Grand Mesa

National Forest - Colorado

The Grand Mesa National Forest is a U.S. National Forest in Mesa, Delta and Garfield Counties in Western Colorado. It borders the White River National Forest to the north and the Gunnison National Forest to the east. The forest covers most of Grand Mesa and the south part of Battlement Mesa. There are local ranger district offices located in Grand Junction. Animals that inhabit this forest are elk, mule deer, Canadian lynx, black bears, pine marten, cougars, and bighorn sheep. Birdwatchers get a seasonal opportunity to view species of bird such bald eagles, boreal owls, golden eagles, Mexican spotted owls, common ravens, wild turkeys and peregrine falcons.

maps

Visitor Map of Gunnison River Bluffs Extensive Recreation Management Area (ERMA) in the BLM Grand Junction Field Office area in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Gunnison River Bluffs - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Gunnison River Bluffs Extensive Recreation Management Area (ERMA) in the BLM Grand Junction Field Office area in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Outlaw Mesa in the Gateway Extensive Recreation Management Area (ERMA) in the BLM Grand Junction Field Office area in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Gateway - Outlaw Mesa

Map of Outlaw Mesa in the Gateway Extensive Recreation Management Area (ERMA) in the BLM Grand Junction Field Office area in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of Calamity Mesa in the Gateway Extensive Recreation Management Area (ERMA) in the BLM Grand Junction Field Office area in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Gateway - Calamity Mesa

Map of Calamity Mesa in the Gateway Extensive Recreation Management Area (ERMA) in the BLM Grand Junction Field Office area in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the Dolores River Special Recreation Management Area (SRMA) in the BLM Grand Junction Field Office area in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Dolores River - Visitor Map

Map of the Dolores River Special Recreation Management Area (SRMA) in the BLM Grand Junction Field Office area in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Trails Map of Palisade Rim and Palisade Plunge in the BLM Grand Junction Field Office area in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Palisade Rim and Palisade Plunge - Trails Map

Trails Map of Palisade Rim and Palisade Plunge in the BLM Grand Junction Field Office area in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Visitor Map of Horse Mountain Extensive Recreation Management Area (ERMA) in the BLM Grand Junction Field Office area in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Horse Mountain - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Horse Mountain Extensive Recreation Management Area (ERMA) in the BLM Grand Junction Field Office area in Colorado. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the Summer Designated Bike Route System in White River National Forest (NF) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,White River - Summer Bike Routes

Map of the Summer Designated Bike Route System in White River National Forest (NF) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,

Grand Mesa NF https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/gmug/home https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Mesa_National_Forest The Grand Mesa National Forest is a U.S. National Forest in Mesa, Delta and Garfield Counties in Western Colorado. It borders the White River National Forest to the north and the Gunnison National Forest to the east. The forest covers most of Grand Mesa and the south part of Battlement Mesa. There are local ranger district offices located in Grand Junction. Animals that inhabit this forest are elk, mule deer, Canadian lynx, black bears, pine marten, cougars, and bighorn sheep. Birdwatchers get a seasonal opportunity to view species of bird such bald eagles, boreal owls, golden eagles, Mexican spotted owls, common ravens, wild turkeys and peregrine falcons.
