Browns Park

National Wildlife Refuge - Colorado

Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge is located in Moffat County, Colorado in the extreme northwestern corner of the state, in an isolated mountain valley of Browns Park on both sides of the Green River, approximately 25 miles (40 km) below Flaming Gorge Dam. The refuge contains the site of the former Fort Davy Crockett constructed in 1837 to protect trappers against attacks by Blackfoot Native Americans.

brochures

Brochure of Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Browns Park - Brochure

Brochure of Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Browns Park - Map

Map of Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Hunting and Fishing at Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Browns Park - Hunting and Fishing

Hunting and Fishing at Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Browns Park NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Browns_Park/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Browns_Park_National_Wildlife_Refuge Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge is located in Moffat County, Colorado in the extreme northwestern corner of the state, in an isolated mountain valley of Browns Park on both sides of the Green River, approximately 25 miles (40 km) below Flaming Gorge Dam. The refuge contains the site of the former Fort Davy Crockett constructed in 1837 to protect trappers against attacks by Blackfoot Native Americans.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge is located along the Green River in northwest Colorado. Situated between the Cold Springs and Diamond Mountains, this remote river valley has long been an oasis to both wildlife and humans seeking shelter from the surrounding harsh, semi-arid environment. Welcome to Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge This blue goose, designed by J.N. “Ding” Darling, is the symbol of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Throughout time, this sheltered valley known as Browns Park has been and remains a place for wildlife and people. Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was established in 1965 by Public Land Order to provide sanctuary for migratory birds, conserve endangered and threatened species, and offer wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities. Wildlife, solitude, scenic beauty, and cultural history combine to make the Refuge a national treasure. The 12,150-acre Browns Park NWR is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Refuge is one of over 560 refuges in the National Wildlife Refuge System – a network of lands set aside specifically for wildlife. The Refuge System is a living heritage, conserving wildlife and habitat for people today and for generations to come. Western meadowlark The Green River flowing through Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge. History of Browns Park 2-Bar Ranch Archaeological studies at Browns Park show that prehistoric people were present as much as 8,000-10,000 years ago. These people probably visited the area to hunt big game. By approximately 3,500 years ago, the valley was being used by prehistoric farmers to grow corn. In 1832, on land that would later become part of the Refuge, Fort Davy Crockett was built for trading with native tribes. Later, the area was settled by ranchers, and it was frequented by outlaws. Although most of the evidence of these early inhabitants is archaeological, there are a number of historic log cabins still standing. For example, Lodore School and 2-Bar Ranch are listed on the Register of National Historic Places. For more information on Refuge history, please see the historical brochure. Managing Habitat for Wildlife Historically, waterfowl were given management priority on the Refuge. However, Refuge management is now focused on maintaining a variety of native habitats and wildlife with emphasis on all migratory birds, threatened and endangered species, and species of special concern. Thanks to current management techniques, Refuge habitats support a rich diversity of wildlife species including 68 species of mammals, 15 species of reptiles and amphibians, and at least 223 species of birds. Riparian Habitat Damselfly The riparian habitats found along the Green River, and Vermillion and Beaver Creeks at Browns Park NWR are made up of cottonwoods, buffaloberry, willows, and many other plants that are restricted to flood plains or areas with permanent underground water supplies. Similarly, many wildlife species depend on riparian plants to fulfill their life needs. Thousands of migrating songbirds, like the Lazuli bunting and Wilson’s warbler, rely on riparian habitat for food and rest as they travel north to their breeding grounds. Other songbirds, such as the black-chinned hummingbird and Bullock’s oriole, stop to nest. Moose and river otter also raise their young in the riparian area. Water development has caused the Refuge riparian habitats to change over time. The riparian area along the Green River has been affected by the Flaming Gorge Dam. Before construction of the dam, the Green River’s water levels responded solely to the uncertainties of nature. Flooding usually occurred in the spring, tapering off to reduced flows in summer. Spring flooding was the primary source of water for the natural wetlands bordering the river. After construction of the dam in 1962, people began to control the river flows. Human control has resulted in a decrease in spring floods and a reduction in the amount of sediment carried by the river. This has resulted in the gradual deepening of the river channel, further reducing the likelihood of flooding. This makes it difficult for tree and willow roots to reach water and inhibits the germination of new seedlings within the riparian habitat. Field research has confirmed that the riparian cottonwood forests are aging and not being replaced. Instead, nonnative, invasive species such as perennial pepperweed and tamarisk are overtaking this habitat. Pepperweed and tamarisk do not provide forage or appropriate nesting cover for the wildlife species that rely on this area. Research is ongoing to help determine how to increase the regeneration of new cottonwoods and willows in the riparian areas. Wetland Habitat White-faced ibis The seven wetlands at Browns Park NWR provide essential foraging and resting grounds for migratory waterfowl during their spring and fall migrations. During the summer
