John Martin Reservoir

State Park - Colorado

John Martin Reservoir State Park contains John Martin Reservoir, which is the second largest body of water in Colorado by capacity. It is also known for being a prime birdwatching location. Bent County, Colorado has been documented to have over 400 different species of birds. The namesake reservoir of the park is created by a 118-foot tall (36 m) and 2.6-mile long dam (4.2 km), which goes by the name of John Martin Dam.

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Guide to Colorado State Parks. Published by Colorado Parks & Wildlife.

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John Martin Reservoir SP https://cpw.state.co.us/placestogo/parks/JohnMartinReservoir https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Martin_Reservoir_State_Park John Martin Reservoir State Park contains John Martin Reservoir, which is the second largest body of water in Colorado by capacity. It is also known for being a prime birdwatching location. Bent County, Colorado has been documented to have over 400 different species of birds. The namesake reservoir of the park is created by a 118-foot tall (36 m) and 2.6-mile long dam (4.2 km), which goes by the name of John Martin Dam.
C O L O R A D O PA R K S & W I L D L I F E John Martin Reservoir State Park © JON DE LORENZO ENJOY YOUR STATE PARKS W elcome to John Martin Reservoir State Park, an oasis on the plains of southeastern Colorado. Located in the Lower Arkansas River Valley, present day visitors come to John Martin to take advantage of modern campgrounds, great fishing, uncrowded boating waters, diverse wildlife viewing opportunities and to see historical signs of the past. With 373 documented species of birds in Bent County, John Martin Reservoir is a premier birding area. Past visitors came to the Lower Arkansas River Valley to find shelter in trees along the river, food in the form of wild game and edible plants, and water. Petroglyphs in the area suggest Native Americans camped here. Lt. Zebulon Pike, Kit Carson and many other explorers followed along the Arkansas River. Years later, traders and settlers traveled through the area while on the mountain branch of the Santa Fe Trail. Remnants of this historic trail remain on the North Shore of the park. The dam which created John Martin Reservoir was built between 1939 and 1948 as an irrigation and flood-control project by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Colorado State Parks has managed the Lake Hasty area below the dam, the surface of John Martin Reservoir and a portion of the north shore since October 2001 through a lease agreement with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. John Martin Reservoir State Park 30703 Road 24 • Hasty, CO 81044 • (719) 829-1801 E-mail: johnmartin.statepark@state.co.us cpw.state.co.us Funded in part by Great Outdoors Colorado through Colorado Lottery proceeds. CPW_SEJM_2/18 © CPW/THOMAS KIMMEL Passes And Permits cpw.state.co.us All vehicles entering the park are required to display a current Colorado State Parks Pass. A Daily Parks Pass is valid from the day purchased until noon the following day. An Annual Parks Pass is valid at any Colorado State Park. For annual pass holders who own additional vehicles, multiple passes are available at a reduced fee. The Aspen Leaf is a discounted annual pass for Colorado residents age 64 or older. The Aspen Leaf also allows reduced camping fees on weekdays. Colorado disabled veterans displaying Colorado Disabled Veteran (DV) license plates are admitted free without a park pass. In addition to a parks pass, campers are required to purchase and display a camping permit at their campsite. Passes and permits are available at the visitor center and self service stations. Picnicking Picnic sites, located throughout the park, are available on a first-come first-serve basis. Picnic tables and grills located in both the Point and Lake Hasty campgrounds are reserved for registered campers. Group Facilities Group picnic and camping facilities are available. Reservations are required. Please call the visitor center at (719) 829-1801 for more information or to make reservations. Camping John Martin Reservoir State Park has a total of 213 campsites, which can accommodate recreational vehicles, trailers and tents. Each campsite has a picnic table and fire ring. The Lake Hasty Campground, located below the dam provides plentiful shade with large trees. All campsites have electrical hook-ups and modern facilities including centrally located water hydrants, coin operated showers and laundry facilities, and flush toilets. Some campsites are available year-round. The Point Campground, located on the north shore, sits on a ridge over looking the reservoir. It is a basic campground, there is no electricity, water or shade. Each site contains a picnic table and fire ring and has stunning views of the reservoir and surrounding landscape. The Point Campground is open for year round camping. For campsite reservations, call 1800-244-5613 or visit us online at www.cpw.co.us. Campgrounds