeview Campground

Map of Lakeview Campground at Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.

Hiking at Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch - Hiking

Hiking at Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.

Mammals of Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch - Mammals

Mammals of Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.

Feral Pigs at Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch - Feral Pigs

Feral Pigs at Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.

Mountain Lions at Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch - Mountain Lions

Mountain Lions at Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.

Wildflowers of Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch - Wildflowers

Wildflowers of Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.

Brochure of Santa Clara County Parks in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.Santa Clara County Parks - Brochure

Brochure of Santa Clara County Parks in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.

Brochure of Santa Clara County Parks in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.Santa Clara County Parks - Brochure (spanish)

Brochure of Santa Clara County Parks in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.

Brochure of Santa Clara County Parks in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.Santa Clara County Parks - Brochure (vietnamese)

Brochure of Santa Clara County Parks in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.

Map of Santa Clara County Parks in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.Santa Clara County Parks - Map

Map of Santa Clara County Parks in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.

Wildflowers at Santa Clara County Parks in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.Santa Clara County Parks - Wildflowers

Wildflowers at Santa Clara County Parks in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.

Camping at Santa Clara County Parks in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.Santa Clara County Parks - Camping

Camping at Santa Clara County Parks in California. Published by Santa Clara County Parks.

Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch CP https://www.sccgov.org/sites/parks/parkfinder/Pages/CoyoteLake.aspx Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch County Park is nestled in the hills east of Gilroy, California, features a 449 acre lake for fishing and boating. Coyote Lake has a “world-class” population of black bass, as well as bluegill, black crappie, and Eurasian carp. Coyote Bear provides habitats for many species of birds, reptiles, amphibians, insects and mammals. The park is home to rare western pond turtle, California tiger salamander and Bay checkerspot butterfly. Two-Hundred-Nineteen species of birds have been seen, including our “National Bird” the bald eagle. During your visit you can also be sure to see black-tailed deer, and turkeys. Even mountain lions have been seen by visitors in the park’s hinterlands.
LAKE VIE W C AMPGR OUND 45 To Day Use and Launch Ramp (1.0 mile) 46 44 TRAILS LEGEND C O Y O T E L A K E 43 47 FA C I L I T Y L E G E N D Hiking / Equestrian / Bicycling Ranger Station/Visitor Center Phone: (408) 842-7800 Hiking / Bicycling 48 Coyote Res e r voir Road 41 40 38 56 58 65 54 59 68 60 70 29 28 62 72 27 Elevation Contour (feet) Trail Distance (miles) Scenic Vista 25 26 71 1400 1.1 73 69 20 Service Road (No Public Access) 30 61 63 CH Two Lane Park Road 32 31 64 P Two Lane Paved Road 33 57 55 66 67 34 36 37 Creek 21 24 19 Areas Currently Closed to the Public 9 P 11 To Park Office TRAIL CAMPGROUND Private Property 8 10 P 15 13 P Other Public Property 23 22 12 Gate 17 Public Telephone P Parking Handicap Accessible Showers (Campground Only) Boat Launch Ramp Environmental Area 5 MPH Boating Zone Boat Traffic Pattern Fishing Picnic Area Campground Amphitheater Wetland (Not accessible) Overflow 14 18 16 7 6 (0.7 mile) P 5 3 Group Site w/10 Parking Spaces P 1 Restrooms Bay Area Ridge Trail 35 39 53 Pay Station Paved Hiking/Bicycling 51 52 Information + Pay Machine Paved Hiking/Equestrian/Bicycling 42 50 P Entrance Kiosk/ Hiking 49 2 4 Sites 1-18 have Water & Electrical Hook-ups P Disabled Parking 69 Disabled Campsite CH Camp Host
