Browns Canyon

National Monument - Colorado

Browns Canyon National Monument is in Chaffee County, Colorado. The site will be centered along the Arkansas River between Buena Vista and Salida. Browns Canyon is the most popular destination for whitewater rafting in the country, and is also known for its fishing and hiking. The monument will provide habitat protection for bighorn sheep, peregrine falcons, elk, and golden eagles.

maps

CPW Pocket Trail Map #8: Trails Map of Hecla Junction & Siedel's Suckhole areas in the Arkansas Headwaters Recreation Area (RA) in Colorado. Published by Colorado Parks & Wildlife.Arkansas Headwaters - Hecla Junction (#8)

CPW Pocket Trail Map #8: Trails Map of Hecla Junction & Siedel's Suckhole areas in the Arkansas Headwaters Recreation Area (RA) in Colorado. Published by Colorado Parks & Wildlife.

CPW Pocket Trail Map #7: Trails and Overview Map of Stone Bridge / North of Salida area in the Arkansas Headwaters Recreation Area (RA) in Colorado. Published by Colorado Parks & Wildlife.Arkansas Headwaters - Stone Bridge (#7)

CPW Pocket Trail Map #7: Trails and Overview Map of Stone Bridge / North of Salida area in the Arkansas Headwaters Recreation Area (RA) in Colorado. Published by Colorado Parks & Wildlife.

brochures

Colorado Recreation - Backyard to Backcountry. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).BLM Colorado - Colorado Recreation

Colorado Recreation - Backyard to Backcountry. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Camping on Public Lands in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).BLM Colorado - Camping on Public Lands