are patrolled for your safety and assistance. Please camp only in designated campsites and display your camping permit in the campsite marker. A valid park pass is required on every vehicle, for every day you are in the park. Check out time is noon. Dump Station Swimming A dump station is located across from the Lake Hasty entrance and open year round. It is illegal and a health hazard to dump any waste or sewage (including dishwater) anywhere except into the dump station. The only designated swim beach is at Lake Hasty below the dam. Swimming is at your own risk. No lifeguards are provided, so swimmers are urged to use caution. Children 11 years or younger must be supervised. Cliff diving and rock jumping are prohibited. The Lake Hasty Swim Beach is open Memorial Day to Labor Day. Accessibility The Lake Hasty area has parking spaces and campsites that are accessible for people with disabilities. An accessible fishing pier and picnic site is available on the west shoreline of Lake Hasty. Restrooms, showers, picnic tables, drinking fountains and grills are also accessible. Hiking The 4.5 mile Red Shin Hiking Trail begins below the dam
C O L O R A D O P A R K S & W I L D L I F E John Martin Reservoir State Park FACT SHEET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2017 Who we are John Martin Reservoir was the first state park in southeastern Colorado and is called a “sapphire on the plains.” When full, John Martin Reservoir is one of the largest reservoirs in the state, and it is known for its excellent fishing, boating and waterfowl hunting. The park is also a bird-watcher’s paradise with a diverse community of over 400 resident and migratory birds. The mild southeast Colorado weather provides year-round opportunities for outdoor recreation. Visitors to John Martin State Park spend about $8.7 million annually at local businesses.1 Top attractions • The reservoir provides uncrowded boating and waterskiing, as well as spectacular conditions for a wide variety of wind watersports. • Many fishing and hunting opportunities. Casting from shore or boat, anglers catch walleye, saugeye, bass, wiper, crappie, perch and catfish. • The park is recognized as one of the premier birding locations in the interior U.S., including a designation by the Audubon Society as an “Important Bird Area.” • The park is close to several southeastern Colorado historic landmarks, including: Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site in La Junta, the Big Timbers Museum in Lamar, the Kit Carson Museum in Las Animas, the Camp Amache National Historic Landmark in Granada, the Boggsville Historic Site in Las Animas, and the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in Eads. • Year round wildlife viewing and camping. • U.S. Army Corps of Engineers • Bent County • Southeast Colorado Regional Tourism Group Challenges we face • Working with U.S. Army Corps to improve our delivery of programs to the public. Although we can no longer take advantage of costsharing opportunities, we should seek to combine efforts where possible to ensure that visiting this eastern plains park remains a pleasant outdoor experience for customers. • Identifying opportunities to purchase water in order to maintain water levels for boating and other flat water recreation activities. • Developing a marketing plan that targets boaters, campers and anglers along the Front Range of Colorado and nearby states. • Continuing to work toward a more comprehensive trail management and improvement plan. • Supplementing operational and staffing costs by expanding our volunteer forces, particularly during the high season. Volunteer Activities The campground host program provides valuable services to campers and assists park staff during the long camping season. 1Source: Corona Research, Colorado State Parks Marketing Assessment, “Visitor Spending Analysis 2008-2009” (adjusted for inflation). COLORADO PARKS & WILDLIFE 6060 Broadway, Denver, CO 80216 (303) 297-1192 cpw.state.co.us VIC SCHENDEL/CPW Our partners 30703 Co. Rd. 24, Hasty, CO, 81044 (719) 829-1801 • Email: john.martin.park@state.co.us Park Manager: Dan Kirmer As of July 1, 2017 Trails Biking: 4.5 miles Hiking: 4.5 miles Horseback: 3 miles Total: 4.5 miles Employees Permanent: 4 Temporary: 12 Volunteers: 23 Volunteer Hours: 908 Geography Region: Southeast County: Bent Year Acquired: 2001 Elevation: 3,851 ft Miles From Denver: 215 Roads Paved: 4.5 miles Unpaved: 8 miles Annual Visitation 413,383 Acreage Total Acres: 12,286 Facilities 3 Boat Ramps Dump Station 3 Group Picnic Areas Laundry 20 Picnic Sites Showers (coin-operated) Visitor Center Governmental US Cong Dist: 4th CO Senate: 35th CO House: 64th Recreation Boating Fishing Ice Fishing Ice Skating Ice Fishing Ranger/Nature Programs Sailboarding Swimming Wildlife/Bird Viewing Winter Camping Walden Fort Collins Craig Hayden Steamboat Springs Sterling Estes Loveland Park Greeley Oak Creek Fort Brush Morgan Meeker Kremmling Wray Brighton Denver Golden Avon Vail Rifle Frisco Glenwood Springs Breckenridge Collbran Fruita Aspen Leadville Castle Rock Limon Burlington Camping Campsites (basic, seasonal): 42 Campsites (basic, year-round): 62 Campsites (electrical, seasonal): 55 Campsites (electrical, year-round): 54 Group Facilities (year-round): 3 Fairplay Grand Junction Delta Paonia Hotchkiss Buena Vista Crawford Colorado Springs Kit Carson Cripple Creek Olathe Gunnison Montrose Salida Canon City Pueblo Ridgway Ouray Lamar La Junta John Martin Reservoir Dove Creek Walsenburg Monte Vista Dolores Cortez Durango La Veta Springfield Trinidad THOMAS KIMMEL/CPW Mancos Alamosa Pagosa Springs COLORADO PARKS & WILDLIFE 6060 Broadway, Denver, CO 80216 (303) 297-1192 cpw.state.co.us THOMAS KIMMEL/CPW John Martin Reservoir State Park