Coyote Lake – Harvey Bear Ranch Hiking “The Coyote-Bear!” Several trails at the Coyote-Bear, provide visitors with spectacular hiking opportunities. These trails range from the wide, maintained and relatively easy Coyote Ridge, to the narrower and steeper trails on both side of the ridge. It is the responsibility of hikers to plan their trip for their comfort and safety. Toward that end hikers should follow the rules listed in the Coyote Lake- Harvey Bear Ranch County Park General Brochure, and those guidelines listed below: • Stay on designated trails when hiking- avoid animal paths which are narrow and potentially dangerous. • Overlooks and trail edges with steep drop-offs should be avoided. Children should be supervised by an adult at all times. • Do not hike alone. Use a “buddy system which allows someone to seek help if necessary. • Carry and drink plenty of water. You should carry a minimum of one quart for every hour you hike. If the weather is hot, carry more! • Beware of poison oak, rattlesnakes and ticks. Poison oak can be identified by its cluster of three shiny leaflets. Rattlesnakes warm themselves on sunny portions of trails. Ticks ‘lie in wait’ on grasses and plant stalks, hitchhiking on to both wildlife and humans. • Don’t start a wildfire! Please do not smoke on park trails. • No hiking is allowed off-trail. The park is surrounded by both private property, and public property that is currently off-limits to the public. • Later in the day, check the day’s sunset time before you start. Park gates close at sunset. HIKE DISTANCE DIFFICULTY DESCRIPTION & HIGHLIGHTS (miles, roundround-trip) From Bear Ranch: 1 Martin Murphy Loop 2.0 (paved) Easy This mostly level paved paved path is popular with joggers in the morning and evening. The trail provides great views of the Santa Cruz Range Range and the Diablo foothills. Hikers will notice huge Valley Oaks in in the field and can spot ground squirrels, American Kestrel and maybe even a golden eagle overhead. As you head up the Willow Springs Canyon notice the huge landslide landslide to your right. This hike takes you through hills and dales that have been intensively used by cattle. You will pass through the Front Front Creek drainage numerous times. Great views of Coyote Ridge can be seen on this trail. Up Willow Spring Canyon this hike passes through a beautiful small small glen after crossing Coffin Creek. The return on Harvey Bear Trail Trail provides great views of the southern Santa Clara Valley 2 Willow Springs/ Rancho San Ysidro/ Ysidro/ Savannah 5.3 Moderate 3 Willow Springs/ Town Springs Harvey Bear 4.4 Moderate 4. Harvey Bear/ Coyote Ridge/ Willow Springs 6.0 Strenuous This hike makes a grand loop of the park’ park’s north end. Climbing to the top of Coyote Ridge, the trail turns north providing great views views of the valley, and of Coyote Lake. Once it reach Harvey Bear the the trail gives you an “edge of the world” world” feeling as you drop back into the valley where you started Climbing from the campground through a forest of coast live oak, this hike turns north onto the Valley Oak Trail where you enter a rare blue oak woodland with beautiful views of Coyote Lake. After a short jaunt on the Calaveras you turn south onto Coyote Ridge where you are afforded great views of the Santa Clara Valley. At Campground Trail you go downhill back to you car, tent or trailer, This hike explores the southern end of the park. Going south on Coyote Ridge Trail, you are right on the Calaveras Fault trace. Along the way you’ you’ll see linear valleys and small sag ponds. Turn west onto the Mendoza Trail hiking to the “Ankle of Mummy Mtn.” Mtn.”, a pass where you turn north onto the Mummy Mtn Trail. Here you’ you’ll climb to the mountaintop passing interesting rock formations and catching glimpses of the Coyote Creek Canyon to the east. Enjoy