State Indian Museum

State Historic Park - California

The California State Indian Museum is a museum interprets the diverse cultures of the indigenous peoples of California. It is located in midtown Sacramento. Just off of K street. The museum exhibits traditional items illustrating the varying cultures of the state's first inhabitants. The native population of California, one of the largest and most diverse in the Western hemisphere, was made up of over 150 distinct tribal groups who spoke at least 64 different languages. Prior to the arrival of the first European explorers, the native population is estimated to have been in excess of 500,000 people.

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Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mother Lode - Boundary Map

Boundary Map of the Mother Lode BLM Field Office in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=486 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_State_Indian_Museum The California State Indian Museum is a museum interprets the diverse cultures of the indigenous peoples of California. It is located in midtown Sacramento. Just off of K street. The museum exhibits traditional items illustrating the varying cultures of the state's first inhabitants. The native population of California, one of the largest and most diverse in the Western hemisphere, was made up of over 150 distinct tribal groups who spoke at least 64 different languages. Prior to the arrival of the first European explorers, the native population is estimated to have been in excess of 500,000 people.
State Indian Museum State Historic Park Our Mission The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. We want to know “ those who went before us and lived in harmony with the earth.” − Paul Douglas Campbell Pigment and Paint of the California Indians California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the museum at (916) 324-0971. This publication can be made available in alternate formats. Contact interp@parks.ca.gov or call (916) 654-2249. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ State Indian Museum State Historic Park 2618 K Street Sacramento, CA 95816 (916) 324-0971 www.parks.ca.gov/indianmuseum © 2014 California State Parks V isiting the State Indian Museum is an inspiring and memorable experience. Since 1940, this accessible landmark has presented items from many of California’s tribal groups, including an 18-foot Yurok redwood canoe, three one-millimeter-sized baskets by Pomo master weaver Mabel McKay, and paintings by the late Maidu artist Harry Fonseca. The State Indian Museum tells the story of California’s first inhabitants. More than 60 indigenous groups, with multiple smaller bands speaking more than 300 dialects, existed here before the Spanish explorers and settlers arrived — many years before the Gold Rush. The museum honors them and their understanding and use of natural resources. Visitors also learn about today’s native people — where they live and how they make California their home in the 21st century. Native Americans are not just part of past history, but they continue to be an important and vital part of what makes California diverse and whole. A variety of California native plants grows in the area surrounding the museum. Among the many indigenous species here are soaproot — used for centuries for making brushes and as a washing agent , and tule — used to fashion baskets, homes, boats and mats. CALIFORNIA INDIAN HISTORY Indian people inhabited California long before recorded history. The territory that is now California was “discovered” many times through the centuries, by various travelers by land and sea. The exploratory period of the 1500s brought the first recorded outsiders, who claimed riches and land for their own countries as they introduced such contagious diseases as malaria and smallpox. Disease took many California Indian lives, often killing entire village populations. “Coyote Dancer” by Harry Fonseca The mission period and the Spanish/ American Era in the late 18th and early 19th centuries ushered in Spanish missionaries, who built 21 missions in California. They attempted to claim the land and destroy native culture by “converting” Indian people to Catholicism. Upper or Alta California was governed by Mexico for a short time before becoming a state in 1850. With the discovery of gold in 1849, thousands of outsiders brought still more disease and devastation to California’s native people, along with destruction of the landscape and natural environment. Indian people died from hunger, disease, displacement and violence. The Native California Indian population was reduced by 90% in less than 50 years; their ways of life were negatively and irreparably changed. The continuous onslaught of foreigners into “California Indian Country” had long-term effects on California Indians. Attempts by Loom with Washoe basket and beads Bone fishing tools, circa 1500 AD governments and religious orders to assert power and acquire land and resources led to the loss of freedom for many Indian people, destroying a complex, sophisticated way of life. Tribal peoples, whose culture was inextricably interwoven with nature, were brutally exploited and abused. The federal government signed eighteen treaties with California tribal groups. In order to secure much-needed goods and services for their starving people, native leaders often signed the treaties under duress. None of California’s treaties were ever ratified, and very few of the treaty conditions were ever honored. CALIFORNIA’S UNIQUE CULTURE The diverse California Indian cultures have many distinctive qualities. • California Indian culture is ancient. Archaeological evidence tells us that people have been here for as long as 14,000 years, but Indian creation stories tell us that they have always been here. • California Indians have an ancient spiritual relationship with the land — everyone and everything is connected. Most native people hunted and gathered; others managed both wild and cultivated foods using “selfsu
