Uncompahgre

Teluride Area Trails

brochure Uncompahgre - Teluride Area Trails
JUD WIEBE: Built together by the town of Telluride and the Forest Service in 1987, this short but steep trail was designed and named after the late Jud Wiebe (a Forest Service Recreation Manager). He passed away in 1986 before the trail’s completion. This trail begins in Telluride at the top of Aspen Street and ends at the Tomboy Road. The trail climbs on either end then contours through an aspen forest. Most views from this trail are of Telluride and the ski area. This is a family friendly trail and a favorite among local people. Trail length: 2.7 miles. Open to: hikers, horses (to the Deep Creek Trail intersection from the trailhead) and mountain bikers. Lupine and Paintbrush SNEFFELS HIGH LINE: This trail is one of the most challenging and rewarding day hikes in the area. It climbs up into the high country of the Mount Sneffels Wilderness above timberline. It passes by old cabin ruins, mines and streams. When planning this hike, get any early start to avoid afternoon thunderstorms in the summer. The eastern access for this trail is from the Jud Wiebe trailhead at the top of Aspen Street. The western access for this trail is from the Mill Creek Road. From Telluride drive 1 mile west on Highway 145 to Forest Service Road 637 (Mill Creek Road) near the Shell gas station. Turn right on Mill Creek Road and follow it approximately 1.5 miles to the Telluride Town reservoir. This is a high clearance road not recommended for passenger cars. There is parking near the reservoir. Trail length: 8.5 miles. Open to: hikers and horses. DEEP CREEK: This is a good trail for early and late season hiking due to its southern exposure and lower elevation. There are some steep sections on either end of the trail. It is located almost entirely in aspen timber with a few scattered spruce and fir stands. The trail has panoramic views of the ski area and the San Juan Mountains. Waterfalls can be seen along the east end of the trail in the Mill Creek Basin. To get to the eastern trail access from Telluride drive west 1 mile on Highway 145 to Forest Service Road 637 (Mill Creek Road) near the Shell gas station. Turn right on Mill Creek Road and follow it approximately 1.5 miles to the Telluride Town reservoir. This is a high clearance road not recommended for passenger cars. There is parking near the reservoir. To get to the western access for this trail from Telluride drive west 2.5 miles on Highway 145 to Forest Road 638 (Last Dollar Road). Turn right on Last Dollar Road and follow the road for about 3 miles. Turn right to enter the trailhead parking lot. This trail receives heavy bike use. Hikers use caution. Bikers please yield to hikers and horses. . Trail length: 12 miles. Open to: hikers, horses and mountain bikers. Telluride drive west about 8 miles. Turn left on the Fall Creek Road (County Road 57P). Follow this road for about 9 miles. The trailhead is on the left before Woods Lake Campground. Trail length: 10.5 miles. Open to: hikers, horses and seasonal motorcycle use July 1 through Labor Day. EIDER CREEK: This short spur trail connects to the Deep Creek Trail. The trail climbs steeply for 2 miles, and then intersects the Deep Creek Trail. From Telluride drive 1 mile west on Highway 145. Turn right on Forest Road 637 (Mill Creek Road) near the Shell gas station. This dirt road is high clearance and not recommended for passenger cars. Drive about .5 mile to the first hairpin turn. This is the trailhead. Trail length: 1.6 miles. Open to: hikers, horses and mountain bikers. GALLOPING GOOSE: Most of this trail follows the old Rio Grande Southern Railroad from Lizard Head Pass to Society Turn near Telluride. This route once had over 140 bridges and trestles, of which only one remains today. Incredible views of mountain peaks, old historic structures and scenic lakes and streams await those who venture out on this trail. Portions of this trail share forest and county roads. Other sections have steep grades and get light use. The trail is marked by the Galloping Goose logo beginning at Lizard Head Pass. This popular mountain biking trail can be done in sections or in its entirety. It offers a