the view on top of Mummy Mtn. before you climb down, returning to the campground. From Campground Trailhead: 5 Campground./Valley Oak/ Coyote Ridge 3.0 Moderate 6 Campground/Coyote Ridge/ Mummy Mountain/Mendoza 4.3 Strenuous From Mendoza Ranch: 7 Coyote Ridge/ Mummy Mtn./ Mendoza South 3.6 Moderate 8 Coyote Ridge/Mendoza 3.0 Moderate Follow this trail along the main trace of the Calaveras Fault, hiking hiking in a beautiful oakoak-studded valley. At the fence separating the Mendoza and Bear Ranches, take a right onto the Mummy Mtn. Trail for spectacular spectacular views of the south Santa Clara Valley and Coyote Lake. Coming down down off the mountain, take Mendoza and Coyote Ridge Trails back to the trailhead trailhead Taking Coyote Ridge Tr. from the trailhead, take the Mendoza Trail. Trail. The trail winds along the west slope of Coyote Ridge providing great views of the valley. Watch for deer, coyotes and turkey vultures soaring above the ridge. Mendoza intersects Coyote Ridge Trail. Turn south and return return to the trailhead. From Launch Area/Ohlone Trailhead: 9
Coyote LakeHarvey Bear Ranch Santa Clara County Parks & Recreation Department County of Santa Clara- Environmental Resources Agency Coyote Lake-Harvey Bear Ranch County Park Gilroy, California Can’t-Miss Mammals! A large variety of mammals inhabit the woodlands and grasslands this 4,598-acre park east of the cities of Gilroy and Morgan Hill in southern Santa Clara Valley. They range in size from tiny shrews to the massive wild pigs, which can reach 500 pounds in weight. Mammals are different from other animals in that they have hair or fur on their bodies, they produce milk for their young, and they are warm-blooded. Some mammals in the park can be seen during the day, but many don’t come out until the cool of the night using the cover of darkness to hunt or graze. Early morning and dusk are they best time to see many mammals in the park. Do not approach, harass, or feed mammals at Coyote LakeHarvey Bear Ranch; or any other park or protected area you visit. Many visitors in the U.S. are injured or killed each year by the same “Can’t-Miss Mammals” that can be found in this park. Appreciate mammals, and all wildlife, from a safe distance. Coyote Wild (Feral) Pig This is the largest commonly seen mammal in the park. Wild pigs are omnivoreseating just about anything!. These mammals were introduced by man into this area from Russia at the turn of the century. Wild pigs can be quite dangerous if harassed. They have a combination of poor eyesight, a bad temper, and males have long-sharp tusks. But, they have a great sense of smell, and they have lots of cute babies. Therefore, visitors should keep all food, including “alcoholic beverages,” secured in car trunks or park-provided “pig-proof” storage cabinets. Black-tailed Deer This is largest native mammal in the park. Males (bucks) can weigh up to 250 pounds and sport large racks of antlers. Deer are herbivores, feeding on grasses, shrubs, seeds and trees. In autumn, one of their favorite foods are oak tree acorns. Deer can be commonly seen at dawn and dusk near the Ranger Station, and in the campgrounds grazing grasses and shrubs wet with morning dew. October throughDecember, bucks can be seen fighting for a harem of females (does’). In May and June, does’ give birth to tiny whitespotted fawns. Their spots provide camouflage against predators. California Ground Squirrels Most of the burrows seen along park trails; and in picnic areas and campgrounds have been dug and inhabited by these fast-eating and fastbreeding native rodents. Rodents are mammals that have constantlygrowing teeth that must be kept-worn down through constant eating and gnawing of plant material. Ground squirrels are also notorious for spreading “weed seeds” along park trails. Because there are fewer predators like coyotes and bobcats, they also make tons-o-babies each year leading to too many burrows. Though park staff tries to fill these in, they can still be “ankle-breakers” to inattentive visitors- “So Watch Here Your Step!” Striped Skunk