27 9 5 L ! < To M 260 A 758 G ! ¬ « 65 7 75 100 709 71 4 701 Z " G 109.1C 2 75 " G 70 7 yR rv e s e o 712 25 8.1 B ! Trailhead C ^ Visitor Center ! L ATV ! J Motorcycle ! G Mountain Bike ! " G 112 Indian Point 2C 11 2 112. 2A G ! 110 2B 113 Z 11 2. G ! 11 2. 715.1A L ! 719 11 0 110 G ! Private Lands Within Forest Boundary J ! 726 5 71 715 L ! 65 LEGEND J ! # L ! ¬ « You Are Here = Z 71 5 4 73 L ! b 72 5 Z 708 715 L ! ! L Grand Mesa National Forest 707.1 " G G ! 9 12 i rs 714 Flowing Park Reservoir " G Z 12 3 A .1 C ! 707 L ! 2 12 G ! 109.2A " G L ! L ! 781 Z Z .1A 125.1A 721 781 D G ! " G 707 Baron F 751 Lake ! 722 G ! 9.1 10 Z 706 Ward Lake Eggleston Lake 132 L ! 109 70 3 " G 115.1 B 5 11 an r G 4 1 7 ^ ! Trickel Park Reservoir A 7 2 7 B 6 70 121 F ! .1 734 L ! 109.2H 10 9.1 F ! F ! 9 71 Z 728 Hotel Twin Lake 1 12 9 71 " G 702 126 Butts Lake 123 " G G ! Carson Lake Forty Acre Lake F ! Crag Crest National Recreation Trail 2 75 101 Z Z " G 70 2 6 11 711 2 12 G ! Z Island Lake G ! 714.1A 100 702 C ! Scales Lake Trailhead 702 G ! G ! G ! " G 1A 71 4 G ! 757 757 . 11 5 108 104 G ! 759 C Mesa Top ! Big Creek Reservoir 73 4 25 0 25 4 50 6 F ! 758.1A 10 5 .1E 9 Cottonwood 0 5 Lake No 4 711.1A 2 50 Silver Lake 711 757 ! C G ! 503 F ! ! F Mesa Lake 121 12 9 533.1A G ! 7 25 Bull Creek Reservoirs G ! ! G ! 105 Z G ! 533 105 100 Cottonwood Lake No 1 Atkinson Reservoir 12 1 G ! G ! 758 103 506 257 Neversweat Reservoir 114 5 12 Water Dog Reservoir 501 ! 102 G ! Griffith Lake A 1 . 4 25 507 25 7 Bonham Reservoir 256 Long Slough Reservoir Cottonwood 25 9 Lake No 5 Lambe 512 8 25 505 G ! 105 L ! G ! Powderhorn Ski Area 507 65 259.1B 506.1A ¬ « Bull Creek Reservoir No 5 1A . 1 5 2 .1C 254 700 254.1 B 25 1 3 53 .1C 8 5 2 511 Attention 501 Big Meadows Reservoir L ! 258 25 4.1 L ! This product is reproduced from geospatial information prepared by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. GIS data and product accuracy may vary. They may be: developed from sources of differering accuracy, accurate only at certain scales, based on modeling or interpretation, incomplete while being created or revised, ect. Using GIS products for purposes other than those for which they were created, may yield inaccurate or misleading results. This information was released on August 2011. The Forest Service reserves the right to correct, update, modify, or replace, GIS products based on new inventories, new or revised information, and if necessary in conjunction with other federal, state or local public agencies or the public in general as required by policy or regulation. Previous recipients of the products may bot be notified unless required by policy or regulation. Fore more information, contact the Grand Valley Ranger District at (970) 242-8211. 9 25 esa 259 .1D Grand Mesa National Forest Mesa Top Area 259 . 0 0.25 0.5 1 1.5 Miles 2 Travel Hierarchy Travel designations are shown as and signed on the ground based on a travel hiearchy. Routes designated open to a specific use are also open to all use shown (with symbols) below that use. However, that route is not designated as opne to any of the use symbols shown above. Mountain Bike-Seasonal Designation (Recommend No Mountain Bike Travel After Labor Day) G F Hiker ! È Horse ! Improved Road Unimproved Road Trail, Designated use identified by symbols in accordance with the Travel Hiearchy diagram Trail; To Be Constructed For Example: A route shown as a designated ATV route is also open to Motorcycles, Mountain Bikes, Horses, and Hikers, but is not opne to any full-size vehicles (greater than 50" in width). Routes shown on this map have also been signed on the ground. Each trail sign includes the trail name, route number and allowable uses. Unless shown on this map and signed as open on the ground, all other routes should be considered closed.
