Fakahatchee Strand

Preserve State Park - Florida

Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park is the largest state park in Florida and is home to a variety of plant and animal species that can be found nowhere else in the continental United States. The emphasis at Fakahatchee is on the preservation of its natural character. The park can be divided into four main use areas. These are the Big Cypress Bend Boardwalk, the East River, the Jones Grade lakes, and Janes Memorial Scenic Drive.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Big Cypress National Preserve (NPres) in Florida. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Big Cypress - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Big Cypress National Preserve (NPres) in Florida. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

brochures

Brochure of Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park in Florida. Published by Florida State Parks.Fakahatchee - Brochure

Brochure of Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park in Florida. Published by Florida State Parks.

Trail Map of Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park in Florida. Published by Florida State Parks.Fakahatchee - Trail Map

Trail Map of Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park in Florida. Published by Florida State Parks.

Map East River Paddle Trail in Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park in Florida. Published by Florida State Parks.Fakahatchee - East River Paddle Trail

Map East River Paddle Trail in Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park in Florida. Published by Florida State Parks.

Fakahatchee Strand PSP https://www.floridastateparks.org/park/fakahatchee-strand https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fakahatchee_Strand_Preserve_State_Park Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park is the largest state park in Florida and is home to a variety of plant and animal species that can be found nowhere else in the continental United States. The emphasis at Fakahatchee is on the preservation of its natural character. The park can be divided into four main use areas. These are the Big Cypress Bend Boardwalk, the East River, the Jones Grade lakes, and Janes Memorial Scenic Drive.
Florida State Parks Florida Department of Environmental Protection Division of Recreation and Parks History & Nature The Fakahatchee Strand is a forested swamp about 20 miles long and five miles wide where the underlying limestone has dissolved to form a shallow, seasonally-flooded depression with a canopy characterized by bald cypress, red maple and royal palm trees. Within Fakahatchee Strand, deeper channels called sloughs provide a protective environment for tropical plants that cannot survive South Florida’s extreme temperatures. The deeper sloughs flow through layers of organic soils where smaller trees form a rain forest-like mid canopy, sometimes laden with epiphytes, including bromeliads and orchids. The southern portion of the Preserve is composed of salt marshes and mangroves which border Fakahatchee Bay. During the rainy season, fresh water flows southward into the Gulf of Mexico, gradually mixing with the salt water of the Ten Thousand Islands, creating conditions for a highly productive estuarine ecosystem. The park’s wildlife is as diverse as its flora. Imperiled species such as the American crocodile and the West Indian manatee dwell in the mangrove lined waterways to the south, while wood storks, bald eagles, Florida black bears, Everglades mink and Florida panthers make their home elsewhere in the park. Human activity at the Fakahatchee Strand has been documented as far back as 2,500 years ago. Archaeologists have noted several sites indicating pre-Columbian Indian activities. From 1944-1954, a timber company harvested cypress from the Fakahatchee Strand. Approximately 192 miles of tram roads, built to haul cypress logs from the swamp, are overgrown with forest vegetation. Several are kept clear for access and hiking. Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park 137 Coastline Drive Copeland, FL 34137 (239) 695-4593 FloridaStateParks.org Southwest Florida Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park The world’s largest cypress/royal palm forest Park Guidelines • • • • • • • • • • Hours are 8 a.m. until sunset, 365 days a year. No entrance fee is required. All plants, animals and park property are protected. The collection, destruction or disturbance of plants, animals or park property is prohibited. Pets are permitted in designated areas only. Pets must be kept on a hand held leash no longer than 6 feet and well behaved at all times. Fireworks and hunting are prohibited. The use of ATV’s and other off road vehicles is prohibited. Become a volunteer and/or join Friends of Fakahatchee State Preserve. For information, visit www.friendsoffakahatchee.org or check with park staff. Florida’s state parks are committed to providing equal access to all facilities and programs. Should you need assistance to enable your participation, please contact the ranger station. Alternate format available upon request at any Florida state park. FLORIDA State Parks Created on 11/14 SM National Gold Medal Winner Florida State Parks - “America’s First Three-Time Winner” Real Fun in Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park encompasses much of Florida’s most spectacular swamp. More native orchid species grow in this 75,000-acre wilderness than in any other place on the continent. Visitors can experience Fakahatchee by hiking one of its numerous trails, strolling along a boardwalk or bicycling or birdwatching on the 11-mile park road. The emphasis at Fakahatchee Strand Preserve State Park is on the preservation of its natural character. In keeping with this goal, facilities and activities are limited. The park is a