Sugarloaf Ridge

State Park - California

Sugarloaf Ridge State Park in Northern Californiais located in the Mayacamas Mountains north of Kenwood. The park straddles the boundary between Sonoma and Napa counties. The park contains the 2,729 feet (832 m) Bald Mountain and the headwaters of Sonoma Creek including a 25-foot (8 m) tall seasonal waterfall. The park is also home to the volunteer-run Robert Ferguson Observatory. Camping, picnicking, horseback riding, mountain biking, stargazing, fishing and hiking are common attractions of Sugarloaf. The park boasts 25 miles of trails with trails ranging from less than a mile to 8.8 miles, and elevation gains reaching 2,500 feet. The ridge has two main peaks, the western one being 1,939 feet (591 m) above sea level and eastern one being 2,265 feet (690 m).

maps

Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM). Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS)Berryessa Snow Mountain - Recreation Map

Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM). Published by the U.S. National Forest Service (USFS)

Visitor Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Berryessa Snow Mountain - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=481 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugarloaf_Ridge_State_Park Sugarloaf Ridge State Park in Northern Californiais located in the Mayacamas Mountains north of Kenwood. The park straddles the boundary between Sonoma and Napa counties. The park contains the 2,729 feet (832 m) Bald Mountain and the headwaters of Sonoma Creek including a 25-foot (8 m) tall seasonal waterfall. The park is also home to the volunteer-run Robert Ferguson Observatory. Camping, picnicking, horseback riding, mountain biking, stargazing, fishing and hiking are common attractions of Sugarloaf. The park boasts 25 miles of trails with trails ranging from less than a mile to 8.8 miles, and elevation gains reaching 2,500 feet. The ridge has two main peaks, the western one being 1,939 feet (591 m) above sea level and eastern one being 2,265 feet (690 m).
Our Mission Sugarloaf Ridge State Park The mission of California State Parks is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. A rough smack of “ resin was in the air, and a crystal mountain purity . . . There are days in a life when thus to climb out of the California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (707) 833-5712. This publication is available in alternate formats by contacting: CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P. O. Box 942896 Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 (916) 653-6995, outside the U.S. 711, TTY relay service www.parks.ca.gov Sugarloaf Ridge State Park 2605 Adobe Canyon Road Kenwood, CA 95452-9004 (707) 833-5712 (707) 938-1519 (District Headquarters) www.parks.sonoma.net Photos on cover and inside panel courtesy of Diane Askew © 1992 California State Parks (Rev. 2009) Printed on Recycled Paper lowlands seems like scaling heaven.” —Robert Louis Stevenson S ugarloaf Ridge State points from the slopes Park is named for the shape of Mount Saint Helena. of the ridge at its southern They traveled to the edge. In the 1800s, sugar coast to gather salt, was molded into coneseashells and seaweed, shaped loaves; many hills and traded with the and mountains with a conical Pomo people for items shape were whimsically not available locally. called “sugarloaf.” The Perhaps 1,500 years 4,020-acre park is located ago, the Wappo settled northeast of Kenwood in in the Alexander Valley Valley view from Bald Mountain the Mayacamas Mountains area, building their between the lush Sonoma and Napa valleys. homes from local materials. Their social structure Elevations in the park range from 600 feet at the included chiefs who acted much like consultants entrance to 2,729 feet at the top of Bald Mountain, with expertise in specific areas. For instance, if overlooking the Napa Valley and Mount Saint someone had a health problem, a chief would Helena to the north. On clear days, you can see consult someone with experience in medicinal the Golden Gate Bridge and the Sierra Nevada cures. Family ties were of vital importance to the from Bald Mountain’s summit. Wappo, and they held their elders and children in Temperatures during spring and fall are mild. high regard. The wettest months­—from November to April— The Wappo village, called Wilikos, was located can bring 30 to 40 inches of rain. Wintertime lows along the upper reaches of Sonoma Creek before can drop into the 20s, but daytime highs average the first Spanish settlers came. Acorn grinding 50s and 60s. Summer is hot and dry, often in the rocks can be seen locally. Accomplished artisans 90s, cooling to the 40s in the evenings. Wear a hat, and excellent resource managers, the Wappo were and bring drinking water. known for their fine basketry and their expertise in Along the creek near the entrance to the farming techniques. campground, the visitor center provides general information and a guide to the park’s natural and cultural history. When the Spaniards first tried to take their lands and resources, ca. 1823, the Wappo successfully resisted. Before long, however, the people were forcibly moved from their traditional lands to reservations, where they lived with other native groups. Despite their strongest efforts to retain their identity, Wappo culture and language were largely lost. Today some Wappo descendants are Wappo bead basket making an effort to Photo courtesy of Phoebe A. Hearst revive their spoken Museum of Anthropology and the language. Regents of the University of California Natural History The park encompasses three distinct ecological systems: chaparral-covered ridges, oak/fir woodland along the open meadows, and redwood forest in the Sonoma Creek canyon. Big-leaf maples, madrone, California laurels, gray pines and alders also grow here. California lilacs, coyote bush, toyon, and winebush make up some of the chaparral community. As you hike, watch out for poison oak and, along the creek, stinging nettles. PARK HISTORY Native People Anthropologists believe that the Wappo people are one of the oldest native California groups, descended from the first people to settle here. For thousands of years, they led fairly stable lives on lands that produced everything they needed to thrive. The Wappo gathered obsidian for arrow Panoramic view of Sugarloaf Ridge Photo courtesy of Diane Askew Photo courtesy of Diane Askew Canyon Trail waterfall Sonoma Creek begins in the park and runs for three miles through its southern portion. The creek is not deep enough for swimming and often dries up by late summer. Following the winter rains, a picturesque 25-foot waterfall flows along Sonoma Creek below the campground. In the