Camping on Public Lands in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Browns Canyon NM https://www.blm.gov/programs/national-conservation-lands/colorado/browns-canyon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Browns_Canyon_National_Monument Browns Canyon National Monument is in Chaffee County, Colorado. The site will be centered along the Arkansas River between Buena Vista and Salida. Browns Canyon is the most popular destination for whitewater rafting in the country, and is also known for its fishing and hiking. The monument will provide habitat protection for bighorn sheep, peregrine falcons, elk, and golden eagles.
Turret Trail 6045 en route to the Arkansas River at Little Cottonwood Creek is a steep but short 2-mile roundtrip hike with wide views of the area’s northern half. Access All access to Browns Canyon National Monument is via unpaved roads that have blind corners and other hazards. The 5.5-mile “in and out” hike along the gentle dead-end River Bench Trail 6045A provides a good sample of the northern Monument with an Arkansas River overlook. One of the main trailheads into the Monument is located adjacent to the Ruby Mountain Recreation Site (AHRA), which features a campground with restrooms, changing facilities, a boat ramp and picnic sites. The Hecla Junction Recreation Site (AHRA) is the primary location for taking boats out after floating through Browns Canyon. The area features a campground with restrooms, changing facilities, a boat ramp and picnic sites. The road into Hecla Junction is steep and unpaved. For more information about trails and hiking in the area, visit http://brownscanyon.org/wp-content/ uploads/2015/02/2-Browns-Canyon-NorthernTrails-42_-FINAL-OL-lowrez-8.24.14.pdf Roundtrip out-and-back along the west bank of the river via Seidel’s Suckhole Trail: 2 miles, 1.5 hours Stay on designated trails unless confident in cross-country hiking and navigation skills. •• Hecla Junction Trailhead (Hecla Junction Recreation Site) distances and estimated hiking times: Forest Service Road 1434A is an ATV route that traverses the northern boundary of the Monument. There is a seasonal gate closure Dec 1 – April 15 every year. •• Aspen Ridge Road (Forest Service Road 185) comprises the eastern boundary of the Monument. High clearance 4x4 vehicles recommended. Vehicles must remain within one vehicle length of the road when parking. BLM Photo by Bob Wick Browns Canyon National Monument For centuries, the rugged granite cliffs, colorful Browns Canyon For more Information rock outcroppings and stunning mountain vistas of Browns Canyon National Monument have Arkansas Headwaters Recreation Area 307 W. Sackett Avenue Salida, CO 81201 719-539-7289 http://bit.ly/1KqEsnW attracted visitors from around the world. The area’s unusual geology and roughly 3,000-foot range in elevation support a diversity of life and a wealth of geological, ecological, riparian, cultural National Monument BLM Royal Gorge Field Office 3028 East Main Street Cañon City, CO 81212 719-269-8500 http://on.doi.gov/1JKWyQU and historic resources. President Obama designated the 21,589-acre Browns Canyon National Monument on February ​ SFS Salida Ranger District U 5575 Cleora Road Salida, CO 81201 719-539-3591 http://1.usa.gov/1GziZti 19, 2015. The Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service jointly manage the Monument. Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW), through the manages river-based recreation on the Arkansas River through Cover: BLM Photo by Kyle Sullivan BLM Photo by Bob Wick Browns Canyon. BLM Photo by Bob Wick The Arkansas River within the AHRA is a world class fishery and provides an excellent opportunity for anglers to test their skills at catching brown and rainbow trout. As a testament to the excellent fishery, CPW designated the Arkansas River from the confluence with the Lake Fork of the Arkansas River downstream to Parkdale, Colorado (102 miles), as a Gold Medal Trout Fishery in 2014. This addition to the Gold Medal registry is Browns Canyon has a rich cultural history that we are still investigating. The Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 prohibits removing, disturbing or defacing archaeological sites or artifacts on federal public lands. Recreation About National Monuments Arkansas Headwaters Recreation Area (AHRA), BLM/CO/GI-15/009 Fishing Turret Road (Forest Service Road 184) off Aspen Ridge Road provides a rugged 4x4 experience into the heart of the Monument while traveling through open meadows and granite spires with the Collegiate Peaks Wilderness serving as the backdrop. The story of people living in the upper Arkansas River valley is told through sites and artifacts dating back 11,000 years. Within the monument, evidence of seasonal camps remains, including open campsites, prehistoric stone structures and rock shelter sites, among other features. These sites range from the PaleoIndian (11,000 years before present) to the Late Prehistoric Period (from around 2,000 years ago to the 1700s). The cultural resources within Browns Canyon provide future generations with the opportunity to learn from those who preceded us in exploring this beautiful area. Discovery of gold near the Arkansas River in 1859 brought an influx of people to the area, along with the need for transportation. While the old Stagecoach Road provided a route to Leadville for many years, it was very rugged and the trip was a long one. The arrival of the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad in 1880 allowed for much easier access to the booming mining area around Leadville. Many interesting historic prospecting sites
U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Colorado Recreation Backyard to Backcountry Map Guide & Guide BLM Colorado Recreation Backyard to Backcountry M ore than a quarter of public lands in Colorado are managed specifically for recreation and tourism. Recreation on BLM lands is all about the visitor’s freedom to choose where to go and what to do. Unlike many other recreation destinations, the BLM’s public lands are still quite rustic. There are no entrance stations and comparatively few developed recreation areas. Diversity is the name of the game in Colorado, from our lands, to our recreation opportunities, to our adjoining communities. Dozens of nearby communities provide permitted guiding and outfitting services, gear and equipment sales, and lodging. BLM Colorado is always seeking recreation partnerships to enhance visitors’ experiences and provide quality recreation opportunities. Public lands are not set aside solely for recreation; they offer energy potential and—in an increasingly urban world—vast open spaces. In many places, the flavor of the Old West is still plainly visible—in historic mining structures as well as contemporary ranching activities. syMBOLs Legend A J K V C A N T E G S Camping Hiking Horse Trail Historic Site Rock Climbing Mt. Biking 4WD Wildlife Viewing Fishing Back Country Byway Kayaking Cover Photo: Kevin Krill - Crested Butte Photography, Penitente Canyon Top: Photo ©Jerry Sintz, Animas Forks Bottom: BLM Photo by Matt McGrath, McInnis Canyons NCA 1 | O T D Q E P Q I H B W Dirt Bike Trail Rafting Hunting ATV Trail Scenic Geology Fossil Site Scenic Area Winter Rec Area Snowshoeing Canoeing Off-Highway Vehicle Know Before you go BLM Colorado Offices 9 1 Craig 8 3 Kremmling Meeker 10 2 DENVER Silt 6 4 5 7 6 Grand Junction 7 8 Gunnison Montrose 3 5 Cañon City 1 2 4 9 10 Monte Vista Durango ROyAL gORge FIeLd OFFICe sAn LUIs VALLey FIeLd OFFICe gUnnIsOn FIeLd OFFICe TRes RIOs FIeLd OFFICe UnCOMPAHgRe