Arapaho

National Wildlife Refuge - Colorado

The Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge is located in North Park in central Jackson County south of the town of Walden, Colorado. The refuge furnishes waterfowl with a suitable place to nest and rear their young. It was created in part to offset losses of nesting habitat in the prairie wetland region of the Midwest.

maps

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Parks Ranger District in Routt National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Routt MVUM - Parks 2018

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Parks Ranger District in Routt National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

brochures

Map of Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Arapaho - Map

Map of Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Hunting and Fishing brochure of Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Arapaho - Hunting and Fishing

Hunting and Fishing brochure of Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Wildlife of Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Arapaho - Wildlife

Wildlife of Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Colorado. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Arapaho NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/arapaho/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arapaho_National_Wildlife_Refuge The Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge is located in North Park in central Jackson County south of the town of Walden, Colorado. The refuge furnishes waterfowl with a suitable place to nest and rear their young. It was created in part to offset losses of nesting habitat in the prairie wetland region of the Midwest.
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U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge Hunting and Fishing A Home for Wildlife This goose, designed by J.N. “Ding” Darling, is the symbol of the National Wildlife Refuge System. be found in the general information leaflet and other leaflets displayed at the Refuge headquarters and kiosks. Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was established in 1967 as a place for waterfowl and other migratory birds to nest and rear their young. It was created in part to compensate for habitat that has been lost to development in the prairie pothole region of the Midwest. Most of Arapaho NWR was purchased with money derived from the sale of Federal Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamps (“Duck Stamps”). The intent of this hunting and fishing brochure is to prevent violations, so please familiarize yourself with the Refuge regulations. Respect other hunters and anglers who may be in close proximity to you. Handle firearms safely. Persons possessing, transporting, or carrying firearms on National Wildlife Refuge System lands must comply with all provisions of State and local law. Persons may only use (discharge) firearms in accordance with refuge regulations (50 CFR 27.42 and specific refuge regulations in 50 CFR Part 32). Discharge of a firearm for any reason other than the legal taking of game animals is prohibited. The Refuge is one of more than 550 refuges in the National Wildlife Refuge System - a network of lands set aside specifically for wildlife. Managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Refuge System is a living heritage, preserving wildlife and habitat for people today and for generations to come. Hunting and fishing, in accordance with Service policies and Refuge regulations, promotes quality outdoor recreation opportunities as well as assisting with land management. Harvest of fish and wildlife helps keep population numbers in balance with available habitat to promote healthy ecosystems and wildlife populations. Fishing Regulations The Refuge provides prime habitat for a variety of wildlife. The irrigated meadows are ideal for nesting waterfowl and other birds. Riparian areas offer excellent habitat for moose, elk, and deer. The sagebrush flats and knolls are used by upland game birds and pronghorn. Fishing is allowed on the Illinois River south of County Road 32 during daylight hours only. Fishing maybe closed seasonally during low river flows. If so, signs will be posted at the Moose-Goose Trail, headquarters bridge, and at the headquarters. The Refuge ponds are closed to fishing since they do not support catchable fish due to winter ice and shallow waters. Ice fishing is not allowed on the Refuge. Live bait and lead sinkers are not allowed to reduce invasive fish species and lead poisoning in wildlife. Due to the shallow water, narrow stream channel, and heavy willow growth, boats are not allowed on the river. Fall migration reaches its height in late September or early October when up to 8,000 waterfowl may be on the Refuge. Most mammals can be observed year-round. More information about Arapaho NWR’s wildlife, habitats, management, and recreational opportunities can All fishing is closed from June 1 July 31 to protect nesting birds. Fishing is closed during pronghorn rifle seasons and elk seasons 1-4 in Units 17 and 171. Hunting seasons will be posted at the information area by the entrance to the Refuge headquarters. Hunting Regulations Hunting is permitted according to Federal and State regulations, and the following special regulations. Hunters must possess all applicable Federal and State licenses. The Refuge is open only to the hunting activities specifically stated in the table below. All hunting closes on the Refuge on December 31 annually. If in doubt as to any regulation, contact a Refuge Officer at 970 / 723 8202. Hours The Refuge is open from one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset. Hunting Areas Hunting is permitted only in the designated hunting