John Martin Reservoir FIELD NOTES State Park Discovering... Western Tanager Birds CHECKLIST of Birds of John Martin Reservoir State Park and Bent County, Colorado. John Martin Reservoir and surrounding Bent County, Colorado, is one of the premier birding locations in the interior United States, and is recognized nationally as an “Important Bird Area” (IBA). The great majority of birds in Bent County are found within the boundaries of John Martin Reservoir. Many bird species are restricted to a very specific habitat. The key to finding species diversity is looking in proper habitat. Bent County is home to many different birding areas including, but not limited to the areas that are listed in this brochure. This checklist includes birds that can be seen at John Martin Reservoir and other areas of Bent County as well as birds that can only be found in certain areas of the county. We would like to thank Duane Nelson for his help toward the creation of this brochure. His hard work created this list of birds that can be seen in all of Bent County. Killdeer ABUNDANCE CODES KEY TO SYMBOLS * confirmed breeder ^ probable though unconfirmed breeder Res: yearlong resident breeding Mig: present during migration only Su: John Martin Reservoir State Park 30703 Road 24, Hasty, CO 81044 (719) 829-1801 E-mail: john.martin.park@state.co.us www.parks.state.co.us CSP-JM-18M-5/06 Roadrunner migrant bird that remains through summer A: Abundant, seen in numbers on every visit to appropriate habitat C: Common, seen in smaller numbers in appropriate habitat U: Uncommon, present but may not be seen on all visits R: Rare, predictable in occurrence, but may be absent some years Sp: Spring migrant only Fa: Fall migrant only VR: not expected, but multiple county records SV: summer visitor, with no evidence of nesting X: Accidental, only one or two records, few records for Colorado Wi: migrant bird that remains throughout the winter I: Irruptive, usually absent, but can be common in flight years BIRDING SITES IN BENT COUNTY John Martin Reservoir State Park includes Lake Hasty Campground and much of the northeast portion of John Martin Reservoir. Both sites provide excellent birding opportunities throughout the seasons. John Martin State Wildlife area includes the entirety of the reservoir, and adjacent marshes, riparian forests and upland habitat west nearly to the city of Las Animas. 3. Fort Lyon State Wildlife Easement – only one mile south of Wood Thrush Grove, this may be the largest elm grove in Colorado. The best access is from Road HH, 0.2 miles west of County Road 16. A recent drought has killed many of the elm trees, increasing the population of woodpeckers, and possibly reducing the number of other land birds. This is another of Colorado’s premier land bird migration hotspots. Take care not to disturb nesting Great Blue Herons, recent colonists. Additional birding sites in Bent County: 1. Van’s Grove – Part of the John Martin State Wildlife Area, this birding site is located on County Road JJ 0.8 mile west of Bent County Road 18, and 1.2 miles east of Bent County Road 17. The low elm trees in this abandoned homestead make viewing skulking birds easy, while the isolated nature of the grove make it an oasis for migrant land birds. Most species of eastern warblers recorded in Colorado have been seen in this unlikely migrant trap. 2. Wood Thrush Grove – Part of the John Martin State Wildlife Area, this site is a tiny oasis of tall trees with abundant undergrowth on the southeast corner of Bent County Roads 16 and JJ. This site is only 2.2 miles west of Van’s Grove. Another of Colorado’s premier sites to look for migrant land birds. 4. Ft. Lyon Marshes – One excellent marsh is at the right-angle turn where Bent County Road 16 becomes Bent County Road HH. This is currently a good place to listen for rails and bitterns after dark. Marshes in this area have historically hosted rare sparrows (including LeConte’s) in the winter, but the invasion of cottonwood and tamarisk trees has greatly compromised this habitat. NOTE: Please follow American Birding Association ethical guidelines and refrain from playing tapes to draw these sensitive species into view. Listen quietly and consider counting marsh birds as “heard only”. 5. Green Heron Slough – located 0.25 miles south of Bent County Road HH, immediately opposite the Fort Lyon State Wildlife Easement. A perennial stream flows through the dike draining the Ft. Lyon Hospital/Prison, and provides habitat for water-loving migrants and resident birds. The huge cattail marsh east of the slough hosts almost every marsh bird species, including rails, bitterns, sparrows and wrens. 6. Adobe Creek Reservoir/Blue Lakes – located 13 miles north of Las Animas on Bent County Road 10. There is a stock pond on Road 10 8.1 miles north of State Highway 194 that, when containing water, can be excellent for longspurs (especially McCown’s) in winter, as well as ducks a