FIeLd OFFICe gRAnd JUnCTIOn FIeLd OFFICe COLORAdO RIVeR VALLey FIeLd OFFICe KReMMLIng FIeLd OFFICe LITTLe snAKe FIeLd OFFICe WHITe RIVeR FIeLd OFFICe For additional information, contact the local BLM field office for the area you are planning to visit, or go to www.blm.gov/programs/recreation/ recreation-activities/colorado. B LM Colorado wants you to have the best experience possible on your public lands. When planning your trip, take all necessary safety precautions and be aware of regulations. Take into consideration the weather conditions, necessary equipment and wildlife inhabiting the area. CAMPIng BLM-managed public lands provide a variety of options for overnight trips: • developed campgrounds may include a variety of facilities, such as restrooms, potable water, fire rings, picnic areas, garbage cans, tent pads, etc. • dispersed (undeveloped) campsites are normally recognized by a hardened surface with no vegetation, where others have already camped. Use pre-existing fire rings or firepans, and be sure you know the local fire restrictions. TARgeT sHOOTIng Target shooting is permitted in most locations on BLM lands in Colorado. However, some areas are closed to target shooting for safety and resource protection. To ensure the well-being and enjoyment of all visitors on public lands, please follow laws, regulations and guidelines. OFF-HIgHWAy VeHICLes To ensure that all visitors have a chance to enjoy their public lands, visitors must abide by vehicle travel designations. In most BLM areas, OHVs are limited to operating on roads and trails that are identified on travel maps and/or posted as available for motorized use. Please check in with your local field office for more information on the best locations for motorized recreation. CULTURAL sITes Archaeologists study cultural sites to help understand the past. These important sites act as an outdoor classroom for all ages and provide insight into the lives of previous cultures. Collecting artifacts–including arrowheads–from federal public lands or Indian Tribal lands is illegal under federal laws and regulations. Violators may face prosecution and prison sentences of up to one year or more and possible fines. Never touch painted or plastered walls, petroglyphs or pictographs. The oil and dirt from hands can eventually destroy these remnants of past lives. Leave all artifacts exactly where you find them for others to enjoy. | 2 BLM Colorado offers a diversity of recreation activities and destinations. Here are a just few of the highlights: FIsHIng With four gold medal trout waters and three blue ribbon waters, some of Colorado’s best fishing is found on BLM public lands. Arkansas Headwaters Recreation Area, Gunnison Gorge National Conservation Area and the Upper Colorado River are just a few areas that offer excellent fishing opportunities. ByWAys Several scenic and historic byways such as the Alpine Loop Backcountry Byway, Dinosaur Diamond Scenic and Histor
U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Leave What You Find • Prehistoric and historic sites help us understand our past (collection of artifacts is against the law). Camping TM Plan Ahead and Prepare • Know the special concerns that go along with traveling in the back country. Minimize risk by planning a trip that matches your skills and expectations, and prepare for hazards and emergencies. • Please leave rocks, plants, fossils and other natural objects as you find them. N W E S TM • Visit in small groups when possible. • Protect riparian areas by camping at least 200 feet from lakes and streams. TM • Burn all wood and coals to ash, put out campfires completely, then scatter cool ashes. TM • Use a lightweight stove for cooking, and enjoy a candle lantern for light. Respect Wildlife • Never feed wild animals. • Good campsites are found, not made. Dispose of Waste Properly • Pack it in, pack it out. Inspect your campsite and rest areas for trash or spilled foods. Pack out all trash, leftover food, and litter (including toilet paper and hygiene products). Minimize Campfire Impacts • Where fires are permitted, use established fire rings, fire pans, or mound fires. • Keep fires small. Only use sticks from the ground that can be broken by hand. Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces • Durable surfaces include established trails and campsites, rock, gravel, dry grasses, or snow. on Public Lands • Enjoy rock art by viewing it, not touching it. • Control pets at all times. • Observe wildlife from a distance. Do not follow or approach them. TM • Deposit solid human waste in catholes dug 6-8 inches deep, at least 200 feet from water, camp and trails. Cover and disguise the cathole when finished. TM • Avoid wildlife during sensitive times: mating, nesting, raising young, or winter. Be Considerate of Other Visitors • Respect other visitors and protect the quality of their experience. TM BLM/CO/GI-18/0015 BLM Colorado State Office 2850 Youngfield Street Lakewood, CO 80215 (303) 239-3600 www.blm.gov/co BLM Photo For more information, please contact: CAMPING ON BLM PUBLIC LANDS IN COLORADO DEVELOPED AND UNDEVELOPED CAMPSITES There are more than 8 million acres of public land in Colorado, most of which is available for camping. This brochure is published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to help you enjoy camping on public lands, while preserving the quality of those lands for future generations. Building your camping adventure around your vehicle is one popular way to enjoy your public lands. Developed campgrounds have a variety of facilities available: a toilet, picnic tables, a fire ring, potable water, tent pads, and garbage cans. These sites may require a daily fee, which helps fund the care and maintenance of the site. You can also find developed campgrounds in nearby communities or on lands managed by other agencies. Developed site camping carries responsibilities for being a good neighbor to your fellow campers, and leaving a clean campsite for the next visitors. Although the BLM builds and manages campgrounds on the public lands in some areas, not all recreation attractions have developed recreation sites nearby. Undeveloped sites are normally recognized by a hardened © Jerry Sintz There are several options for staying overnight on public lands managed by the BLM in Colorado. You can camp within a vehicle, trailer, tent, or under the stars. You can enjoy a developed campground or any number of dispersed (undeveloped) sites, backpack or camp on a remote trail. Depending on where you go, available facilities and services vary widely. Please think about the following considerations as you decide what best fits your particular recreation outing. surface with no vegetation where others have already camped. Please use pre-existing campfire rings, and make sure you know fire restrictions that may be in place in your area. Camping at an undeveloped site brings the additional responsibility of packing out what you pack in, and properly disposing of human waste. Please observe the Leave No Trace Skills and Ethics guidelines outlined on the back of this brochure. BLM Photo by Bob Wick BLM Photo CAMPING Whether you take a short hike, an extended backpack trip, or mountain bike into the backcountry, more remote camping requires a greater level of preparation, additional gear and equipment, and more knowledge about how to care for yourself and the environment. Backcountry camping also carries an obligation to leave areas looking as you found them or even better for the next visitor to enjoy.

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