challenge without being overly technical. To get to the trailhead at Lizard Head Pass from Telluride drive about 3 miles to Highway 145 (Society Turn). Turn left heading south for about 11 miles to Lizard Head Pass. There is a rest area and interpretive site on the right side of the highway. The trailhead is on the left side of the highway on Forest Service Road 626. Trail length: 16.5 miles. Open to: hikers, horses and mountain bikers. WILSON MESA: This is a good trail for early season access and late fall color. It is primarily in spruce and fir with some aspen and a few small open parks. There are several small stream crossings and wetlands to navigate. The trail borders the Lizard Head Wilderness area for almost the entire length. This trail receives a lot of motorcycle use during the summer since it is the only motorized trail in the Telluride area. There are several access points for this trail. Sunshine Mesa access: From Telluride drive west about 5 miles. Turn south off Highway 145 on to the South Fork Road (County Road 63L). Go 2.5 miles to the Ilium Church Camp. Turn right on to Forest Service Road 623. Travel about 4.5 miles on this road to get to the trailhead. Silver Pick Road access: From Telluride drive west about 8 miles. Turn left on Silver Pick Road (County Road 60M). Follow this road for about 6.8 miles to the intersection of Forest Service Road 645 (Big Bear Road). The trail heads east and west from this point. Woods Lake access: From 1.5 miles. Look for the trail sign on your right. Trail length: 8.5 miles from Bear Creek Trail to Bridal Veil Powerhouse. Open to: hikers, horses, mountain bikers. PROSPECT: This is one of the most challenging single-track trails in the area. It traverses through spruce and fir as it contours along steep mountain slopes and scree fields. From the San Sofia Nature Center, follow the Village Trail for about ¼ mile. The Prospect Trail veers left off the Village. Trail length: 9.1 miles. Open to: hikers, horses and mountain bikers. Telluride Area Trails Uncompahgre National Forest Norwood Ranger District VILLAGE: This trail descends through aspen, spruce and fir as it traverses across ski runs and slopes. It offers expansive western views. Look for the trailhead sign across from the San Sofia Nature Center in Mountain Village. Trail length: 3 miles. Open to: hikers, horses and mountain bikers Hope Lake HOPE LAKE: Hope Lake is a man-made lake, which stores water for the Ames Power Plant. Snow generally melts late in the lake basin, often in July. This trail climbs through a spruce and fir forest with abundant wildflowers. There are several stream crossings to navigate. It tops out above timberline to Hope Lake. This trail is very popular because of the scenic beauty. From Telluride, travel west out of town about 3 miles to Society Turn. Turn left on Highway 145. Stay on the highway for about 10 miles. Turn left at the Trout Lake sign on to Forest Service Road 626. Follow the road around the northeast shore of the lake for one mile to Forest Service Road 627. Turn left. This road is recommended for high clearance vehicles only. Follow the road for about 2.5 miles to the Hope Lake trailhead. Trail length: 2.5 miles to Hope Lake, 3 miles to the pass. Open to: hikers, horses and mountain bikers. WASATCH TO BRIDAL VEIL: This is a steep trail that leads into the backcountry just outside of Telluride. It was originally constructed for mule trains to haul ore from the Nellie Mine. Much of the trail is above timberline and should be avoided during thunderstorms. From the trailhead the trail climbs about 3 miles to 13,000 feet reaching the divide between Bear Creek and Bridal Veil Creek. It continues on in to Bridal Veil Basin and ends at Forest Service Road 648 (Black Bear Pass Road) near the Bridal Veil Powerhouse. The road goes down to the Idarado Mine and in to Telluride. Signing is minimal on this trail. Make sure you carry a good map. From South Pine Street in Telluride head south to Bear Creek Road 635 (Bear Creek Trail). Follow the Bear Creek Trail for about Village Trail LIZARD HEAD: Initially this trail climbs steeply in to the Lizard Head Wilderness through spruce and fir and up to Blackface Ridge. Far