Hard to find by day, the striped skunk can’t be missed (or smelled) by night. Night time is work time for skunks, and that means looking for food. Being omnivores, skunks can be found munching everything from berries and seeds to bugs and lizards. Just don’t get caught behind them while their tail and back legs are up in the air. That means you’ve scared them, and are about to get “SKUNKED…& STUNKED!” Western Gray Squirrel Tree Squirrels (Western Gray-Eastern Gray- Fox) Seeds and nuts are the favorite food of these chipper little rodents. Of the three kinds found in the park, only one (the western gray squirrel) is native to this area. The eastern gray and fox squirrels have been transplanted from the eastern United States of America by people in the last century. In fact, the transplants are more commonly seen now than the native squirrel species. Eastern gray and fox squirrels are larger and more aggressive than western grays, out-competing them for habitat and food. So, if you see a tree squirrel with brown or red in their fur it’s a transplant. But, if you’re lucky you might catch a glimpse of the native western gray squirrel! Fox Squirrel Eastern Gray Squirrel Coyote This, the only native wild dog found in the park, is one-half the namesake of Coyote Lake-Harvey Bear Ranch County Park. In fact, many place names in Santa Clara County have “coyote” in them. Why? Explorers and pioneers in the 1700’s and 1800”s found so many of them in some areas, they couldn’t help themselves. The famous Spanish explorer Juan Bautista De Anza in 1776, named the stream that now feeds Coyote Lake“arroyo de los coyotes” -because of the abundance of coyotes found in this area. Though primarily carnivores, coyotes will eat a berry or an acorn in a pinch. I guess that might make them “carbivores!” Hit-Or-Miss Mammals For The Lucky Visitor To Discover! Opossum Bobcat (not common) Gray Fox (not common) Tule Elk (rare) Pronghorn (rare) Mountain Lion Trowbridge Shrew
RESOURCES: Department of Fish and Game (707) 944-5531 For hunting, trapping and general advice contact: www.dfg.ca.gov FERAL PIGS County of Santa Clara (408) 355-2200 For county property damage and maintenance contact: www.sccgov.org/portal/site/parks/ City of San Jose –Parks Dept. (408) 535-3570 For city property damage and maintenance contact: wwww.sjparks.org/ City of San Jose – Animal Care & Services (408) 578-7297 For injured or sick animals contact: www.sanjoseanimals.com Little Blue Society (650) 365-8623 For human-animal conflict resolution contact: mary@littlebluesociety.org Order Artiodactyla : Family Suidae : Sus scrofa Linnaeus Animal Care & Services 2750 Monterey Road San Jose, CA 95111 www.sanjoseanimals.com 408/ 578-PAWS (7297) Description: Feral pigs in California are descended from introductions of European wild hogs for sporting purposes, and from escaped domestic swine that have established feral populations. They are brown to blackish brown color, with grizzled guard hairs, a mane of hair (8-16 cm long) running along the back from the neck to the rump, a straight heavily tufted tail, and ears covered with hair. Characteristics of feral hogs are varied, depending upon the breed of the ancestral stock. Habitat and food: Wooded areas close to water, and diverse forests with some openings, hills and mountainsides. The presence of a good litter layer to support soil invertebrates and/or the presence of ground vegetation affording green forage, roots, and tubers is desirable. Hogs are also fond of marsh. Feral pigs eat a variety of items, including fruits, roots, acorns, mushrooms, and invertebrates, depending on the season. Feral pigs can have detectable influences on wildlife and plant communities as well as domestic crops and livestock. Extensive disturbance of vegetation and soil occurs as a result of their rooting habits. Foraging occurs both during the day and night, but is most intense at night, especially during the summer. The tusks which may be used as dangerous weapons, function primarily in finding and harvesting food. Feral pigs generally breed year round; litters