John Martin History Regulations The Bald Eagle is truly an all-American bird – it is the only eagle unique to North America. It ranges over most of the continent, from the northern reaches of Alaska and Canada south to northern Mexico. • The State Park is open from 5 am to 10 pm daily. A Colorado State Parks Pass is required on all vehicles. • The State Park closes campsites 39 through 109 in the treed area of the Lake Hasty Campground from November 1 to March 31 of each year to provide an undisturbed and protected area for Bald Eagles to roost, loaf, hunt, and/or rest. The large trees in this area also help protect the eagles from the wind and weather. Visitors to the Park during this time should be particularly careful in controlling their pets and noise levels if Bald Eagles are roosting in the area. • Both the north and south shore areas of John Martin and the reservoir are closed to all public access from the waterfowl closure line east to the dam from November 1 to the end of waterfowl season or as posted. • Bald Eagles are protected by the Endangered Species Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. Anyone who harasses or harms a Bald Eagle may be assessed a maximum penalty of $100,000, up to three years in jail, suspension of hunting and fishing privileges, and/or forfeiture of any vehicles/vessels used in the disturbance. When America adopted the Bald Eagle as its national symbol in 1782, as many as 100,000 nesting Bald Eagles lived in the continental United States, excluding Alaska. However, due to years of human persecution, habitat loss, food source reduction, and impaired reproduction caused by environmental contaminants, especially DDT, only 417 nesting pairs were found in the lower 48 states by 1963. The Bald Eagle was listed as endangered throughout most of its range (including Colorado) under the Endangered Species Preservation Act of 1966 and the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Today the American Bald Eagle has made a tremendous comeback. Since the banning of DDT in 1972 and with intensive protection efforts through partnerships between federal, state, and local governments, conservation organizations, universities, corporations and thousands of individual Americans, Bald Eagle populations have increased throughout much of the United States over the past three decades. As a result it is estimated today that there are over 5000 nesting pairs of Bald Eagles. The Bald Eagle was reclassified from endangered to threatened throughout its range in the lower 48 states in 1995 and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service proposed de-listing the Bald Eagle in 1999. To date no final determination has been made on this de-listing proposal. For Further Information Colorado State Parks John Martin Reservoir State Park 30703 Rd. 24 Hasty, CO 81044 719-829-1801 john.martin.park@state.co.us www.parks.state.co.us Colorado Division of Wildlife Lamar Area Office 1204 East Olive Lamar, CO 81052 719-336-6600 Department of Natural Resources 1313 Sherman Street, #718 Denver, CO 80203 303-866-3311 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers John Martin Reservoir 29955 Rd. 25.75 Hasty, CO 81044 719-336-3476 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 755 Parfet Street, Suite 361 Lakewood, CO 80215 303-275-2370 www.fws.gov at John Martin Reservoir State Park Physical Characteristics The Bald Eagle is the most recognized raptor (bird of prey) in North America. The Bald Eagle is a large brownish-black bird with distinctive white head and tail feathers, which appear only after the bird, is 4 to 5 years old. Young Bald Eagles are mostly dark brown until they reach four to six years of age and may be confused with the golden eagle. This striking raptor has large, pale eyes; a powerful yellow beak; and great black talons. Females can weigh up to 14 pounds and have a wingspan up to 8 feet. Males are smaller, weighing 7 to 10 pounds with a wingspan of 6 feet. The bird’s life span in the wild can reach 30 years. Eagles at John Martin Habitat & Diet Bald Eagles are found in association with estuaries, large lakes, reservoirs, major rivers, and some seacoast areas. In winter, Bald Eagles congregate at specific wintering sites that are generally close to open water and offer good perch trees and roost sites. Roost sites are usually in tall trees in areas that are protected from the wind, weather, and human disturbance. Their diet consists largely of fish and waterfowl, but also includes upland birds, small mammals (prairie dogs, rabbits, etc.), and carrion. Bald Eagles are skilled hunters, but are opportunistic predators and will steal prey captured by other raptors. During the winter months, Bald Eagles can be seen throughout the area flying, standing on the ice, and perched or roosting in tall trees. John Martin Reservoir and the surrounding area are considered essential winter habitat based on the number of eagles using the area and duration of use. In January of 2001 an aerial census documented 58 eagle
