Uncompahgre - Mountain

National Forest - Colorado

Uncompahgre National Forest is a U.S. National Forest covering (in descending order of land area) parts of Montrose, Mesa, San Miguel, Ouray, Gunnison, Hinsdale, San Juan, and Delta Counties in western Colorado. Only its headquarters is in Delta County, in the city of Delta. It borders the San Juan National Forest to the south. Within the national forest boundaries can be found the arid Uncompahgre Plateau and the northern portion of the San Juan Mountains. The forest contains three alpine wilderness areas, Uncompahgre (formerly the Big Blue Wilderness), Mount Sneffels and Lizard Head.
Uncompahgre NF - Mountain https://www.fs.usda.gov/main/gmug/home https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncompahgre_National_Forest Uncompahgre National Forest is a U.S. National Forest covering (in descending order of land area) parts of Montrose, Mesa, San Miguel, Ouray, Gunnison, Hinsdale, San Juan, and Delta Counties in western Colorado. Only its headquarters is in Delta County, in the city of Delta. It borders the San Juan National Forest to the south. Within the national forest boundaries can be found the arid Uncompahgre Plateau and the northern portion of the San Juan Mountains. The forest contains three alpine wilderness areas, Uncompahgre (formerly the Big Blue Wilderness), Mount Sneffels and Lizard Head.
JUD WIEBE: Built together by the town of Telluride and the Forest Service in 1987, this short but steep trail was designed and named after the late Jud Wiebe (a Forest Service Recreation Manager). He passed away in 1986 before the trail’s completion. This trail begins in Telluride at the top of Aspen Street and ends at the Tomboy Road. The trail climbs on either end then contours through an aspen forest. Most views from this trail are of Telluride and the ski area. This is a family friendly trail and a favorite among local people. Trail length: 2.7 miles. Open to: hikers, horses (to the Deep Creek Trail intersection from the trailhead) and mountain bikers. Lupine and Paintbrush SNEFFELS HIGH LINE: This trail is one of the most challenging and rewarding day hikes in the area. It climbs up into the high country of the Mount Sneffels Wilderness above timberline. It passes by old cabin ruins, mines and streams. When planning this hike, get any early start to avoid afternoon thunderstorms in the summer. The eastern access for this trail is from the Jud Wiebe trailhead at the top of Aspen Street. The western access for this trail is from the Mill Creek Road. From Telluride drive 1 mile west on Highway 145 to Forest Service Road 637 (Mill Creek Road) near the Shell gas station. Turn right on Mill Creek Road and follow it approximately 1.5 miles to the Telluride Town reservoir. This is a high clearance road not recommended for passenger cars. There is parking near the reservoir. Trail length: 8.5 miles. Open to: hikers and horses. DEEP CREEK: This is a good trail for early and late season hiking due to its southern exposure and lower elevation. There are some steep sections on either end of the trail. It is located almost entirely in aspen timber with a few scattered spruce and fir stands. The trail has panoramic views of the ski area and the San Juan Mountains. Waterfalls can be seen along the east end of the trail in the Mill Creek Basin. To get to the eastern trail access from Telluride drive west 1 mile on Highway 145 to Forest Service Road 637 (Mill Creek Road) near the Shell gas station. Turn right on Mill Creek Road and follow it approximately 1.5 miles to the Telluride Town reservoir. This is a high clearance road not recommended for passenger cars. There is parking near the reservoir. To get to the western access for this trail from Telluride drive west 2.5 miles on Highway 145 to Forest Road 638 (Last Dollar Road). Turn right on Last Dollar Road and follow the road for about 3 miles. Turn right to enter the trailhead parking lot. This trail receives heavy bike use. Hikers use caution. Bikers please yield to hikers and horses. . Trail length: 12 