Anclote Key

Preserve State Park - Florida

Anclote Key Preserve State Park is located on Anclote Key three miles (5 km) off Tarpon Springs along the Atlantic coastal plain. This state park is only accessible by boat. Amenities include primitive camping on the northern portion of the island as well as picnic pavilions and grills. Wildlife includes the American oystercatcher, bald eagle and piping plover. The park is unique in that a lighthouse, built in 1887, is on the southern end of the key in Pinellas County, Florida. Three Rooker Island, south of Anclote and part of the preserve, remains an important Gulf Coast beach-nesting bird sanctuary.

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Brochure of Anclote Key Preserve State Park in Florida - Where nature meets serenity. Published by Florida State Parks.Anclote Key - Brochure

Brochure of Anclote Key Preserve State Park in Florida - Where nature meets serenity. Published by Florida State Parks.

Anclote Key PSP https://www.floridastateparks.org/Anclote-Key https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anclote_Key_Preserve_State_Park Anclote Key Preserve State Park is located on Anclote Key three miles (5 km) off Tarpon Springs along the Atlantic coastal plain. This state park is only accessible by boat. Amenities include primitive camping on the northern portion of the island as well as picnic pavilions and grills. Wildlife includes the American oystercatcher, bald eagle and piping plover. The park is unique in that a lighthouse, built in 1887, is on the southern end of the key in Pinellas County, Florida. Three Rooker Island, south of Anclote and part of the preserve, remains an important Gulf Coast beach-nesting bird sanctuary.
Florida State Parks Florida Department of Environmental Protection Division of Recreation and Parks History & Nature The islands that make up Anclote Key State Park are renowned for their diversity and number of nesting shorebirds. On the Three Rooker Island large numbers of shorebirds nest in the summer. Species include American oystercatchers, royal and least terns, black skimmers and snowy and Wilson’s plovers. The adjacent waters are also an important feeding area for long-legged wading birds. At night, between the months of May and October, green and loggerhead sea turtles crawl from the gulf waters and lay their eggs on the beach. The forest on Anclote Key is composed of a variety of trees such as slash pine, sea grape and cabbage palm. It provides important shelter and food for migrating birds and other wildlife such as gopher tortoises and box turtles. Much of the eastern portion of the island is a marine tidal swamp composed of red, black and white mangrove trees. They are salt tolerant and their roots and leaves create a sheltered nursery area for juvenile fish and invertebrates. Just offshore fishing is excellent in the seagrass beds where sheepshead, redfish and seatrout are some of the species frequently caught. The lighthouse at the island’s southern end served as a beacon to ships for many years. President Grover Cleveland declared the island a lighthouse reservation in 1886. The lighthouse was built and began operation on September 15, 1887. Today the lighthouse is maintained as a historic structure. Anclote Key Preserve State Park #1 Causeway Boulevard Dunedin, FL 34698 Phone: (727) 469-5942 FloridaStateParks.org • • • • • • • • • • Park Guidelines Southwest Florida Anclote Key Preserve State Park Where nature meets serenity Hours are 8 a.m. until sunset, 365 days a year. All plants, animals and park property are protected, including sand dollars and shellfish. Please honor areas of the beach that are closed for vital shorebird nesting/resting. Pets are permitted on North Anclote Bar. Pets must be kept on a leash no longer than 6 feet, well behaved at all times and must stay out of posted areas. A Florida fishing license may be required. Fireworks and hunting are prohibited. There is no fresh water available on the island. Please bring drinking water with you. There are no garbage receptacles on the islands. Please take all refuse off of the islands with you. Camping registrations can be made by calling the resident ranger (727) 638-4447. Florida’s state parks are committed to providing equal access to all facilities and programs. Should you need assistance to enable your participation, please contact the ranger station. Alternate format available upon request at any Florida state park. FLORIDA State Parks Created on 11/14 SM National Gold Medal Winner Florida State Parks - “America’s First Three-Time Winner” Real Fun in Welcome to Anclote Key Preserve State Park where nature meets serenity. Located three miles off the coast from Tarpon Springs, this state park is an island-lover’s paradise. Whether it’s an angler searching for seatrout or a family looking for some fun in the sun, Anclote Key is their destination. Anclote Key Preserve State Park is comprised of four islands – Anclote Key, North Anclote Bar, South Anclote Bar and Three Rooker Island. Rest and relaxation are two major pastimes at this park. Visitors can bring beach chairs, umbrellas and coolers to this coastal haven and relax for a day or two on a mini tropical retreat. These islands are prime spots for reeling in seatrout, tarpon and snook. A primitive camping area is located on the northern tip of Anclote Key. Visitors will find grills, picnic tables, a pavilion and a composting toilet. Please note that there are no garbage receptacles on the island. Visitors must take out what they bring in! Temperatures can soar in the hot Florida sun, so visitors should be sure to bring drinking water as there is no fresh water available on the island. This is a great place for bird watching. Binoculars enable a close-up view of eagles nesting in the pine trees and ospreys searching the water for fish. Wading birds such as egrets, herons and roseate spoonbills, fish in the seagrass beds and mudflats on the bay side of the islands creating vivid photo opportunities. ThreeRooker Island attracts great numbers of gulls, terns and black skimmers. Directions Anclote Key Preserve is located three miles off the coast of Tarpon Springs and is accessible only by boat.