endangered birds 7/10/02 11:51 AM Page 1 © Bob Gress © Bob Gress Interior Least Tern The adult breeding Piping Plover is a small © Bob Gress Piping Plover For further information about Piping Plovers and Least Terns, please contact: Colorado State Parks John Martin Reservoir State Park PO Box 149 Hasty, CO 81044 719-336-1690 www.parks.state.co.us The Least Tern is a small swallowlike bird with black outer wing feathers and a slightly forked tail. The black head, white forehead with sandy-gray colored bird with a white breast throat. Smaller than a robin, the Piping Plover has orange legs and an orange bill with a black tip. The Piping Plover searches © Bob Gre ss the shorelines for insects to eat. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers John Martin Reservoir 29955 County Road 25.75 Hasty, CO 81044 719-336-3476 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 755 Parfet Street, Suite 361 Lakewood, CO 80215 303-275-2370 www.fws.gov Cover photos: Piping Plover hatchling © Bob Gress; Piping Plover and Interior Least Tern © D. Robert Franz Printed on recycled paper with at least 30% post-consumer waste black eye stripes, yellow legs, and yellow bill contrast with its pale gray body and white belly. Least Terns eat mainly small fishes and catch them by diving into shallow Sharing the Shoreline Help us conserve the Least Terns and Piping Plovers water areas. Gress © Bob and one distinctive dark band around its Colorado Division of Wildlife Lamar Area Office 1204 East Olive Lamar, CO 81052 719-336-6600 endangered birds 7/10/02 11:51 AM Page 2 The Interior Least Tern and the Piping plovers for nesting. Both birds nest in small, shallow depressions that they excavate and raise their AREA CLOSED TO ALL PUBLIC ACCESS It is impossible to mark all of birds and their young may reside at John Martin the nesting sites. Regardless Reservoir until late September before they begin of whether or not the areas are their migration south. (INCLUDING PETS) Plover share the shorelines of John Martin, Adobe n Nelso uane D © ns. Creek (Blue Lake), st Ter r Lea io r e t In Great Plains, Timber Lake, and many Adult other reservoirs of southeast Colorado with a growing number of campers, fishermen, and other outdoor enthusiasts. These two species of birds young along the shorelines and on man-made islands. The nests are very hard to see. Nesting success varies from year to year depending upon water levels, vegetative encroachment, local weather conditions, predators, and human disturbance. While considerable research still needs to be done, nest and chick loss appear to be a major factor are also threatened with extinction. limiting the growth of both species. At John Martin The Least Tern was federally listed as endangered Reservoir, predation and human disturbance are in 1985 under the Endangered Species Act and major causes of nest and chick loss. January of marked with signs, harassment or harm of either terns or plovers (including adults, young, eggs, or nests) is a violation of both state and federal law. Violations are punishable by fines up to $100,000, up to three years in jail, suspension harm of an endangered species. added to to all public access (including Colorado’s pets) during the nesting threatened conserve these endangered species by avoiding active nesting areas and not disturbing the birds. The best action to take upon observing a closure or an unmarked nest site is to avoid it completely! An adult Piping Plover on the shoreline. © Duane Nelson and brooding season. This Both birds will lay creamy white to tan colored, action is necessary to speckled eggs in the nest. Terns typically lay up Outdoor prevent disturbance to or to three eggs and plovers up to four eggs. They enthusiasts destruction of nests, adult often share the same nesting areas but the Piping enjoy a birds, or hatchlings. Plover usually nests singly and Least Terns typically list in 1996. variety of An Interior Least Tern nest. © Duane Nelson are often the same areas used by terns and birds, but much remains to be done. Please help us in the disturbance. Any trespass into manageable. In addition to public education efforts of the shoreline are closed the shoreline areas that people use for recreation is being made towards securing a future for these forfeiture of any vehicles/vessels used is viewed as harassment and/or such as this brochure, portions activities at John Martin Reservoir. Unfortunately, well as habitat protection and restoration, progress of hunting and fishing privileges, and/or Of these causes, human disturbance is the most 1986 and recreation With continued public education and research, as a closure area by people or pets listed by Colorado as endangered in 1996. Piping Plovers were federally listed as threatened in THREATENED AND ENDANGERED SPECIES LEAST TERN / PIPING PLOVER NESTING AREA These closures are posted with signs and/or simple fencing, alerting people on shore to th