reaching views of the San Juan Mountains can be seen from this vantage. A good portion of this trail is above timberline and exposed to lightning during thunderstorms. Eventually the trail contours directly under Lizard Head Peak, which is a prominent rock feature standing by itself at 13,113 feet. At this point there is a trail junction with the Cross Mountain trail and the Bilk Basin section of the Lizard Head trail. This is a strenuous hike rewarded by incredible scenic beauty. From Telluride drive about 3 miles to Highway 145 (Society Turn). Turn left heading south for about 11 miles to Lizard Head Pass. There is a rest area and interpretive site on the right side of the highway. Turn in to the rest area. The trailhead is above the main parking area on the right. Trail length: Lizard Head to Cross Mountain 9 miles. Lizard Head to Wilson Mesa (Bilk Creek) 10 miles. Open to: hiker and horses. The scenic Telluride Valley is a gateway to the Uncompahgre National Forest. The panoramic mountain views of the area are captivating. There are vast opportunities for the recreation enthusiast. Telluride sits at 8,750 feet so aerobic activity can be challenging. When recreating, give your body time to acclimate to the area, stay hydrated, take extra food and clothing, carry a map, practice good trail ethics, be safe and enjoy yourself. Summer time thunderstorms are common in the high country. Plan to hike early to avoid afternoon storms and lightning. If caught in lightning seek shelter and stay away from ridge tops, chair lifts, power lines and signposts. Let someone know where you are going and when you expect to return. Call 911 in case of emergency. TH 145 £ ¤ Whipple Trail Q R Deep Creek Trail Q R M44 638 R Q ' TH Sneffels Highline Trail Eider Creek Trail 57P Q R 60M TH Village Trail 5 ! Q R ! Lone Cone Trail ! TH ! ! ! Woods Lake Trail ! ! ! ! ! Prospect Trail 9 ! 625 ' TH Wilson Mesa Trail Trails HIKER/FOOT TRAVEL PACK AND SADDLE ! 9 9 ! Galloping Goose Trail MOUNTAIN BIKE ! ! MOTORCYCLE £ ¤ SEASONAL MOTORCYCLE USE 550 JULY 1 THROUGH LABOR DAY Roads HIGH CLEARANCE VEHICLES Lizard Head Wilderness Lizard Head Trail Cross Moutain Trail 145 £ ¤ 0 TH 9 Q R! Wilson Meadows Trail Navajo Trail / ! Wilson Mesa Trail Elk Creek Trail San Juan National Forest Telluride ' ! !! 9 ! ' ! ! 5 ! ! ! TH Wasatch Trail 648 622 ' Jud Wiebe Trail ' ! Norwood Ranger District 1150 Forest Street Norwood, CO 81423 Phone: 970-327-4261 www.fs.fed.us/r2/gmug/ Uncompahgre National Forest ' ! CONTACT INFORMATION Sneffels Wilderness ! LONE CONE: This trail leads from Woods Lake Campground to Forest Service Road 611 near the Lone Cone Guard Station. It climbs through aspen, spruce and fir and enters the Lizard Head Wilderness. Views of the Wilson Peak area, Dolores Peak and Lone Cone can be seen along the trail. This is a great trail to view fall color. To get to the trailhead from Telluride drive west about 8 miles. Turn left on the Fall Creek Road (County Road 57P). Follow this road for about 9 miles. Turn right at the main entrance to Woods Lake Campground. Just beyond the campground host site is a parking area on the right. Look for the trail near the parking area. Trail length: 10.5 miles. Open to: hikers and horses. Alder Creek Trail ! ELK CREEK: This trail is one of the routes into Navajo Basin and the Lizard Head Wilderness. Most of it follows an old mining road that climbs up in to the wilderness. It is a popular trail used by hunters in the fall. There are several access points for the trail. From Telluride drive west about 8 miles. Turn left on the Silver Pick Road (County Road 60M). Follow this road for about 6.8 miles to the intersection of Forest Service Road 645 (Big Bear Road). Turn right on Forest Service Road 645. The trailhead is at the end of this road about 2 miles. Forest Service Road 645 will be closed for summer season of 2009 for road and trail maintenance. Wilson Mesa access: From Telluride drive west about 8 miles. Turn left on the Fall Creek Road (County Road 57P). Follow this road for about 9 miles to the Wilson Mesa trailhead on the left. Follow this trail for approxi- ALDER CREEK: This trail is primarily in spruce and fir and enters the Mount Sneffels Wilderness