Camping and Cabins Guide Florida State Parks FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks Welcome When the setting sun paints the evening sky, where will you make your bed? Florida’s state parks offer you a variety of overnight accommodations. At a Florida state park, the day’s work is play, a walk on the beach, a hike through the woods, a swim, a bike ride. All you need is a fishing rod, a kayak, a book and a friend. What do you want to see when the sun rises on the new day? Choose a wooded campsite within walking distance of white sandy beaches or camp along the banks of a quietly moving river. Bring your boat or canoe, or fishing tackle and a rod, for a relaxing time with family and friends. Explore nature on the hiking trails, while at the same time leaving stress of the busy world behind. Attend a festival, a reenactment or simply do nothing. We are committed to providing a variety of accessible amenities for all visitors at Florida state parks, including campgrounds and cabins. 2 FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks Family Camping Florida’s state parks offer more than 50 campgrounds statewide for tents, campers and RVs. Most campsites include water, electricity, a grill and picnic table. Centralized showers, restrooms and a dump station are also available. • One responsible person, 18 or older, must be present on each campsite or cabin. • Camping fees vary from park to park and include a maximum of eight people per site, not including children under 6 years old. • Check-in time is 3 p.m. Check-out time is 1 p.m. You are welcome to stay in the park through the end of the day. • Quiet time is from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. • Campsites are limited to two vehicles. Selected campsites may only allow one vehicle. FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks 3 Cabins From modern to rustic, state park cabins provide overnight accommodations in a variety of settings—near beaches, rivers and lakes or peaceful wooded communities. Cabin styles vary from fully equipped modern cabins to hand-hewn, lumber or palm-log retreats. Cabin amenities may include a kitchen, fireplace and screened porch, complete with rocking chairs and porch swings. • Cabins may be reserved for one night during the week, Monday–Thursday, or a minimum of two nights on weekends and holidays, Friday and Saturday, departing Sunday, or Saturday and Sunday, departing Monday. Some exceptions apply. • Cabins can accommodate either four or six visitors. • Check-in time is 4 p.m. Check-out time is 11 a.m. • Quiet time is from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. 4 FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks • Pets are not permitted in cabins or cabin areas. • Staff may assess cabin renters a damage fee if necessary to clean-up or repair any damage beyond ordinary cleaning, wear and tear. Fees may also be charged for lost/stolen items. Group, Primitive, Equestrian and Boat Many parks offer areas for youth and group camping. Backpackers may wish to hike to secluded areas for primitive camping. More than 15 state parks offer campsites and other amenities for equestrians and their horses. Owners of horses visiting state parks must provide proof of a negative Coggins test. Call the park to discuss availability, facilities, rules and fees. Five state parks provide boat slips with water and electricity. Boaters have access to the state park’s restrooms, showers, pump-outs and other amenities. Boaters can also anchor overnight at Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park and at John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park. FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks 5 Camping with Pets and Service Animals Pets are welcome at most Florida State Parks. Some campgrounds have designated sites for pets. All pets must be confined, leashed or otherwise under the physical control of a person at all times. Leashes may not exceed six feet in length. Pets must be well behaved. Owners must pick up after their pets and properly dispose of all pet droppings in trash receptacles. Pets are not permitted on beaches or playgrounds, or in bathing areas, cabins, park buildings or concession facilities. Individual parks may have specific areas prohibiting pets. Service animals in a working capacity are allowed in all public areas of state parks when accompanied by a visitor with a disability. Service animals should be harnessed, leashed or tethered unless such a device interferes with the service animal’s work or the visitor’s disability prevents the use of these devices. 6 FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks Reservations Campsite and cabin reservations may be made from one day to 11 months in advance by calling (800) 326-3521, (866) I CAMP FL or TDD (888) 433-0287 or by visiting FloridaStateParks.ReserveAmerica.com. Call the park directly to reserve group or primitive campsites. Prices per night: Campsites $16 to $42 Cabins $30 to $160 Visitors pay a reservation fee of $6.70 *Prices subject to change. A 50 percent discount on base campsite fees is available to Florida citizens who are 65 years old or older, or Florida c

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