range from one to seven. Their sense of sight is rather poor but their senses of hearing and smell are extremely acute. Wild hogs are typically not aggressive and will retreat if approached. However, when cornered, wounded, or defending young, they may charge and are capable of inflicting serious wounds with their razor sharp tusks. Predators: Young pigs are taken by a number of different predators, including, hawks, owls, eagles, foxes, coyote and bobcats. Adults are rarely taken because of their large size, but mountain lions occasionally kill and consume wild hogs. Why should I be concerned? Property that is near open space, foothills, or water is particularly vulnerable to pig damage. Primarily, pig damage consists of the destruction of grass lawns. Because of their size and strength, pigs can also cause damage to fencing and irrigation systems. What can I do? The one certain method that will protect your lawn is low, sturdy fencing. If this is not a practical or preferred solution, you may want to try the following: • • • • Why can’t we just get rid of them? Many thousands of pigs live in the foothills to the south and east of San Jose. It is difficult and costly to have a lasting impact on the pig populations in this area through trapping or hunting. It is illegal to relocate pigs to another area. It is dangerous to the community to hunt pigs that are in or near city areas. It would cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to fence all of the areas exposed to the pig habitat (it would not be very attractive either). • Use a biological or chemical application on your lawn that will reduce the number of invertebrates (snails, grubs, larvae) living under your grass. ~ The pigs aren’t interested in your grass they are interested in what is under your grass. Consider a landscape that contains little or no grass. Water your lawn less, particularly during the summer and fall. This makes your lawn less attractive to the invertebrates, which makes your lawn less attractive to the pigs. Drought tolerant grasses are recommended. Use motion sensitive devises that will detect the pig’s movement. These devices can be used to produce bright light, or even a water stream that will frighten the pigs. Hire a trapper. The Department of Fish and Game can advise you who the licensed pig trappers are in the area. DO NOT EVER PHYSICALLY CONFRONT A FERAL PIG
Many times people confuse mountain lions with bobcats. Besides being much smaller (about 1/3 the size), bobcats have spots in adulthood, they have a fluffy beard around their face, and they have a short, bobbed tail. Mountain Lions are just one of many mammals that call the park home. Remember, a “mammal” is different from other animals, as it has hair or fur on its body, females produce milk for its young, and it is warm-blooded. LONG-TAIL... NO SPOTS! To learn more about mountain lions and other mammals that live in the park, see a park ranger and pick-up a copy of Can’t Miss Mammals” at the visitor center. Mountain lions are beautiful and fascinating creatures. They keep the deer population from exploding, and are a iconic symbol of parks and wilderness. Enjoy your stay at Coyote Lake – Harvey Bear Ranch County Park. But, remember… “ Take Only Pictures (and Memories)Leave Only Footprints” GO OUTSIDE & PLAY! Mountain Lions Of The Coyote-Bear Mountain lions are BIG! After the Jaguar, they are the largest wild cat in the Western Hemisphere. From the tip of their nose to the end of their long, fat tail an adult male can reach 9 feet in length! Babies (cubs) are born with spots, which make them very cute. But don’t get too close, because mom’s usually around! Mountain lions can be found throughout parts of North & South America. In other areas, they can be named- cougar, catamount, puma, or panther. But they’re all the same animal. Mountain lions’ primary prey are deer. They hunt mostly at dusk. So if your out on the trails early, bring a partner and watchout! Chance are, though, that you’ll be fine. In California only three people have been killed by a mountain lion in the last 100-years. If you are approached by a mountain lion, yell or scream loudly; and make yourself look big and scary by waving your arms above your head. That should make him “scram!” But, whatever you do, don’t try to run away. These cats are instinctively wired to chase fleeing prey, which could be you if you run! So when hiking, be aware of your surroundings, including looking up every now and then.
