William B. Ide Adobe

State Historic Park - California

William B. Ide Adobe State Historic Park is a California State Historic Park located on the west bank of the Sacramento River, a mile north of Red Bluff in Tehama County, California. It is in the Sacramento Valley of Northern California. The park memorializes William Brown Ide, a California pioneer, captain of the Bear Flag Revolt and the only president of the California Republic, which lasted from June 14 to July 9, 1846.

maps

Overview Map of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Sacramento NWR Complex - Overview Map

Overview Map of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (NWR) in California. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of the Nobles Emigrant Trail section, part of the California National Historic Trail (NHT), located outside of Susanville, California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Nobles Emigrant Trail - Trail Map

Map of the Nobles Emigrant Trail section, part of the California National Historic Trail (NHT), located outside of Susanville, California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=458 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_B._Ide_Adobe_State_Historic_Park William B. Ide Adobe State Historic Park is a California State Historic Park located on the west bank of the Sacramento River, a mile north of Red Bluff in Tehama County, California. It is in the Sacramento Valley of Northern California. The park memorializes William Brown Ide, a California pioneer, captain of the Bear Flag Revolt and the only president of the California Republic, which lasted from June 14 to July 9, 1846.
William B. Ide Adobe State Historic Park Our Mission The mission of the California Department of Parks and Recreation is to provide for the health, inspiration and education of the people of California by helping to preserve the state’s extraordinary biological diversity, protecting its most valued natural and cultural resources, and creating opportunities for high-quality outdoor recreation. Escape back in time and experience the sights and sounds of the California frontier at an 1852 adobe California State Parks supports equal access. Prior to arrival, visitors with disabilities who need assistance should contact the park at (530) 529-8599. This publication is available in alternate formats by contacting: CALIFORNIA STATE PARKS P. O.many Box 942896 Discover the states of California.™ Sacramento, CA 94296-0001 For information call: (800) 777-0369 Discover the manyoutside states the of California.™ (916) 653-6995, U.S. 711, TTY relay service Discover the many states of California.™ www.parks.ca.gov Discover the many states of California.™ William B. Ide Adobe SHP 21659 Adobe Road Red Bluff, CA 96080 (530) 529-8599 © 2008 California State Parks Printed on Recycled Paper homestead overlooking the banks of the peaceful Sacramento River. A t the northern end of Settlers The first non-native the Sacramento Valley, settlers arrived in the flanked by the Cascade northern Sacramento Mountains on the east Valley in the 1840s. and the Coast Range on Two Mexican land the west, William B. Ide grants downriver Adobe State Historic Park from this area were stands as a memorial awarded to Peter to one of the leading Lassen and Josiah participants in the Bear Cottonwood Trail along the Sacramento River Belden, who later sold Flag Revolt. The park, out to Massachusetts native William B. Ide. nestled along the banks of the Sacramento River 100 miles north of Sacramento, is a William B. Ide and the Bear Flag Revolt symphony of wildlife sounds and gentle With very little formal education, and winds rustling through aged oaks. You can trained as a carpenter, William B. Ide (1796enjoy a picnic by the river, saunter through 1852) followed the frontier as it gradually the historic homestead or attend an exciting moved westward. He and his family joined living history event. a wagon train headed for Alta California, still PARK HISTORY Native People When California was part of Mexico in 1821, explorer Luis Arguello led the first recorded expedition up the Sacramento River. The first people his party encountered were the Wintuan-speaking Nomlaki. Arguello’s diary describes Nomlaki villages where men hunted with sinew-backed bows and obsidian arrows, building weirs and using harpoons for river fishing. The Nomlaki women wove exquisite baskets, using the three-rod coil and twined methods. In 1883 later explorers unwittingly brought a malaria epidemic, decimating the native population. Though the explorers later took over Nomlaki lands, Nomlaki descendants still live in Northern California today. a province of Mexico. They arrived at John A. Sutter’s fort on October 25, 1845, then traveled north to this area. During that winter, a rumor spread that the Mexican government planned to evict illegal American settlers. In June of 1846, the settlers heard what proved to be a false rumor—a Mexican military force was on its way, destroying crops, burning houses and driving away cattle. This rallied the settlers into action, and on June 14, 1846, a group of about thirty men— including Ide—marched on the town of Sonoma. The group became known as the Bear Flaggers. Sonoma and its leading citizen, General Mariano G. Vallejo, were taken without incident. The Bear Flaggers, lacking leadership, could not agree on their next steps. They divided; some took their captives to Sutter’s fort. Those remaining in Sonoma selected Ide as their commander. Ide drafted a proclamation declaring the newly formed “California Republic.” Though the California Republic lasted only 25 days before Navy Commodore John D. Sloat raised the American flag at Monterey, this important chapter of California history is still known as the “Bear Flag Revolt.” Bluffton Ranch Like William B. Ide, the pioneer owners of the property originally called Bluffton Ranch arrived in California with visions of opportunity. Faced with challenges, they used their location near the CaliforniaOregon Road and the Sacramento River to form communication and transportation connections to the outside world. Pack trains, horsemen, miners on foot, ox teams, covered wagons and stagecoaches moved up and down the valley, and steamboats moved along the river. In 1862 a ferry crossing was built on the property. The park today reflects the hard work of those pioneers who lived in mid-19th-century California. Sacramento River ferry operator, late 1800s The Adobe Becomes observers may glimpse a State Park majestic bald eagles. The adobe was built The river supports four in 1852 by A. M. runs of Chi

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