SHORT HIKES The h lakes l k ffeaturedd on the h enclosed l d Wardd Lakes hiking trails map have a turbulent history. Several short hikes will take you by the sites of the following story. Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre and Gunnison National Forests L21 ON GRAND MESA PHOTO: GRAND MESA BYWAY ASSOCIATION Old time residents felt very strongly about their right to fish, or maybe it was their disregard for other people’s rights to own a lake. Whatever the case, the Grand Mesa Feud was a long-term battle between fish poachers and private property owners. While most settlers homesteaded in the valley in order to raise and harvest crops, a few men homesteaded on top of Grand Mesa in order to harvest fish. Locals were not understanding of this idea, so they continued to fish. WILLIAM RADCLIFFE AS HE APPEARED IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS IN JULY, 1901 PHOTO: DENVER PUBLIC LIBRARY, WESTERN HISTORY DEPARTMENT The feud heated up in 1896 when William Radcliffe, an English aristocrat, arrived on the Grand Mesa. Mr. Radcliffe was not well received by many of the local residents. He acquired the title and fishing rights to the Alexander group of lakes and set to work improving the existing fish hatchery and hotel on the shore of Alexander Lake. No amount of fishing permits would pacify those who trespassed on his property and caught his fish. The funny thing is, many of the fish poachers would have “shot the pants off” anyone trying to steal a calf from their own herd. The h Grand d Mesa retains its nice flat f tabletop thanks to a cap of basalt it acquired over nine million years ago. As the basalt lava flowed from fissures (cracks in the earth), it filled a wide flat valley. Eventually, the soft rock around the basalt valley eroded away leaving a mesa high in the air. Later (14,000 years ago), ice caps rearranged rocky debris into troughs that caught melting snow to form more than 300 lakes and reservoirs on top of the Grand Mesa. VISITOR CENTER VIEW FROM LOWER PARKING LOT PHOTO: GRAND MESA BYWAY ASSOCIATION The National Forest Visitor Center is the perfect place to learn more about the Grand Mesa. Staff is available to answer questions on recreation opportunities, natural resources and the area. Exhibits reveal more stories about the Grand Mesa and a wide selection of books are available to purchase. The visitor center is open between 9 AM and 5 PM daily, including weekends, during the summer. (970) 856-4153. FISH HATCHERY ON ALEXANDER LAKE PHOTO: DELTA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY As a last resort, Radcliffe posted state game wardens at the lakes. Tragedy struck when W.A. Womack, a local rancher intent on fishing, taunted a bit too much and was shot by warden Frank Mahaney. Womack died on the shore of Island Lake. An outraged mob of over 100 men gathered and proceeded to burn the hotel and everything Radcliffe owned while he was away. Radcliffe never returned to western Colorado. RADCLIFFE HOTEL ON ALEXANDER LAKE, circa 1896-1901. PHOTO: DELTA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY Besides scenic hiking areas, are the Mesa Lakes and Ward Lakes areas shown on the enclosed maps are popular areas for fishing. The lakes accessible by main roads are stocked with mature Rainbow Trout a couple times in early summer. South Mesa Lake has a naturally reproducing Brook Trout population and Lost Lake is occasionally stocked with fingerling Cutthroat Trout. A fishing license is required, as well as knowing the fishing regulations. FOREST ENTRANCE ON NORTH SIDE PHOTO: GRAND MESA BYWAY ASSOCIATION I’M A MARMOT - THE LARGEST OF THE SQUIRREL FAMILY PHOTO: GRAND MESA BYWAY ASSOCIATION The US: Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age, disability, political beliefs, sexual orientation and marital or family status. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alterative means for communications of program information (braille, large print, audio tapes, etc.) should contact the USDA Target Center at 202-720-2600 (voice or TDD.) To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA Office of Civil Rights, Room 326- W Whitten Building, 14th & Independence Ave. SW, Washington DC 20250-9410, or ca11202-720-5964 (voice or TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. For More Information: Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre and Gunnison National Forests Grand Valley Ranger District Supervisors Office 2777 Cross Road Blvd, Unit A 2250 Highway 50 Grand Junction, Colorado, 81506 Delta, Colorado, 81416 (970) 242-8211 (970) 874-6600 WESTER N COLOR ADO Grand Mesa Scenic & Historic Byway A Colorado National Byway Mesa Lake Area Trails: Length Difficulty to Visitor Center ! Mesa Lake Shoreline #503 1.5 E Lost Lake #502 1.5 M Rim View Trail #533 2.9 M Glacier Springs Cut-off #537 0.5 M Mesa Creek Trail #505 1.2 M West Bench Trail #501 5.9 M PHOTO: DELTA COUNTY TOURISM Trails are genera