miles. Open to: hikers, horses and mountain bikers. Telluride drive west about 8 miles. Turn left on the Fall Creek Road (County Road 57P). Follow this road for about 9 miles. The trailhead is on the left before Woods Lake Campground. Trail length: 10.5 miles. Open to: hikers, horses and seasonal motorcycle use July 1 through Labor Day. EIDER CREEK: This short spur trail connects to the Deep Creek Trail. The trail climbs steeply for 2 miles, and then intersects the Deep Creek Trail. From Telluride drive 1 mile west on Highway 145. Turn right on Forest Road 637 (Mill Creek Road) near the Shell gas station. This dirt road is high clearance and not recommended for passenger cars. Drive about .5 mile to the first hairpin turn. This is the trailhead. Trail length: 1.6 miles. Open to: hikers, horses and mountain bikers. GALLOPING GOOSE: Most of this trail follows the old Rio Grande Southern Railroad from Lizard Head Pass to Society Turn near Telluride. This route once had over 140 bridges and trestles, of which only one remains today. Incredible views of mountain peaks, old historic structures and scenic lakes and streams await those who venture out on this trail. Portions of this trail share forest and county roads. Other sections have steep grades and get light use. The trail is marked by the Galloping Goose logo beginning at Lizard Head Pass. This popular mountain biking trail can be done in sections or in its entirety. It offers a challenge without being overly technical. To get to the trailhead at Lizard Head Pass from Telluride drive about 3 miles to Highway 145 (Society Turn). Turn left heading south for about 11 miles to Lizard Head Pass. There is a rest area and interpretive site on the right side of the highway. The trailhead is on the left side of the highway on Forest Service Road 626. Trail length: 16.5 miles. Open to: hikers, horses and mountain bikers. WILSON MESA: This is a good trail for early season access and late fall color. It is primarily in spruce and fir with some aspen and a few small open parks. There are several small stream crossings and wetlands to navigate. The trail borders the Lizard Head Wilderness area for almost the entire length. This trail receives a lot of motorcycle use during the summer since it is the only motorized trail in
Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre and Gunnison National Forest Access: From Ouray take U.S. 550 two miles south. Trail parking is on the east side of U.S. 550 immediately south of the tunnel. Restrictions: #241 – Hiker only; #241.1A and #242 are open to hiker and horse Length: #241 is 3.5miles Trail Beginning: #241.1A is 2.3miles Elevation 8,440 feet Latitude 38.0029, Longitude – 107.6616 NAD 83 Datum Use caution when crossing Hwy 550 to access the trailhead. #242 is 2.6miles Trail Ending: Elevation: #241 - 11,100’ #241.1A - 12,350’ #242- 12,800’ #241 Ends at the junction near Yellow Jacket Mine. #241.1 A and #242 end at American Flats Bear Creek trail is recognized as a National Recreation Trail because of its particularly unique and spectacular nature. The trail is steep and narrow with many switchbacks at the beginning. Travel time to the Yellow Jacket Mine is about a 4 to 5 hour hike. Distance to the mine is approximately 3.5 miles. For about 1/2 of the trail's length there are many ledges and cliffs. The first section of the trail crosses a large talus field with unstable rock. Just after the switchbacks, the trail narrows with a sheer drop off. Hikers with a fear of heights may opt to turn around here. Travel off the trail is not advised and hikers should be cautious of falling rock. Hiking with dogs is not recommended. Camping sites are very limited. The first suitable location is within a mile of the Yellow Jacket mine. The first 3.5 miles of the Bear Creek Trail from U.S. Highway 550 to the Yellow Jacket mine are included in the National Recreation Trail System. It is only a part of a system of trails in this area. At the Yellow Jacket mine, the trail forks. The south fork (#242) travels southeast to Engineer Mountain