COLORADO PA R K S & WILDLIFE Your Guide to Colorado’s 41 State Parks 2018 Edition cpw.state.co.us CAMPING RESERVATIONS • 1-800-244-5613 • cpw.state.co.us i Welcome to Your State Parks! Wherever you go in Colorado, there’s Cheyenne Mountain a state park waiting to welcome State Park you. Mountains or prairies, rivers or forests, out in the country or next to the city… Colorado’s 41 state parks are as diverse as the state itself, and they offer something for everyone. Take a hair-raising whitewater river trip, or kick back in a lawn chair and watch the sunset. Enjoy a family picnic, cast a line in the water, take a hike, ride a horse, try snowshoeing or discover geocaching. From Eastern Plains parks at 3,800 feet to high-mountain parks at 9,500, the network of state parks offers a wealth of activities for busy people of all ages, or the chance to do nothing at all. You can play on land or on water. On a high peak or on the prairie. In the country or the city. In spring, summer, winter or fall. Golden Gate Canyon State Park State parks are great places for families. There are plenty of activities for families to enjoy together such as boating, hiking or picnicking, as well as organized nature walks, talks and events. Junior Ranger programs, activity backpacks, kid-friendly hikes and fishing ponds for kids are among the many offerings for youth. From toddler to teen and adult to senior, every family member can enjoy their activity of choice, then come together to share a meal and stories around the campfire. Whether you’re an active outdoor recreationist or prefer to spend time watching clouds go by, you’ll enjoy the special moments waiting for you in the state parks. Rifle Gap State Park Cover photos: Large photo: State Forest State Park; lower left: Pearl Lake State Park; lower center: Elkhead State Park; lower right: Lory State Park Plan Your Visit Colorado’s state parks are open every day of the year, weather permitting. Day-use areas are generally open from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m., and some parks may have closed gates after hours. Campgrounds are open 24 hours a day. Contact individual parks for hours of operation. Check our website for seasonal or maintenance closures: cpw.state.co.us Entrance Passes All Colorado state parks charge an entrance fee. Cost of a daily pass may vary by park ($7–$9). A pass covers all occupants of a vehicle and is valid until noon the day after purchase. Some parks may charge a per-person fee for cyclists and walk-ins. Fees are used to help pay operating costs. Cherry Creek State Park charges an additional fee for the Cherry Creek Basin Water Quality Authority. Annual Pass Who doesn’t love a deal? And the state parks annual pass is a great one. For just one low price, the annual pass lets you enjoy all 41 state parks for unlimited visits for 12 months from date of purchase. That’s all the parks. That’s unlimited times. The annual pass pays for itself in as few as 10 visits. If you’re a Colorado resident who’s 64 years or older, there’s even a further discounted Aspen Leaf annual pass. There are also passes for disabled and income-eligible residents. For details and to purchase a pass, visit a Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) office, state park or buy online: cpw.state.co.us Extend Your Stay Make more of your state park visit by staying overnight. Bring your tent or RV, spend a cozy night in a cabin, camp in a tipi or discover a comfortable, year-round alternative State Forest State Park to traditional camping with a yurt. All together, the state parks have more than 4,000 campsites and 58 cabins and yurts. Almost 300 campsites are ADA accessible. Many parks offer campsites or cabins for large groups. Heated cabins and yurts make a park getaway suitable any season of the year. Camping Reservations Summer weekends fill up quickly so advance reservations for overnight stays are recommended. Reservations can be made six months to three days ahead of arrival. Reserve online: cpw.state.co.us Toll Free: 1-800-244-5613 A nonrefundable reservation fee applies to bookings, and visitors must purchase a daily or annual entrance pass in addition to paying camping and reservation fees. Unreserved sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. 1 What Can I Do There? Colorado’s state parks are places to have fun, get away, recreate and re-create. Here are some park activities to help you do that: Fishing Top-notch fishing awaits anglers in 37 state parks across Colorado. Think Gold Medal Waters and trophy fish. A valid fishing license is required for all anglers 16 years and older. Licenses and our annual Colorado Fishing regulations brochure are available online, at most parks and at CPW authorized sales agents. Water Sports Many state parks are built around a lake or Crawford waterway, which means boating and other water State Park sports are among the headliners. Larger parks offer boat rentals and full-service marinas. Any boat with a motor or sail operated in Col