Serpentine Wildflowers Sanicle Tidy Tips California Poppy Muilla Checkerbloom Suncup Spring Gold Goldfields California Plantain Owl’ Owl’s Clover Hooker’ Hooker’s Onion Creamcups Popcorn Flower Miniature Lupine Creamcups 150,000,000-65,000,000 years ago the plate (crust) under the Pacific Ocean was being forced (subducted) under the North American Plate. As the plate, made up of a lava rock called basalt, was forced under it began to melt. At the same time boiling water seeped into the “trench” and turned to salty steam. This transformed (metamorphosed) the basalt into a green and black, waxy-looking rock that looked like snake skin. It is called “serpentine.” Over millions of years this rock decomposed in to soil rich in magnesium and iron, but poor in calcium sodium and potassium. The uniquely adapted plants seen in this booklet thrive in this rare soil-type. Serpentine in one of the rarest habitats in California. Enjoy the beauty of these flowers each Spring. Serpentine GO OUTSIDE & PLAY! WILDFLOWERS OF THE SERPENTINE REALM
Ed R. Levin Calaveras Reservoir d Ca l av eras R Penitencia it Creek Joseph D. Grant cia iten Penreek Rd C Ave 1O1 M yR R d Sa nF eli Rd 82 87 d Qu i m b pe wy yH re te on ll Tu • y Alu Mt. Hamilton elev. 4213 130 xpy ol E pit Ca ock mR Hellyer Almaden Expy Martial Cottle M etc rn al New Almaden ile Anderson Lake Coyote Creek t d. net eR Bur ve ran A ch o C s Rd as Rd Calero kG le n Av M San Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ave Rd artin Uvas Reservoir ood Redw t Rd Retrea Mt. Madonna elev. 1896 ChitactacAdams le ves Lea Gilroy 152 Mt Madonna Pacheco Reservoir y Rd 152 nta Te r e sa Blv d 1 Gilroy Hot Springs Rd 1O1 Sa Po le L ine • Ave New Wa t s o nv i l l e d e R s Rd oy U va Cr wy yH ere nt Mo Oa Chesbro Reservoir Uvas Canyon ve ne A Dun Morgan Hill Llag Almaden Reservoir Ba Rd d op nR U va Almaden maden Quicksilver ksil Kea Field Sports ve yA Ro Mc Motorcycle Be Santa Teresa n Ave alf Rd Rd Santa Teresa Blvd San Francisco Bay Ed R. Levin 237 R y nF m Martial Cottle Santa Teresa Camden Ave ks Rd Mc d New Almaden ile Anderson Lake Coyote Creek Calero t d. net eR Bur ve ran A ch o C kG le n Av M San artin Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ave Rd R Uvas Reservoir ood Redw t Rd Retrea Mt. Madonna elev. 1896 ChitactacAdams le ves Lea Gilroy 152 Mt Madonna Te r e Blv d Monterey Bay Pacheco Reservoir y Rd 152 nta sa 1 Gilroy Hot Springs Rd 1O1 Sa Po le L ine • Ave New Wa t s o nv i l l e d e oy s Rd Cr U va Uvas Canyon wy yH ere nt Oa Chesbro Reservoir • Mo Loma Prieta elev. 3791 ve ne A Dun Morgan Hill Llag Almaden Reservoir Ba s Rd Mt. Umunhum elev. 3486 nR Field Sports ve yA Rd Almaden Quicksilver Kea alf Rd Motorcycle U va • M etc Santa Teresa Blvd as Rd Hic Rd Hellyer Guadalupe Reservoir 17 eli Rd Sa Sa rn al ra to g Bascom Ave San Tomas Expy i l l B l vd oth Fo rn Lexington Reservoir d Be Saratoga-Sunnyvale Rd Page M Sa Black Rd le Co d an d Qu i m b Rd vd Sanborn Sanb non R 85 Almaden Expy ne Bl Los Gatos yR • pe yli a illsd han ll Tu 82 87 ve le A Mt. Hamilton elev. 4213 130 y Hw 17 Campbell Los Gatos H eek Villa Creek Vasona Montalvo Lake S 9 o 1O1 y re te on Cupertino Saratoga nb Santa Cruz County San Jose Stevens Creek 9 San Mateo County Alu Santa Clara 280 Ave M Sk ock mR xpy ol E pit Ca Rancho San Antonio aA ve ill Rd Sunnyvale Los Altos Upper Stevens Creek Joseph D. Grant cia iten Penreek Rd C Rd St rst 1O1 85 Penitencia Creek 880 Fi N. Mountain View 680 op Sunnyvale Baylands Milpitas Calaveras Reservoir eras R Ro Palo alo A Alto Ca l av d Alviso Marina