Grand Mesa National Forest 65 HWY yway To Sk Sunset Lake Skyway u Mesa Lake .1k .3k .5k Island Lake Skinned Horse 2.4k .1k .2k McCullough Res. Finney .5k Sheep Lake
Wilderness Guidelines 1. Maximum party size is 25 heart beats, this is a maximum of 15 people and includes pets and stock. Larger groups tend to do significant damage to trails and campsites. 2. Locate campsites, campfires and recreational stock at least 100 feet from lakes, streams and trails. Vegetation and soil adjacent to lakes and streams are sensitive to disturbance. Camping away from trails adds to a visitor’s sense of solitude. 3. All dogs, except for working stock dogs, guide dogs or dogs used for legal hunting, must be restrained on a leash and or under direct verbal control of the dogs’ owner or handler at all times. All pets must be on a leash in the Oh-Be-Joyful drainage. Pets are not a natural part of the wilderness and their presence can disrupt wildlife. 4. No motorized vehicles, motorized equipment, motorized boats or other forms of mechanical transport, such as mountain bikes, within the Wilderness is allowed. 5. Landing of aircraft or dropping of materials, supplies or persons from aircraft is prohibited. 6. Stay on the trail when possible. Shortcutting switchbacks creates a path which channels water and accelerates erosion. 7. Pack out everything you bring in and any other trash you may find along the way. 8. Use pack stoves, especially in areas of heavy use. If a campfire is necessary, make a small fire without rocks around it. Make sure your fire is dead out and erase all signs of fire when you leave. 9. Bury human waste at least 100 feet from lakes and streams and 6 inches deep in the soil so it will decompose naturally. 10. Wash at least 50 feet from lakes and streams and use biodegradable soap. The Raggeds Wilderness encompasses almost 65,000 acres on the Gunnison and White River National Forests. Elevations within the Wilderness range from 7,000 to over 13,000 feet. Over 90 miles of constructed trails are available for both foot and horse travel through sometimes rugged terrain. Weather for the area can vary greatly; but generally you can expect cool mountain climate with scattered rain showers throughout the summer months. Normally, the Raggeds Wilderness Area is snow free from July to September, but conditions depend on the elevation and amount of snowfall each winter. Lower elevations from around 7,000 to 8,500 feet may become snow free by early June, but some creek and river water levels tend to be high. The annual precipitation varies from 25” to 40”. Some points of interest in the Raggeds are Dark Canyon, Ragged Mountains, Marcellina Mountain, Mount Justice, Treasury Mountain and Oh-BeJoyful Pass. Wildlife includes elk, mule deer, black bear, bobcat, mountain lion, coyote, snowshoe hares, Golden Eagle and other small species. Streams are inhabited by native cutthroat, rainbow, brook and brown trout. Ruby Anthracite Creek The Raggeds Wilderness Area For further Information write or call us at: Gunnison National Forest Paonia Ranger District P.O. Box 1030 403 N. Rio Grande Ave. Paonia, CO 81428 (970) 527-4131 White River National Forest Sopris Ranger District P.O. Box 309 620 Main Street Carbondale, CO 81623 (970) 963-2266 For any questions or comments please contact: Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre, White River National & Gunnison National Forest Forest Supervisor’s Supervisor’s Office Office 2250 Highway 50 P.O. Box 948 Delta, CO 81416 Glenwood Springs, CO 81602 (970) 874-6600 (970) 945-3229 1. TH Sopris Ranger District TH 2. Paonia Ranger District Personal Safety is a constant consideration in the Wilderness. Wilderness users face inherent risk of adverse weather conditions, isolation, physical hazards, and lack of rapid communication. Listed below are some important safety concerns: Giardia is a microscopic organism found in water which can cause diarrhea, nausea, weakness and a fever. Chorine and Iodine are effective, but boiling your water for 5-10 minutes will kill the organism. Hypothermia is a lowering of the body’s core temperature which can lead to death. Symptoms include shivering, tiredness, slurred speech, and disorientation. Prevention—Keep the victim warm and dry and give hot liquids if possible. Do not give the victim any alcoholic beverages, get professional medical assistance immediately. This map is not intended for use as a trail map. US Geological Survey 7 1/2 minute topographic maps show the level of detail needed for wilderness travel use. You can buy these maps at most sporting goods stores or directly from USGS at: US Geological Survey Denver Federal Center P.O. Box 25046 Denver, CO 80225-0046 TH 3. The following maps cover the Raggeds Wilderness: Chair Mountain, Marble, Paonia Reservoir, Marcellina Mountain, Oh-Be-Joyful, Snowmass Mountain 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Principles of Leave No Trace: Plan Ahead & Prepare Travel & Camp on Durable Surfaces Dispose of Waste Properly Leave What You Find Minimize Campfire Impacts Respect Wildlife Be Considerate of Other Visitors TH The Raggeds Wilderness Trailheads 1. Raspberry 2. Yule Creek 3. Anthraci