Pass. The north fork (#241.1A) ties into the Horsethief Trail on American Flats. The Bear Creek trail was constructed in the late 1800's for miner's access to claims along Bear Creek and as an alternate route over Engineer Mountain to avoid paying toll on the Million Dollar Highway. When originally constructed, it was a substantial, well-built route hewn out of rock ledges and supported by log and rock cribbing secured to the rocks with drill ore, rails and iron pine. Buildings, equipment shafts and adits still remain as evidence of the trails historic past. A wide variety of geological structures can be seen along the trail s. The lower portion of the trail switches back through quartzite and slate of the Uncompahgre formation. This formation is exposed only in this area south of Ouray and is the oldest Precambrian formation in Colorado that displays ripple marks and striations of graded bedding, displaying its sedimentary origins. The trail climbs into the San Juan formation composed of volcanic tuff. Here the rock is intersected by veins containing pyrite, with rich deposits of silver, lead and zinc sulfides. Higher along the trail, above timberline, the rock changes into the Silverton volcanic series. Its glaciated valley characterizes this section. A large rock glacier can be seen on the north-facing slope. Vegetation varies widely dependent upon the elevation. White fir, Douglas fir, gambel oak, and aspen typify the lower section. Engelmann spruce, sub-alpine fir and aspen grow along the central section of the trail. Still higher, the trees give way to grasses, sedges and forbs typical of alpine tundra. The principal big game animals in the area include elk, mule deer, and bighorn sheep. Mountain lions are occasionally seen. Other wildlife includes marmots, pikas, grouse, and ptarmigan. Trail alignment follows the original route and design. Average tread width is 24 inches. The tread surface varies for solid rock to slate talus. Deterioration has occurred in some of the original cribbing and pinning. New Supports have been added, replacing portions where hazardous. Consistent grades, high elevation, cliffs, and rock types make the trail above average in difficulty for hikers not oriented to the types of trails in the Ouray area. With current improvements, the trail can be used for day trips or longer trips to the Grizzly Bear and Yellow Jacket mines. Reconstruction and new development are planned for connecting trails to Engineer Mountain and along the Horsethief trail to form a loop system. Bear Creek, #241 and #241.1A 12,500 Elevation (feet) 12,000 11,500 11,000 Yellow Jacket Mine 10,500 10,000 9,500 9,000 8,500 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 5.5 Miles from trailhead Bear Creek, #241 and #242 12,500 Elevation (feet) 12,000 11,500 11,000 Yellow Jacket Mine 10,500 10,000 9,500 9,000 8,500 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 5.5 6 Miles from trailhead ATTENTION This product is reproduced from geospatial information prepared by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. GIS d ata and product accuracy may vary. They may be: developed from sources of differing accuracy, accurate only at certain scales, bas ed on modeling or interpretation, incom
TH Little Cimarron UNCOMPAHGRE WILDERNESS 858 861 868 Fa ll C ree k arron River Sheep Mountain 228 Big Blue Creek Fork C im Middle 219 231 River West Fork Cimarron River rron River Cimarron Owl Creek Pass 868 Cima 254 Little Elk TH 232 Little East Fork 219 Stealey Mountain 867 Fall TH Creek 149 A 12 WARNING: Do not use this map for wilderness navigation. It is intended for general reference only. Detailed maps are available at the locations shown on the back panel. 