Important Information • Chaperones must stay with students at all times. • No food, beverages or gum inside any of the sites. • Park staff reserves the right to cancel groups arriving more than 10 minutes after the scheduled arrival time. • Groups without reservations are admitted on a space available basis. Payments for admission by check or cash only. Holding capacities strictly enforced. Our Mission The Mission of the California Department of Parks and Recreation is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the states’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high quality outdoor recreation. California State Parks Historic Sites Visitor Information Guide • Commercial tour companies will be charged regular admission price at the park where applicable. • School groups with reservations will be admitted free of charge at all venues unless otherwise noted. • Requests for special assistance for persons with disabilities should be identified when making reservations with Reserve America. • Due to the number of no-shows at the Historic Sites venues, groups that fail to show for a reserved venue will be invoiced $25.00 per no show. • Fees subject to change. School group reservations call toll free: (866) 2404655 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., 7 days a week Pacific Standard Time. Commercial group reservations call toll free:(866) 361-5111 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. M-F. For additional site information, maps and teacher background materials, Visit the California State Parks Website at: www.parks.ca.gov. HISTORIC STATE PARK SITES STATE CAPITOL MUSEUM 10th and L Street Guided tours provide an understanding of California’s complex and dynamic legislature. In addition, the guides interpret the Capitol’s history, architecture and symbols. Historic offices offer a glimpse into the Capitol’s past and museum rooms convey a perspective on current issues. Maximum 35 people. Wheelchair accessible. Listening devices upon request. (1 hr - Guided Tour) LELAND STANFORD MANSION 4th – 12th grades only. Leland Stanford Mansion State Historic Park, a National Historic Landmark, was the 19th century home of Leland and Jane Stanford. Today the Mansion welcomes leaders from around the world as the State’s official reception center and public museum. Allow 30 minutes for this guided tour. There are adult and youth fees; children five and under are free. For more information, call (916) 3246088 or (916) 324-0575 and press 03. THE CALIFORNIA MUSEUM FOR HISTORY, WOMEN AND THE ARTS The California Museum offers fun and educational programs and tours. Students have the opportunity to learn about California and the nation through the gallery-based programs. Developed by an experienced educator with specific reference to California’s curriculum standards, the Museum offers a range of resources California State Parks does not discriminate against individuals with disabilities. To receive this publication in an alternate format contact the California State Parks Concessions & Reservations Division at (916) 653-7733. CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P.O. BOX 942896 SACRAMENTO, CA 94296-0001 For Information Call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, Outside the U.S. (888) 877-5738, TTY (888) 877-5379, Without TTY www.parks.ca.gov Cover photo: Marshall Gold Discovery SHP © 2009 California State Parks for discovery and learning to classroom teachers. These resources are provided in a ready format that encourages and supports the efforts of teachers in addressing the natural and cultural diversity of California, the growth of the world-class economy, and the workings of our democracy. The Museum features exhibits on pioneering families, California Mission art, and the Remarkable Women Series with Latinas: the Spirit of California. For more information on our current exhibits, check our website at www. californiamuseum.org. CALIFORNIA STATE INDIAN MUSEUM 26th & K Street The museum displays a comprehensive collection of artifacts relating to California Indian culture. Wheelchair accessible. Groups without reservations are admitted on a space available basis. Carrying capacity enforced. (30 min Self-guided Tour) for 2nd floor of Central Building. (1 hr - Sound-Assisted, Self-guided Tour) GOVERNOR’S MANSION SHP 16th & H Street Elegant Victorian mansion built in 1877. Former home to California’s governors from John Pardee through Ronald Reagan. No strollers allowed. Due to limited holding capacity, large drop-in groups not advised. Wheelchair lift available. For information regarding this site, call (916) 323-3047. (40 min - Guided Tour) MARSHALL GOLD DISCOVERY SHP Highway 49 in Coloma This is the site of the discovery at Sutter’s MiII that triggered the California Gold Rush. Groups with a valid reservation must check in at the park entrance within an hour before or after their scheduled arrival time. For Bekeart’s gold California

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