areas posted and shown on the map. Hunting is prohibited within 100 feet of roads and parking areas. Firearms Only legal shotguns, muzzleloaders, rifles, and hand-held bows meeting State regulations are permitted. Non-toxic shot must be used for all shotgun hunting on the Refuge. It is illegal to use or possess lead shot while in the field. Hunting Seasons Small Game Sage Grouse Cottontail, Jackrabbit Access Vehicle travel is limited to improved gravel roads. Vehicles must be parked in parking areas so that access by other Refuge vistors is not hindered. Camping Overnight camping and open fires are prohibited. Retrieving Retrieving game from areas closed to hunting is prohibited. Regulate your shooting so that game does not fall into “Closed to Hunting” zones of the Refuge. Blinds and Boats Using a portable blind or natural vegetation as a blind is permitted. However, cutting or manipulating natural vegetation for a blind is prohibited. Blinds and decoy
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge Wildlife List Home for Wildlife This goose, designed by J.N. “Ding” Darling, is the symbol of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is located in an intermountain glacial basin south of Walden, the county seat of Jackson County, Colorado. The Refuge was established in 1967 to provide migratory birds with a suitable place to nest and rear their young. It was created to offset, in part, losses of nesting habitat in the prairie wetland region of the Midwest. Arapaho NWR is one of over 550 refuges in the National Wildlife Refuge System - a network of lands set aside specifically for wildlife. Managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Refuge System is a living heritage, preserving wildlife and habitat for people today and for generations to come. The Refuge provides excellent habitat for a variety of wildlife. The irrigated meadows are ideal for nesting waterfowl and other species of birds. Riparian areas offer excellent habitat for moose, elk, and neotropical birds. Upland game birds, neotropical birds, and pronghorn can be seen on the sagebrush flats and knolls. Waterfowl Through the Year The first waterfowl arrive at Arapaho NWR when the ice vanishes from the lakes and wetlands in late March to mid-April. Peak waterfowl migration occurs in late May when 5,000 or more ducks can be present. Canada geese, once scarce in the North Park area, have been re-established here. They begin nesting on the Refuge in April. Duck nesting usually starts in late May and peaks in mid-June. The Refuge produces about 8,000 ducklings and 300-400 goslings each year. Fall migration reaches its height in late September or early October when up to 8,000 waterfowl may be on the Refuge. Pronghorn / USFWS Wildlife Observation Opportunities A self-guided auto tour route on the Refuge offers visitors great opportunities to observe wildlife. A corresponding auto tour route leaflet provides wildlife, habitat, and Refuge management information related to stops along the route. More information about Arapaho NWR and recreational activities can be found at the Refuge headquarters. May through October are the best months for observing birds on the Refuge and in the surrounding North Park area. Most mammals can be observed year-round. About this Checklist The following table lists 208 species of birds, 37 mammals, and 16 other vertebrates that have been observed on the Refuge. Species of birds which have been known to nest on the Refuge are preceded by a bullet (●). Common names for mammals, fish, reptiles, and amphibians are followed by a specific abundance code (see codes below). Seasons of Occurrence: Since most birds are migratory, their seasonal occurrence and relative abundance are coded as follows: Sp S F W Spring (March-May) Summer (June-August) Fall (September-November) Winter (December-February) Seasonal a abundant, occurring in large Abundance: numbers c common, certain to be seen in suitable habitat u uncommon, present but not certain to be seen o occasional, seen only a few times during the season r rare, seen at intervals of 2 to 5 years x accidental, vagrant, or out of normal range Common Bird Name Sp S F Ducks, Geese, and Swans Snow Goose ● Canada Goose c c Trumpeter Swan Tundra Swan Wood Duck r ● Gadwall c a ● American Wigeon c a ● Mallard c a ● Blue-winged Teal c c ● Cinnamon Teal c c ● Northern Shoveler c c ● Northern Pintail c c ● Green-winged Teal c c ● Canvasback u u ● Redhead c c ● Ring-necked Duck u o ● Lesser Scaup c a Bufflehead o r Common Goldeneye r r ● Common Merganser o u ● Ruddy Duck u c o c r r r a a a c c c c c u c u a o r u c Partridges, Grouse, Turkeys ● Greater Sage-Grouse u u u Grebes ● Pied-billed Grebe ● Eared Grebe Western Grebe Clark’s Grebe u u o r u u a c o r Cormorants Double-crested Cormorant o o o Pelicans American White Pelican u c u Ruddy duck USFWS W Swainson’s hawk Paul Kerris / USFWS u Bitterns, Herons, and Egrets American Bittern r ● Great Blue Heron u Snowy Egret r Cattle Egret o Green Heron ● Black-crowned Night-Heron u Yellow-crowned Night-Heron r o r u u o o o o r c u r Ibises and Spoonbills ● White Ibis u u u New World Vultures Turkey Vulture r u u Hawks, Kites, and Eagles Osprey r Bald Eagle o o o ● Northern Harrier u c c Sharp-shinned Hawk r o r Cooper’s Hawk o r Northern Goshawk o ● Swainson’s Hawk u c c ● Red-tailed Hawk c o o Ferruginous Hawk r o o Rough-legged Hawk o o Golden Eagle c u c Caracaras and Falcons ● American Kestrel Merlin Peregrine Falcon ● Prairie Falcon u r o o c o o o u o o o Rails, Gallinules, and Coots ● Virginia Rail ● Sora ● American Coot o u c u u a u u a r o r o c r Common Bird Name Sp S F Cranes Sandhill Crane o o Plovers Black-bellied Plover ● Killdeer r c c c Stilts and Avocets ● B

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