C O L O R A D O P A R K S & W I L D L I F E 2020 Colorado State Recreation Lands INSIDE: STATE FISH UNITS, STATE WILDLIFE AREAS, STATE TRUST LANDS, STATE PARKS cpw.state.co.us ONLINE FEATURES Check out more Colorado Parks & Wildlife on our VIMEO & YOUTUBE CHANNELS LINKS TO MAPS MAKE CAMPING & HUNTING RESERVATIONS ONLINE! STATE WILDLIFE AREAS STATE FISHING WATERS STATE TRUST LANDS STATE PARKS Cherry Creek State Park © Nora Logue VIDEOS CHECK OUT THE 360 VIDEOS OF COLORADO’S STATE PARKS! 101 PLACES TO TAKE A KID FISHING #TAKEAKIDFISHING G.E.M. TRAIL NOW OPEN IN STEAMBOAT SPRINGS! CONTENTS CONTENTS Printed for free distribution by: WHAT’S NEW: 2020................................................1 cpw.state.co.us COLORADO PARKS AND WILDLIFE (CPW) 6060 Broadway, Denver, CO 80216 ■ 303-297-1192 RESERVATIONS......................................................1 OUR MISSION: The mission of Colorado Parks and Wildlife is to perpetuate the wildlife resources of the state, to provide a quality state parks system and to provide enjoyable and sustainable outdoor recreation opportunities that educate and inspire current and future generations to serve as active stewards of Colorado’s natural resources. ■ Abbreviation key................................................................................1 STATE FISH UNITS (SFUs)........................................2 ■ What is an SFU?..................................................................................2 ■ SFU properties & regulations..............................................................2 COLORADO PARKS AND WILDLIFE DIRECTOR Dan Prenzlow COLORADO PARKS AND WILDLIFE COMMISSION MEMBERS, as of July 2020 STATE WILDLIFE AREAS (SWAs)......................... 3–29 Marvin McDaniel, Chair Carrie Besnette Hauser, Vice-Chair Marie Haskett, Secretary Taishya Adams Betsy Blecha Charles Garcia Dallas May ■ What is an SWA?.................................................................................3 ■ SWA access rules................................................................................3 ■ SWA properties & regulations..................................................... 4–29 STATE TRUST LANDS (STLs) PUBLIC ACCESS PROGRAM.............................. 30–51 ■ What are trust lands? What is the STL public access program?.............30 ■ State trust lands FAQs/access rules...................................................30 ■ State trust lands public access properties & regulations............ 31–51 REGULATION BROCHURE EDITOR Chelsea Harlan PRINTED STATE PARKS................................................. 52–59 The Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife (CPW) receives federal financial assistance from multiple bureaus within the U.S. Department of the Interior. Under Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act (as amended), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (as amended), the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the U.S. Department of the Interior and its bureaus prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, disability or age. In addition, CPW adheres to all antidiscrimination laws of the state of Colorado. For more information on how to request an accommodation or to file a grievance, please visit cpw.state.co.us/accessibility. MAPS............................................................ 60–65 ■ State fish units, wildlife areas, trust lands & parks — Northeast ..........60 ■ State fish units, wildlife areas, trust lands & parks — Southeast ..........61 ■ State fish units, wildlife areas, trust lands & parks — Northwest .........62 ■ State fish units, wildlife areas, trust lands & parks — Southwest ........63 ■ NEW State fish units, wildlife areas, trust lands & parks — Central close-up.............................64 ■ Game management units (GMUs)....................................................65 NOTICE: Laws and regulations in this brochure are paraphrased for easier understanding and are intended only as a guide. Complete Colorado wildlife statutes and regulations are available at CPW offices listed below and online: cpw.state.co.us/regulations CPW REGIONAL AND AREA OFFICE LOCATIONS ADMINISTRATION 1313 Sherman St., #618 Denver, 80203 303-297-1192 (M–F, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. MT) LANDS INDEX BY COUNTY............................... 66–73 ■ State fish units, state wildlife areas, state trust lands, state parks GET THE BROCHURE ONLINE: cpw.state.co.us/rec-lands Send us your outdoor photos and stories for a chance to be featured on a brochure cover or CPW's online blog! HUNTER.TESTIMONIALS@STATE.CO.US COVER: ▶ Gone fishing at Sylvan Lake State Park. © Dustin Doskocil for CPW OTHER PHOTOS, LEFT TO RIGHT: ▶ Mountain biking at Trinidad Lake State Park. © Thomas Kimmell for CPW C O L O R A D O P A R K S & INSIDE: STATE FISH UNITS, STAT