Caåm nang boû tuùi veà caùc Khu Coâng Vieân tuyeät ñeïp cuûa Quaän Santa Clara! chaøo möøng quyù vò Calero County Park ñeán vôùi caùc khu giaûi trí vaø coâng vieân cuûa Quaän Santa Clara. Heä thoáng caùc coâng vieân, ñöôøng moøn, hoà, suoái, vaø khoâng gian ngoaøi trôøi ñoâ thò vaø mieàn nuùi roäng 52,000 maãu naøy laø moät trong caùc heä thoáng coâng vieân ña daïng nhaát cuûa California. baûo veä Moâi tröôøng töï nhieân cuûa heä thoáng coâng vieân traûi daøi töø caùc ñaàm laày San Francisco Bay ñeán caùc khu röøng soài cuûa Diablo Range, ñeán caùc khu röøng tuøng baùch tuyeät ñeïp cuûa raëng nuùi Santa Cruz Mountains. baûo toàn Di saûn lòch söû vaên hoùa phong phuù cuûa Quaän, cuøng vôùi daáu aán taùc ñoäng cuûa caùc boä toäc Thoå Daân Chaâu Myõ Da Ñoû Ohlone, caùc nhaø thaùm hieåm ngöôøi Taây Ban Nha, vaø nhöõng ngöôøi Chaâu AÂu ñònh cö ñaàu tieân cuõng ñöôïc baûo toàn trong heä thoáng coâng vieân naøy. taän höôûng Cô sôû vaät chaát vaø caùc hoaït ñoäng giaûi trí cuûa heä thoáng Coâng Vieân Quaän goàm coù: • nhieàu daëm ñöôøng moøn ñi boä ñöôøng daøi, chaïy boä vaø ñi daïo • caùc baõi baén cung, baén suùng tröôøng, baén suùng luïc, baãy & baén boà caâu • khu toå hôïp saân boùng meàm coù möôøi saân • moät saân vaän ñoäng taàm côõ Olympic • khu caém traïi vaø picnic • löôùt vaùn vaø ñi thuyeàn buoàm • ñi xe ñaïp leo nuùi • caùc chöông trình bieåu dieãn ngheä thuaät • caùc hoaït ñoäng tình nguyeän • khu ñòa hình cho xe moâ-toâ • cöôõi ngöïa • hai saân golf • caém traïi duøng leàu • taøu löôïn • caâu caù 2 ñaøi thoï cho caùc khu coâng vieân Martial Cottle Park Santa Clara County Department of Parks and Recreation ñöôïc Hieán Chöông Thaønh Phoá, saéc leänh ñòa phöông vaø luaät tieåu bang uûy quyeàn quaûn lyù vaø mua ñaát coâng vieân trong quaän nhaèm phuïc vuï nhu caàu coâng vieân vaø giaûi trí cuûa caùc cö daân trong quaän. Keå töø naêm 1972, cöû tri Quaän Santa Clara ñaõ pheâ chuaån Quyõ Coâng Vieân theo Hieán Chöông (Park Charter Fund), moät tu chính aùn cuûa Hieán Chöông Quaän daønh rieâng moät phaàn quyõ toång quaùt cho hoaït ñoäng quaûn lyù vaø mua coâng vieân. Trong boán thaäp kyû qua, hôn 50,000 maãu ñaát coâng vieân ñaõ ñöôïc baûo veä taïi 28 coâng vieân khu vöïc - ít nhaát moät trong soá ñoù naèm caùch moãi thaønh phoá hoaëc thò traán trong quaän khoaûng 5 daëm. Ñeå tìm hieåu theâm veà Department of Parks and Recreation, vui loøng truy caäp website cuûa chuùng toâi taïi Parkhere.org. Cung caáp, baûo veä vaø baûo toàn caùc khu coâng vieân trong khu vöïc ñeå theá heä naøy vaø caùc theá heä mai sau taän höôûng, truyeàn ñaït kieán thöùc, vaø truyeàn caûm höùng. Söù meänh nhieäm vuï cuûa Department of Parks and Recreation. trôû thaønh tình nguyeän vieân Department of Parks and Recreation cung caáp nhieàu cô hoäi tình nguyeän ngaén haïn vaø daøi haïn. caùc cô hoäi tình nguyeän • Adopt-a-Trail hay Trail Watch • Toå chöùc caém traïi vaø cung caáp ñòa ñieåm • Dieãn thuyeát • Tröôûng Nhoùm Tình Nguyeän taïi Coâng Vieân • Tröôûng Nhoùm Giaùm Saùt Ñöôøng Moøn • Tham gia trôï giuùp trong caùc söï kieän ñaëc bieät Tìm hieåu theâm, ñaêng kyù ngay hoâm nay! Truy caäp website scc.samaritan.com ñeå laäp hoà sô tình nguyeän vieân cuûa quyù vò hoaëc truy caäp website Parkhere.org ñeå tuyeån choïn tình nguyeän vieân. Quyù vò coù theå tìm kieám theo coâng vieân, hoaït ñoäng, tình traïng coù saün vaø khoaûng caùch tính töø nhaø quyù vò; thaäm chí ñeà xuaát döï aùn rieâng cuûa quyù vò! Lieân laïc vôùi Chöông Trình Tình Nguyeän Vieân taïi Volunteer@prk.sccgov.org hoaëc 408-918-4930. 3 caùc vieän baûo taøng ... Casa Grande/New Almaden Quicksilver Mining Museum Haõy ñeán Casa Grande! Casa Grande, naèm trong National Historic Landmark District duy nhaát cuûa Quaän Santa Clara, baûo toàn di tích baõi ñaøo vaøng ñaàu tieân vaø phoàn thònh nhaát cuûa California, ñoàng thôøi giuùp chuùng ta bieát ñeán cuoäc soáng cuûa coäng ñoàng naøy caùch ñaây hôn 150 naêm. Tìm hieåu caùch thöùc ngöôøi daân söû duïng ñaù chu sa (cinnabar) vaø thuûy ngaân, coâng ngheä khai thaùc moû thay ñoåi nhö theá naøo theo thôøi gian, vaø ñòa ñieåm naøy ñoùng goùp cho thaønh coâng cuûa Côn Soát Vaøng California nhö theá naøo. Thaêm nhöõng caên phoøng coå xöa ñaày ñuœ ñoà ñaïc, cho