The West Elk Wilderness encompasses more than 176,000 acres in the Gunnison National Forest. Elevations within the Wilderness range from 7,000 to over 13,000 feet. Over 200 miles of constructed trails are available for both boot and horse travel through sometimes rugged terrain. Weather for the area can vary greatly; but generally, you can expect cool mountain climate with scattered rain showers throughout the summer months. Normally, the West Elk Area is snow free from mid-July to September, but conditions depend on the elevation and amount of snowfall each winter. Lower elevations from around 7,000 to 8,500 feet may become snow free by early June, but some creek and river water levels tend to be high. The annual precipitation varies from 25 inches to 40 inches. Some points of interest in the West Elks are the Castles, West Elk Peak, Sheep Lake, North/Middle/South Baldy Mountain, West and East Beckwith Mountains. Wildlife includes elk, mule deer, black bear, bobcat, mountain lion, coyote, snowshoe hares, Golden Eagle and other small species. Streams are inhabited by native cutthroat, rainbow, brook and brown trout. Forest maps and trail information is available at the Forest Service offices in Delta, Paonia and Gunnison. Please observe Wilderness guidelines when you visit and record trips at trailhead registers. Wilderness Guidelines 1. Maximum party size is 25 heart beat, this is a maximum of 15 people and includes livestock and pets. Larger groups tend to do significant damage to trails and campsites. 2. Locate campsites, campfires and recreational stock at least 100 feet from lakes, streams and trails. Vegetation and soils adjacent to lakes and streams are sensitive to disturbance. Camping away from trails adds to a visitor’s sense of solitude. 3. All dogs, except for working stock dogs, guide dogs or dogs used for legal hunting, must be restrained on a leash and/or under direct verbal control of the dogs’ owner or handler at all times. Pets are not a natural part of the wilderness and their presence can disrupt wildlife. 4. No motorized vehicles, motorized equipment, motorboats or other forms of mechanical transport such as mountain bikes within the Wilderness is allowed. 5. Landing of aircraft or dropping of materials, supplies or persons from aircraft is prohibited. 6. Camping and campfires within 1/4 mile of Sheep Lake is not allowed. 7. Stay on the trail when possible. Short cutting switchbacks creates a path which channels water and accelerates erosion. 8. Pack out everything you bring in and any other trash you may find along the way. 9. Use pack stoves, especially in areas of heavy use. If a campfire is necessary, make a small fire without rocks around it. Rocks and the soil are easily scarred by fire. Make sure your fire is dead out and erase all signs of fire when you leave. 10. Bury human waste at least 100 feet from lakes and streams and 6 inches in the soil so it will decompose naturally. 11. Wash at least 50 feet from lakes and streams. Use a biodegradable soap. Personal Safety is a constant consideration in the Wilderness. Wilderness users face inherent risk of adverse weather conditions, isolation, physical hazards, and lack of rapid communication. Listed below are some important safety concerns: Giardia is a microscopic organism found in water which can cause diarrhea, nausea, weakness, and a fever. Chlorine and Iodine are ineffective, but boiling your water for 5-10 minutes will kill the organism. Hypothermia is a lowering of the body’s core temperature which can lead to death. Symptoms include shivering, tiredness, slurred speech and disorientation. Prevention—Keep the victim warm and dry and give hot drinks if possible. Do not give the victim any alcoholic beverages. Get professional medical assistance immediately. Emergency Contacts: Delta County Sheriff’s Department: (970)874-2000, Gunnison County Sheriff’s Department: (970)641-8000, or 911. Sheep Lake West Elk Wilderness For any questions or comments please contact: Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre and Gunnison National Forests Supervisors Office 2250 Highway 50 Delta, CO 81416 (970) 874-6600 www.fs.fed.us/r2/gmug This map is not intended for use as a trail map. US Geological Survey 7 1/2 minute topographic maps show the level of detail needed for wilderness travel use. You can buy these maps at most sporting goods stores or directly from USGS at: US Geological Survey Denver Federal Center P.O. Box 25046 Denver, CO 80225 www.usgs.gov 1. TH Paonia Ranger District The following maps cover the West Elk Wilderness Area: Minnesota Pass, W. Beckwith Peak, Anthracite Range, Mt. Guero, Big Soap Park, West Elk Peak, Squirrel Creek, Little Soap Park, West Elk Peak SW, & McIntosh Mt. Minnesota Pass WBeckwith Peak Anthracite Range Mt Axtell Mt.Guero Big Soap Park West Elk Peak Squirrel Creek Little Soap Park West Elk Peak SW McIntosh Mt. For more information write or call: Gunnison National Forest Gunnison Ranger District Paonia R
