Dolores River

undefined - Colorado

The Dolores River is a tributary of the Colorado River, approximately 241 miles (388 km) long, in the U.S. states of Colorado and Utah. The river drains a rugged and arid region of the Colorado Plateau west of the San Juan Mountains. Its name derives from the Spanish El Rio de Nuestra Señora de Dolores, River of Our Lady of Sorrows. The river was explored and possibly named by Juan Maria Antonio Rivera during an 1765 expedition from Santa Fe. The mean annual flow of the Dolores prior to damming was approximately 1,200 cu ft/s (34 m3/s), but due to diversions it has been reduced to about 600 cu ft/s (17 m3/s).

location

maps

Visitor Map of Canyons of the Ancients National Monument (NM) in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Canyons of the Ancients - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Canyons of the Ancients National Monument (NM) in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Dolores Ranger District in San Juan National Forest (NF) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).San Juan MVUM - Dolores 2020

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Dolores Ranger District in San Juan National Forest (NF) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

brochures

Colorado Recreation - Backyard to Backcountry. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).BLM Colorado - Colorado Recreation

Colorado Recreation - Backyard to Backcountry. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Camping on Public Lands in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).BLM Colorado - Camping on Public Lands

Camping on Public Lands in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Dolores River https://www.blm.gov/visit/dolores-river https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolores_River The Dolores River is a tributary of the Colorado River, approximately 241 miles (388 km) long, in the U.S. states of Colorado and Utah. The river drains a rugged and arid region of the Colorado Plateau west of the San Juan Mountains. Its name derives from the Spanish El Rio de Nuestra Señora de Dolores, River of Our Lady of Sorrows. The river was explored and possibly named by Juan Maria Antonio Rivera during an 1765 expedition from Santa Fe. The mean annual flow of the Dolores prior to damming was approximately 1,200 cu ft/s (34 m3/s), but due to diversions it has been reduced to about 600 cu ft/s (17 m3/s).

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