To Dutch John, Utah 40 miles Beaver Creek 40 Straddle Bottom Accessible Hunting Blind To Vernal, Utah 50 miles (4WD only) Accessible Fishing Pier Green Rive r Flynn Spitzie 4W he el Dr Browns Park i ve Warren On ly Nelson To Maybell, Colorado 50 miles National Wildlife Refuge County Road No Hunting Zone 4 Wheel Drive Only V Paved State Highway River’s Edge Wildlife Drive Refuge Office and Visitor Center Refuge Wetland Open to Waterfowl Hunting Wetland Closed to Waterfowl Hunting Private Land Rest Rooms State Trust Land* Overlook State Trust Wetland Campground Boat Ramps Interpretive Foot Trail ion mill e r eek r C Refuge Boundary *Two sections of State Trust Land border Browns Park NWR. Contact the State Land Board at 970 / 824-2850 for current regulations on State Trust Land.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Browns Park Hunting Regulations Table Hunting is in accordance with State regulations. In addition, Refuge-specifc regulations must be followed, and are listed in the table below and described in this brochure. National Wildlife Refuge Hunting and Fishing Activity Season Dates and Harvest Other Regulations Elk, moose, mule deer, pronghorn antelope State season and regulations apply Coot, duck, goose, merganser State season and regulations apply Hunter access is allowed 1½ hours before sunrise to 1½ hours after sunset. The Refuge spans Colorado Hunting Units 1 and 201, which are limited quota areas and may not be hunted with a general deer or elk license. Hunter access is allowed 1½ hours before sunrise to 1½ hours after sunset. Waterfowl hunting is permitted on Butch Cassidy and Hog Lake wetlands. A section of the Butch Cassidy wetland crosses the Utah State line and requires a Utah State hunting license. The Green River is also open to waterfowl hunting except in the closed areas. Hunters must be within 20 yards of the riverbank. Cottontail rabbit, mourning dove State season and regulations apply Hunter access is allowed 1½ hours before sunrise to 1½ hours after sunset. Only approved non-toxic shot may be possessed and used in the feld. See map for hunting areas The goose is the symbol of the National Wildlife Refuge System, a network of lands and waters managed for the beneft of wildlife and people. Welcome Welcome to Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). Established in 1963, Browns Park NWR contains 12,150 acres of wetland, grassland, and upland habitat along the Green River in northwest Colorado. Browns Park NWR is managed to provide sanctuary for migratory birds, conserve endangered and threatened species, and offer wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities for people. Safety The Refuge is located in a remote and rugged area with no public services. Cell phone coverage is extremely limited. Visitors are highly encouraged to bring extra supplies in case of an emergency, including water, food, and fuel. Gas stations are located 60 miles away in Maybell, Colorado, and 37 miles away in Dutch John, Utah. Prohibited Activities • All commercial guiding and outftting activities. • Carrying, possessing, or discharging freworks or explosives. Special Shot Restrictions Only approved non-toxic shot may be possessed and used in the feld while hunting waterfowl, cottontail rabbits, and mourning doves. When hunting designated species with frearms other than shotgun, non-toxic bullets are highly encouraged to eliminate lead poisoning of wildlife. Horses Horseback riding is permitted. Use of certifed weed-free hay is required to minimize further introduction of invasive plants on the Refuge. Horses are not permitted in the campgrounds. If the corrals by the Swinging Bridge campground are not being used by local ranchers, horses may be kept in these corrals. Vehicles To protect wildlife from disturbance and minimize habitat damage, all motorized vehicles, off-road vehicles (ORVs), and bicycles must stay on developed roads. The speed limit on all Refuge roads is 25 mph unless posted otherwise. Driving off-road by any type of vehicle is prohibited. Watch for seasonal road closure signs March 1 - July 31. Accessibility Equal opportunity to participate in and beneft from programs and activities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is available to all individuals regardless of physical or mental ability. For more information please contact the U.S. Department of the Interior, Offce of Equal Opportunity, https://www.doi.gov/ pmb/eeo/public-civil-rights. Parking Vehicles must park in pull-outs or within 10 feet of the road. Overnight parking is not permitted except for campers in the designated campgrounds. Overnight parking for river foaters is allowed with prior approval from the Refuge staff. Government Property Individuals altering or destroying government property, including cutting or altering boundary fences to access the Refuge, will be prosecuted. Check with the Refuge staff for availability and location of horse or stock gates. • Collecting, possessing, or destroying any plant, or animal or part thereof (alive or dead). Camping Camping is permitted in designated sites only at the campgrounds and is limited to 14 days in a 28-day period. The use of generators is allowed only from 7:00 am to 10:00 pm. • Collection of shed antlers. • Pack out all your trash. Firearms Persons possessing, transporting, or carrying frearms on National Wildlife Refuge System lands must comply with all provisions of State and local law. Persons may only use (discharge) frearms in accordance with refuge regulations (50 CFR 27.42 and specifc refuge regulations in 50 CFR Part 32.) • Campfres are allowed only in the metal fre rings provided at the campgrounds. • Target shooting. • Use or possession of alcohol while hunting. • Campfres should never be left unattended and must be

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