864 229 East Fork TH 863 Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre, & Gunnison National Forests Straley 03/14/11 TH Big Blue 253 233 Middle TH Fork 244 Elk Creek 860 218 Courthouse Mountain 218 Pinnacle Ridge Dunsinane Mountain 144 Slide Lake 229 218 Precipice Peak 857 211 550 243 Dixie Ridge 258 227 Porphory Basin Silver Jack Mine Ruins 212 216 232 216 138 235 Silver Mountain 226 234 TH Independence 231 233 228 137 244 220 227 232 236.3A 132 217 142 Matterhorn Peak w Co 871 k 205 Larson Lakes 239 236 TH Uncompahgre Peak 239 233 ahg omp Unc Bighorn Ridge 149 233 Crystal Peak 256 136 re R 215 228 Uncompahgre Peak 14,309 Ft 233 226 214 135 Wetterhorn Peak 14,015 Ft Wetterhorn Basin ee Cr 14 Fork Gun nis Coxcomb Peak Lake 216 235 on R 236 872 B iver Redcliff Peak Cutler TH 245 241 Crystal Lake 238 Broken Hill 235 Crystal Larson TH North 236 Bridge of Heaven 877 iver 226 140 USFS TH Matterhorn Ouray Lake City 1 Mile BLM Blackwall Mountain 870 215 TH Bear Creek C He n se eek n Cr 241 NOTICE: Sheep grazing is permitted in the Uncompahgre Wilderness, and livestock protection dogs may be encountered near bands of sheep. To minimize potential conflicts, please keep your distance. Do not approach, harass, or in any way threaten the sheep or dogs. Keep pets under physical restraint. 550 American Flats 242 Darley Varden Mountain Sunshine Mountain Darley Mountain A1 A2 A3 A4 Dallas Courthouse Mountain Sheep Mountain Alpine Plateau B1 B2 B3 B4 Ouray Wetterhorn Peak Uncompahgre Peak Lake City C1 C2 C3 C4 Ironton Handies Peak Recloud Peak Lake San Cristobal MAP LEGEND BLM Wildhorse Peak 20 Alpine Loop Scenic Byway Capitol City (Site) TOPO MAP INDEX USFS Primary Highway Summit Over 13,000 Feet Improved Road Stock May Be Restricted Primitive Road TH Trailhead National Forest Trail 235 National Forest Trail Forest Boundary 118 Wilderness Boundary Butterfly Collection Closure 20 1 2 3 National Forest Road 4 “We have a profound, fundamental need for areas of wilderness -- a need that is essential to our understanding of ourselves, our culture, our own natures, and our place in nature.” Howard Zahniser RECREATION OPPORTUNITY GUIDE F Ouray Ranger District 2505 S. Townsend Avenue Montrose, CO 81401 (970) 240-5300 Forest Supervisor’s Office 2250 Highway 50 Delta, CO 81416 (970) 874-6600 Gunnsion Ranger District 216 N. Colorado Street Gunnison, CO 81230 (970) 641-0471 BLM Gunnison Field Office 216 N. Colorado Street Gunnison, CO 81230 (970) 641-0471 Visit us on the web at: www.fs.fed.us/r2/gmug. Learn more about wilderness or find more information on this wilderness at: www.wilderness.net. AMERICA’S Ouray Chamber Visitor Center PO Box 145 1230 Main Street Ouray, CO 81427 (970) 325-4746 (800) 228-1876 ouray@ouraycolorado.com RESOURCE UNCOMPAHGRE WILDERNESS US Department of Agriculture Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre, & Gunnison National Forests WILDERNESS ENDURING LEAVE NO TRACE Outdoor Ethics RESTRICTIONS Uncompahgre Wilderness RESPECT RESTRICTIONS Please Keep It Wild Violations are punishable by a maximum fine of $5,000 and/or six months imprisionment (Title 16 USC 551). Other restrictions may apply. For more information, contact the Ouray Ranger District: 970-240-5300. NOTICE Mechanized transportation or motorized equipment. This includes, but is not limited to: motor vehicles, bicycles, carts, and chainsaws. Building any structure or improvement. This includes, but is not limited to: hitchrails, camp furniture, and shelters. Damaging any natural feature. This includes, but is not limited to: falling or damaging trees, trenching, and vandalism. Collecting or harming butterflies in any stage of their life cycle from June 1 to August 30. Shortcutting a switchback in a trail. Failing to properly dispose of all garbage (pack it out) and leaving human waste in an exposed or unsanitary manner. Groups exceeding 15 persons and/or 25 heartbeats, including pack and saddle stock. Larger groups must separate into smaller groups and remain at least one mile apart at all times. Restraining a saddle or pack animal within 100 feet of a water source or designated trail or in violation of posted instructions. Animals must not be permitted to damage trees, soil, or vegetation. Building a campfire within 100 feet of a water source or designated trail or above treeline. Camping within 100 feet of a water source

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