Legend Status codes Abundance categories C Always present in moderate to large numbers in the appropriate habitat and season. F Always present, but in smaller numbers, in the appropriate habitat and season. U Resident and partially migratory species. Nests in region in summer. Many withdraw in fall, and others migrate to our region to winter. A population is present all seasons of the year. Annually occurs in small numbers in the appropriate habitat and season, but is missing from much apparently appropriate habitat. R WR Winter Resident, migratory species that winters but does not nest in our region. Occurs irregularly in small numbers in the habitat and season, and is frequently absent entirely throughout the season. Species on the periphery of their normal ranges. S MI Migratory species that neither nests nor winters in the region. It may be present during the breeding season but is a non-breeder. Occurrence is sporadic and normally unexpected. Species outside their normal ranges. PR Permanent Resident, non-migratory breeders. SR Summer Resident, migratory species. Nests in region in summer and most return to their winter grounds. RE SM Spring Migratory species that passes through the region in the spring. FM Fall Migratory species that passes through the region in the fall. VI A Visitor species is one that occurs irregularly. and unreliably. Seasons Defined for migratory species by birds’movements; defined for resident species by the calendar. Wi Winter—For migrants, that period when the species is on its wintering grounds; for resident species, December-February. Sp Spring—For migrants, that period when the species is moving from its wintering grounds to its nesting grounds; for residents species, March-May. Su Summer—For migrants, that period when the species is on its nesting grounds; for resident species, June-July. Fa Fall Migration—For migrants, that period when the species is moving from its nesting grounds to its wintering area; for resident species, AugustNovember. Spring and Fall migration windows These windows represent the dates for the bulk of migration through the region. Aberrant dates have been disregarded. When available, dates for resident migrant species are given. Dates for casual species reflect few observations, and they should not be considered limiting. 1-12 a-d W B January though December. First week of the month through the fourth. Present during the winter. Present during the breeding season BC ird t s i l k c he Birds of Western Colorado Forest Service Lands Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre, and Gunnison National Forests The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or a part of an individual's income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA's TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Brown-capped rosy-finch © Glenn Walbek. Used with permission. This list was researched and compiled by Coen Dexter W S S F ST i p u a Spring GNATCATCHERS Blue-gray Gnatcatcher THRUSHES Western Bluebird Mountain Bluebird Townsend's Solitaire Swainson's Thrush Hermit Thrush American Robin MIMIDS Gray Catbird Northern Mockingbird Sage Thrasher STARLINGS European Starling PIPITS American Pipit WAXWINGS Cedar Waxwing WARBLERS Orange-crowned Warbler Nashville Warbler Virginia's Warbler Yellow Warbler Chestnut-sided Warbler "Audubon's” Yellowrumped Warbler "Myrtle” Yellow-rumped Warbler Black-throated Gray Warbler Townsend's Warbler Grace's Warbler Ovenbird MacGillivray's Warbler Hooded Warbler Wilson's Warbler Yellow-breasted Chat WS S F ST i p u a Spring Fall TANAGERS SR U U U 4d-B RE R U F U SR C C C 3b-B RE U F F F SR R R R 5b-B SR U C U 5a-B RE R C C C FR FR SR U U U 5c-B R R R 5a-B R R R 3c-B B-10b Western Tanager B-10c SPARROWS Green-tailed Towhee Spotted Towhee American Tree Sparrow B-9d B-10c B-9b B-9a B-9c PR S U U U SR F U F RE U U U U SR MI SR SR MI F R F F S F F R F F C F S S 4d-B 5a-5c 4d-B 5a-B 5b-6d SR S C F C 4d-B B-10b 8c-10a B-9c B-9b 9a-9d B-11a MI U U 4d-5c 9d-10d SR MI SR SR U U U 4d-B B-9d S U 5a-5d 8c-10a F F F 5a-B B-9a S 6a-7a SR MI SR SR U F U 5b-B S F F C 5b-B S S S 5c-B Chipping Sparrow Brewer's Sparrow Vesper Sparrow Lark Sparrow Sage Sparrow Lark Bunting Sava