thaáy moät thôøi Casa Grande töøng laø choán eâm ñeàm cuœa caùc quaœn lyù moœ vaøng vaø gia ñình hoï. Ñeå xeáp lòch heïn tham quan vaø daõ ngoaïi, vui loøng truy caäp website parkhere.org hoaëc goïi soá (408) 323-1107 ñeå bieát theâm chi tieát. Chitactac-Adams Heritage Park Tìm hieåu ñôøi soáng vaø loái soáng cuûa Thoå Daân Chaâu Myõ Da Ñoû ôû Quaän Santa Clara taïi khu coâng vieân di tích lòch söû vaên hoùa naøy. Chieâm ngöôõng caùc coå vaät vaø ñoà taïo taùc töø haøng ngaøn naêm tröôùc. Ngöôïc trôû veà thôøi tieàn söû khi ta khaùm phaù con ñöôøng moøn minh hoïa vaø tìm hieåu thieân nhieân ñaõ nuoâi soáng ngöôøi daân Amah Mutsan coå ñaïi nhö theá naøo ôû moät ngoâi laøng doïc theo Uvas Creek. Coù caùc chöông trình tham quan daønh cho nhoùm töø 10 ngöôøi trôû leân,
þ } | · 280 þ } | · Windy Hill OSP Skyline Ridge OSP Upper Stevens Creek Sunnyvale Baylands !! F #* È !! #̀ & d 5!!! ! [ £ ¤ 35 Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge Alviso MOUNTAIN VIEW LOS ALTOS HILLS 85 þ } | · LOS ALTOS Rancho San Antonio OSP Monte Bello OSP Stevens Creek SARATOGA 9 þ } | · 35 Sanborn F! ! #* È !` # ! MONTE SERENO Bear Creek OSP !> 5 !! {! | * F! ! È!` ! Lexington Reservoir 9 þ } | · 1 þ } | · CAMPBELL þ } | · Santa Cruz County 17 þ } | · 87 280 Villa Montalvo El Sereno OSP 17 130 þ } | · £ ¤ LOS GATOS !> [ !u !! :! 9é !! » ` * F! ! È!!! 5! 4 Big Basin State Park !! F È* !! # #̀ ã p 5!! ! Los Gatos Creek Martial Cottle F! ! È* !` ! ' Í !! F È* !O ` !! Ø 5! ! 4> !> !! #! | [ Hellyer ' Í! !! F È* !` !! Ø 5 * > = d !!!!! #! | 4 Vasona F! ! È* !` ! Santa Teresa A `! *! !! È! 5! ! 4u ! F !5 !! 4F !$ ! d !> !! [ u p "! |! ! # | Field Sports ! © 85 þ } | · Coyote Creek `! *! !! F È! 5 d! p! ! ¢! [ Almaden Quicksilver !! F È* !` ! k A !! 5! #> | ! F! ! È* !! # #̀ ! [k p > "! 5! ! 4! £! ¢! > !! #` | ! Chesbro Reservoir Uvas Canyon !! F #* È !` # ! u! ! 5! 4! :! 9 MORGAN HILL Uvas Reservoir 0 1.75 3.5 7 Miles County Boundary City Limits Hiking Access Equestrian Access Bicycling Access Dog On-leash Access Dog Off-leash Facility Interpretive Trail Archaeological Site Museum Playground Wildlife Viewing Fly k Catch & ! O Casting Fishing ! Release Pond Non-Motorized Boating Boating Access Water Skiing Rowing Sailing Henry Coe State Park 101 ! 5 4 ! 9 ! : ! ¼ ! » ! $ ! = ! F ! § ! p ! J ! © ! & ! ã ! * ! # ! ! Picnic Area Reservable Picnic Area Camping Group Camping RV Camping Sanitary Disposal Site Archery Range Disc Golf Course Golf Course Hang Gliding Model Airfield Motorcyle Access Shooting Range Softball/Baseball Fields Tennis Courts Velodrome No Access Operated by Private Club, Public Agency Lessee, or Concessionaire Coyote Lake Harvey Bear Ranch p "! F! ! È* !` !! £! ¢ £ ¤ Freeway é! >! 5! ! :! 9! »! [ Chitactac Adams u! °! ! #̀ ! 5 152 þ } | · !! F È* !` # !! 5! 4 u é !! :! 9!! »$ ! Activities allowed within each County Park may be limited to certain areas. Please check with the park office or www.parkhere.org for the latest information. Regional Road ` >! ! #! | Forest of Nisene Marks Wilder Ranch State Park Anderson Lake !! F È* !` # !! 5 p > " !! £! ¢ !! [! 4 Calero Canada de Oro OSP Sierra Azul OSP Motorcycle ! J Mt. Madonna Pacific Ocean ! F È ! * ! ` ! ' Í Ø ! u ! ° ! A ! d ! [ ! > ! | ! £ ! ¢ ! { ! p " ! þ } | · SAN JOSE 880 Operated by County Parks Operated by Other Agency !! F È* !` !! 5! 4 é > :! ! 9!! »! [!! # | F! ! È* !` !! 5d ! £ ¤ and Other Regional Parks & Open Space Joseph D. Grant Alum Rock City Park Penitencia Creek Rancho San Antonio 85 þ } | · 680 £ ¤ SUNNYVALE þ } | · Castle Rock State Park MILPITAS SANTA CLARA CUPERTINO F! ! È* !! #̀ |> ! !$ !! 5! 4 ` * F! ! È ! !! [ 237 þ } | · Marina !! F #* È !` ! 5! ! |! £! [ ¹ ' Í! !! F È* !` !! Ø 5! 4 u > F d !!! #!!! | §! : Santa Clara County Parks & Recreation Department Activities by Park ³³ PALO ALTO 84 Palo Alto Baylands Ed R. Levin ³³ San Mateo County Alameda County San Francisco Bay 101 £ ¤ 1 þ } | · 152 þ } | · 152 þ } | · GILROY 25 129 þ } | · Monterey County þ } | · San Benito County 156 þ } | · Merced County

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