area. It contours from Last Dollar Pass towards Hayden and North Pole Peaks. It eventually becomes the Dallas Trail. In its entirety, it ends just outside the town of Ridgway. This trail doesn’t get a lot of use during the summer season. It does get heavier use by hunters in the fall. To get to this trail from Telluride travel west on Highway 145, 2.5 miles to Forest Road 638 (Last Dollar Road). Turn right on Last Dollar Road and follow the road for about 10 miles. This road becomes rough after the first 5 miles and is very slippery when wet. High clearance vehicle use is recommended. The trailhead is on the right side of the road. There is a small parking area at the trailhead. Trail length: 5.5 miles. Open to: hikers and horses 62 £ ¤ ! WOODS LAKE: This trail is one of the many used to get to Navajo Basin in the Lizard Head Wilderness. It climbs through spruce and fir for the first two miles. Western views of Lone Cone and the La Sal Mountains in Utah can be seen above tree line at Elk Creek junction. Continuing to Navajo Lake is well worth the hike. There are primitive campsites at the lake. Campfires are not allowed in Navajo Basin due to high visitor use. Wilson Peak, Mount Wilson and El Diente are three 14,000 foot peaks in the area. This trail gets a lot of horse use. Hikers yield to horses. Step to the downhill side of the trail. To get to the trailhead from Telluride drive west about 8 miles. Turn left on the Fall Creek Road (County Road 57P). Follow this road for about 9 miles. The trailhead is on the left at the main entrance to Woods Lake Campgro und. Trail length to Navajo Lake: 4 miles. Open to: hikers and horses. WHIPPLE: This trail offers spectacular views of the Wilson Peak area and the La Sal Mountains in Eastern Utah. It enters the Mount Sneffels Wilderness and eventually ties in with the Deep Creek trail. Initially the trail starts out in aspen and climbs up through the spruce and fir. Sheep grazing is permitted in this area. To get to this trail from Telluride travel west, 2.5 miles on Highway 145, to Forest Road 638 (Last Dollar Road). Turn right on Last Dollar Road and follow the road for about 9.5 miles. This road becomes rough after the first 5 miles and is very slippery when wet. High clearance vehicle use is recommended. The trailhead is on the right side of the road. There is a small parking area at the trailhead. Trail length: 4 miles. Open to: hikers and horses. 638 !! Trail length: 1.5 miles. Open to: hikers and horses. Q R TELLURIDE AREA TRAILS ! Larkspur and waterfall mately 3 miles to the Elk Creek trail intersection. Trail length: 3.6 miles. Open to: hikers and horses. ! WILSON MEADOWS: This is a spur trail off the Lizard Head trail. Follow Lizard Head trail for about 2 miles. There will be a trail junction on the right. The trail leads to a lush meadow popular with hunters in the fall. To get to the trail from Telluride follow the directions for the Lizard Head trail. GRAVEL ROAD PAVEMENT ' TH ' LAKES TH Galloping Goose Trail Land Owner Hope Lake Trail NON USFS WITHIN USFS BDY USDA FOREST SERVICE BLM 5 Miles National Forest Boundary 7/28/09 cg While enjoying the national forest, be responsible, care for the environment and respect other users. Practice LEAVE NO TRACE PRINCIPLES to minimize your impact on the environment. BE CONSIDERATE OF OTHER VISITORS • Yield to other users on trail • Step to the downhill side of trail when encountering pack stock PLAN AHEAD AND PREPARE • Know regulations for area • Prepare for weather DISPOSE OF WASTE PROPERLY • Pack it in, pack it out • Disposit solid human waste in catholes (6”-8” deep, at least 200 feet from water, camp and trails) • Pack out toilet paper LEAVE WHAT YOU FIND • Leave rock, plants and other natural objects • Do not build structures, furniture or trenches MINIMIZE CAMPFIRE IMPACTS • Use existing fire rings where fires are permitted • Keep fires small RESPECT WILDLIFE • Observe wildlife from a distance • Control pets at all times TRAVEL AND CAMP ON DURABLE SURFACES • Camp out of sight and sound of others • Camp 100 feet from streams and lakes May 2011 USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

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