WHAT'S NEW C O L O R A D O P A R K S & LICENSES W I L D L I F E 2021 Colorado Fishing SEASON: MARCH 1, 2021–MARCH 31, 2022 cpw.state.co.us 2021 FISHING BROCHURE CORRECTION UPDATED: APRIL 19, 2021 Please see the Colorado Parks and Wildlife website at cpw.state.co.us/regulations for complete regulation information. NOTE: THE ONLINE VERSION OF THE BROCHURE HAS THE MOST UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION, INCLUDING ANY CORRECTIONS. PAGE(S) CORRECTION AS PRINTED IN BROCHURE LICENSE REQUIREMENTS PAGE 1 The qualifying age for applying for a senior lifetime low-income fishing license was incorrectly listed as 65 and older at the time of publication. The correct information is: Senior lifetime low-income fishing licenses are available for Colorado residents age 64 and older. Go online for full eligibility requirements: cpw.state. co.us The online version of the brochure has been updated with this correction. page 1 2021 FISHING BROCHURE CORRECTION UPDATED: MARCH 12, 2021 Please see the Colorado Parks and Wildlife website at cpw.state.co.us/regulations for complete regulation information. NOTE: THE ONLINE VERSION OF THE BROCHURE HAS THE MOST UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION, INCLUDING ANY CORRECTIONS. PAGE(S) CORRECTION AS PRINTED IN BROCHURE BACK PAGE BACK COVER The contest start date for Take a Friend Fishing was incorrect at the time of publication. The correct information is: The contest starts APRIL 1, 2021! Go online for contest rules and how to enter: cpw.state.co.us/ takeafriend The online version of the brochure has been updated with this correction. back cover ONLINE FEATURES Check out more Colorado Parks & Wildlife on our VIMEO & YOUTUBE CHANNELS VIDEOS FISHING FOR HIP HOP: COLORADO STYLE FISHING FUNDS CONSERVATION 101 PLACES TO TAKE A KID FISHING © CPW GET THE CPW FISHING APPS: The CPW Fishing app can help you discover over 1,300 fishing locations, check local conditions, read up on regulations and more! The CPW Match a Hatch app can help you match your fly to the same insects where you’re fishing! CO OUTDOORS “QUICK TIP”: SPINCAST REELS CONTENTS CONTENTS Printed for free distribution by: WHAT’S NEW: 2021................................................ 1 cpw.state.co.us LICENSE INFORMATION...................................... 1–2 COLORADO PARKS AND WILDLIFE (CPW) 6060 Broadway, Denver, CO 80216 ■ 303-297-1192 ■ License & Habitat Stamp fees........................................................................1 ■ What you need to buy a fishing license; license requirements......................1 ■ Residency requirements; Habitat Stamps; anglers with disabilities..............2 OUR MISSION: The mission of Colorado Parks and Wildlife is to perpetuate the wildlife resources of the state, to provide a quality state parks system and to provide enjoyable and sustainable outdoor recreation opportunities that educate and inspire current and future generations to serve as active stewards of Colorado’s natural resources. GENERAL INFORMATION.................................... 3–7 Dan Prenzlow ■ Fishery programs: Gold Medal Waters; Wild Trout; stream surveys.................3 ■ State records program: Records by Weight; Records by Length......................4 ■ State Records by Weight award table.............................................................4 ■ Master Angler program; award lengths.........................................................5 ■ Help improve your fisheries............................................................................5 ■ Aquatic Nuisance Species (ANS).....................................................................6 ■ Fishing terms glossary...................................................................................7 ■ Online fishing information resources.............................................................7 FISHING LAWS................................................. 8–10 ■ Legal fishing methods....................................................................................8 ■ Special conditions & restrictions...............................................................8−9 ■ Statewide bag & possession limits...............................................................10 ■ MAP: Wiper/white bass & walleye/saugeye bag limits................................10 SPECIAL REGULATIONS: FISHING WATERS........11–39 ■ MAP: Upper Arkansas River.........................................................................12 ■ MAP: Blue River Basin.................................................................................13 ■ MAP: Middle Colorado & Eagle Rivers..........................................................15 ■ MAP: Upper Colorado River — Headwaters to Radium...............................16 ■ MAP: Conejos & Alamosa River Drainages...................................................18 ■ MAP: Upper Gunnison Basin — Taylor Park Res. to Blue Mesa Res..............19 ■ MAP: NEW North Fork Gunnison Basin — Hotchkiss to McClure

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