Gunnison area wildlife F ollowing is a list of species occurring in the Gunnison area, with descriptions, showing birds and mammals that people see on the Gunnison National Forest. Birds  Gray Jays (Camp Robbers) are common in the Gunnison Basin area. They usually fly low among the trees in coniferous woods. Often their flight is relatively slow, punctuated with bursts of soft flopping wingbeats and a sailing glide. The Gray Jay is a very social bird that spends a lot of time around campgrounds. This bird is light gray overall with dark eyes. A frequent visitor of camps, they quickly learn to associate people with food. This bird may have demonstrated to some of you how fearless or ‘tame’ they are and how they have earned the nickname camp robber. Gray Jays are typically noisy, gregarious, and easily observed birds.  Clark’s Nutcrackers may be seen in mature mixed coniferous forests, usually near open rocky areas. They often fly around mountain slopes or perch on conspicuous trees or rocks, and they also frequent high elevation areas near treeline. This bird feeds mainly on seeds of pines. They typically cache pine seeds on southern mountain slopes, which is an important factor affecting tree distribution since many seeds are not recovered and grow into new trees. Their head, back, and underparts are pale gray and their wings are black. They also have a long, pointed black beak. Clark’s Nutcrackers walk like a crow when they are on the ground, which is a good behavioral characteristic that can be used to distinguish this bird from jays (jays hop).  Gunnison Sage-grouse are an obligate of sagebrush plant communities. This species exists in 7 separate populations in southwest Colorado and southeast Utah, with the largest population (approx. 3,600 birds) inhabiting the Upper Gunnison Basin. The Gunnison Ranger District manages about 85,300 acres of occupied Gunnison Sage-grouse habitat, comprising almost 11% of the overall occupied habitat throughout the species’ range. This species is a candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act. For more information and viewing opportunities please visit: • http://www.siskadee.org • http://www.western.edu/faculty/jyoung/gunnison-sage-grouse • http://www.gunnisoncounty.org/sage_grouse.html • http://wildlife.state.co.us/WildlifeSpecies/Profiles/Birds/ Gunnisonsagegrouse.htm • http://www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/species/birds/ gunnisonsagegrouse/ • http://www.blm.gov/co/st/en/fo/gfo/sage_grouse.html Dusky Grouse (formerly called blue grouse) are large upland game birds that occupy coniferous and mixed coniferous-deciduous forests. They can be difficult to see because of their excellent camouflage coloration. The male (in courtship display)  is mainly blue-gray with brown wings and a long, black tail; in courtship display the reddish air sacks are evident. The female (in the aspen)  is brown, finely barred with black. 1 2 3 4 11 12 13 14 15 16 17  White-tailed Ptarmigan are high altitude ground dwelling birds. They are found above treeline in alpine tundra habitat. Ptarmigans have excellent coloration to avoid detection in both winter and summer. During the summer they are a mottled brown and they blend in with lichen covered rocks and alpine vegetation. In winter they are pure white except for their black eyes and bill. Their legs and feet are feathered, which protects them from the extreme cold of the alpine winters. The photo was taken in October, which is when ptarmigan are molting and developing their winter plumage. Many other birds, including rufous and broad-tailed hummingbirds, mountain chickadees, brown creepers,  Three-toed Woodpeckers,  Red-naped Sapsuckers, and many Neotropical migrants may also be seen on the Gunnison National Forest. River and stream corridors are excellent places for birding, as aquatic habitats and associated wetlands and riparian areas support the highest diversity and numbers of birds compared to dry upland habitats. The most common hawk seen in the Gunnison Basin area is probably the  Red-tailed Hawk which may be seen soaring high in the sky or perched on the tops of conifers. Swainson’s hawk and northern harrier are also commonly seen. Golden eagles may be seen year-round. The bald eagle and rough-legged hawk are winter residents in the Gunnison Basin and can be frequently spotted from Highway 135, County Road 730 (Ohio Creek Road), and Highway 50, often gliding or perched on trees or powerline poles. Roughlegged hawks are sometimes seen hovering in place above hay meadows or shrublands looking for prey. In the winter, Golden and Bald Eagles (a Bald Eagle is pictured on the cover) can be spotted in the Gunnison and East River corridors and in Taylor Canyon, often soaring above the cliffs or perched on trees high among the canyon walls or along the Taylor River.  Northern Goshawks (a juvenile is shown) typically nest in mature aspen and lodgepole pine forests on the Gunnison National For

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