Wel ! come Sugarloaf Ridge State Park 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd., Kenwood, CA 95452 • (707) 833-5712 We hope you enjoy your visit to Sugarloaf Ridge State Park. Check with the park staff for the brochure that describes the story of how the park got its name. SUGARLOAF RIDGE STATE PARK offers 49 developed family campsites, a group camp, picnic sites, and trails. The mountain terrain of the 4900acre park has elevations from 600 to 2729 feet. The camp and picnic sites are set in a large valley with a meadow and stream at 1200 feet. Favorite activities include camping, resting, hiking, nature exploration and horseback riding. CAMPSITES must be paid for in advance. To hold a campsite you must reserve it or occupy it. To prevent encroachment on others, the limits of each campsite may be regulated by park staff. Camping fees cover one vehicle per campsite. Additional fees will be charged for more than one vehicle. Check-in time is 2 p.m. Check-out time is noon. CAMPING REGULATIONS: 8 person maximum per campsite. Maximum trailer length 24’ (RV 27’) CAMPING LIMIT: In order to accommodate the greatest number of visitors possible, the camping limit in this campground is limited to 7 consecutive days, and 30 days per calendar year. LOUD NOISES are prohibited at all times. Quiet time is between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. During these hours, talking and noise should not be heard outside of your campsite. Engine-driven electric generators may be operated only between the hours of 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. VEHICLES: All vehicle travel must be confined to designated roads or parking areas. Please obey all traffic signs. The speed limit for vehicles is 15 mph in the park unless otherwise posted. All vehicles and drivers must be licensed and all rules of the road apply. Parking is permitted only in designated areas. Blocking parking spaces is prohibited. DEAD AND DOWN WOOD is part of the natural environment. Decayed vegetation forms humus, which assists the growth of trees and other plants. For this reason the gathering of down wood is prohibited. (When considered a hazard, down wood is removed by park personnel) FIREWOOD is sold in the park for your convenience. Please do not cut any bushes, trees or tables for firewood. Ask the park staff where firewood is available for purchase. FIRES: To prevent wildfires, fires are permitted only in facilities provided for this purpose. Portable stoves may be used in designated areas. It is the responsibility of every visitor to use extreme caution with any burning materials, including tobacco. All fireworks are prohibited. Fires must be attended at all times and completely extinguished before you vacate your campsite. HORSEBACK RIDING: Within the oak woodland and chaparral, the park has 25 miles of trails for hiking and horseback riding. You may bring your own horse or make a reservation for a guided ride. A horseback riding concession is available during the spring, summer and fall. Reservations for guided rides can be made through the Triple Creek Horse Outfit: (707) 887-8700. Discover the many states of California.TM © 2007, California State Parks DOGS and other pets must be under control and on a leash no longer than six feet at all times. They are prohibited on all trails/backcountry except in designated areas. They must be kept inside tents or vehicles during nighttime hours. You must pick up after your pet. REFUSE, including garbage, cigarettes, paper, boxes, and bottles must be placed only in designated receptacles. There are recycle bins for aluminum, plastic and glass. Please clean up after yourself so that others may enjoy the beauty of this park. ARTICLES such as hammocks clothes lines and tarps are not to be tied to or hung from trees. JUVENILES will not be allowed to camp without a parent or legal guardian. You must be 18 years of age or older to camp unless accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. If you are under 21 years of age, you may not possess alcoholic beverages. LEGEND CH Camp Host Campfire Center Group Camp Sugarloaf Ridge State Park Campground Parking Your site #: __________ Picnic Area Restrooms ny Po Telephone il Tra il Stern Trai l Gate Water Spigots tain Tra Moun r we o L Day Use Lot ld Ba Observatory Entrance Station Visitor Center 1 2 3 4 48 49 46 45 e On 47 50 5 6 W ay One 44 43 42 41 40 7 8 Wa y 39 38 37 36 35 For emergencies call 9 10 Cr 13 14 15 30 29 16 34 33 32 CH 17 18 19 9-1-1 Horse Concession Service 11 12 20 21 22 ee ks 23 ide Natu re Trail 24 25 28 27 26 CAMPING RESERVATIONS: The reservation period is from March 15 through October 31. First-come, first-serve camping is from November 1 through March 14. You may make camping reservations up to seven months and no less than 48 hours in advance by calling 1-800-444-7275 (TTY 1-800-274-7275). Charge your reservations to your VISA®, Discover® or MasterCard®. To make online reservations, visit our website at www.parks.ca.gov.

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