wilderness to enjoy and explore. Adventurous visitors can participate in a guided swamp walk and wade into the Fakahatchee Strand to see its tropical ferns and bromeliads. Those who don’t want to get their feet wet can hike along one of the many remnant logging tram roads which are high, dry and open year-round. The East and West Main Tram are excellent hiking choices. The less adventuresome can take a leisurely drive through the wilderness along Janes Scenic Drive. To spend an enjoyable morning or afternoon at the park, visit the Big Cypress Bend Boardwalk on U.S. 41, seven miles west of State Road 29. The boardwalk is approximately 2,500 feet long and ends at a swamp pond where a variety of plants and wildlife may be observed. Directions To Park Entrance: Take I-75 to exit 80/ State Road 29. Go 15 miles south. Take a right on Janes Scenic Drive. To Big Cypress Bend Boardwalk: Take I-75 to exit 80/State Road 29. Travel south for 18 miles to U.S. 41. Turn right and go seven miles.
Camping and Cabins Guide Florida State Parks FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks Welcome When the setting sun paints the evening sky, where will you make your bed? Florida’s state parks offer you a variety of overnight accommodations. At a Florida state park, the day’s work is play, a walk on the beach, a hike through the woods, a swim, a bike ride. All you need is a fishing rod, a kayak, a book and a friend. What do you want to see when the sun rises on the new day? Choose a wooded campsite within walking distance of white sandy beaches or camp along the banks of a quietly moving river. Bring your boat or canoe, or fishing tackle and a rod, for a relaxing time with family and friends. Explore nature on the hiking trails, while at the same time leaving stress of the busy world behind. Attend a festival, a reenactment or simply do nothing. We are committed to providing a variety of accessible amenities for all visitors at Florida state parks, including campgrounds and cabins. 2 FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks Family Camping Florida’s state parks offer more than 50 campgrounds statewide for tents, campers and RVs. Most campsites include water, electricity, a grill and picnic table. Centralized showers, restrooms and a dump station are also available. • One responsible person, 18 or older, must be present on each campsite or cabin. • Camping fees vary from park to park and include a maximum of eight people per site, not including children under 6 years old. • Check-in time is 3 p.m. Check-out time is 1 p.m. You are welcome to stay in the park through the end of the day. • Quiet time is from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. • Campsites are limited to two vehicles. Selected campsites may only allow one vehicle. FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks 3 Cabins From modern to rustic, state park cabins provide overnight accommodations in a variety of settings—near beaches, rivers and lakes or peaceful wooded communities. Cabin styles vary from fully equipped modern cabins to hand-hewn, lumber or palm-log retreats. Cabin amenities may include a kitchen, fireplace and screened porch, complete with rocking chairs and porch swings. • Cabins may be reserved for one night during the week, Monday–Thursday, or a minimum of two nights on weekends and holidays, Friday and Saturday, departing Sunday, or Saturday and Sunday, departing Monday. Some exceptions apply. • Cabins can accommodate either four or six visitors. • Check-in time is 4 p.m. Check-out time is 11 a.m. • Quiet time is from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. 4 FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks • Pets are not permitted in cabins or cabin areas. • Staff may assess cabin renters a damage fee if necessary to clean-up or repair any damage beyond ordinary cleaning, wear and tear. Fees may also be charged for lost/stolen items. Group, Primitive, Equestrian and Boat Many parks offer areas for youth and group camping. Backpackers may wish to hike to secluded areas for primitive camping. More than 15 state parks offer campsites and other amenities for equestrians and their horses. Owners of horses visiting state parks must provide proof of a negative Coggins test. Call the park to discuss availability, facilities, rules and fees. Five state parks provide boat slips with water and electricity. Boaters have access to the state park’s restrooms, showers, pump-outs and other amenities. Boaters can also anchor overnight at Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park and at John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park. FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks 5 Camping with Pets and Service Animals Pets are welcome at most Florida State Parks. Some campgrounds have designated sites for pets. All pets must be confined, leashed or otherwise under the physical control of a person at all times. Leashes may not exceed six feet in length. Pets must be well behaved. Owners must pick up after their pets and properly dispose of all pet droppings in trash receptacles. Pets are not permitted on beaches or playgrounds, or in bathing areas, cabins, park buildings or concession facilities. Individual parks may have specific areas prohibiting pets. Service animals in a working capacity are allowed in all public areas of state parks when accompanied by a visitor with a disability. Service animals should be harnessed, leashed or tethered unless such a device interferes with the service animal’s work or the visitor’s disability prevents the use of these devices. 6 FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks Reservations Campsite and cabin reservations may be made from one day to 11 months in advance by calling (800) 326-3521, (866) I CAMP FL or TDD (888) 433-0287 or by visiting FloridaStateParks.ReserveAmerica.com. Call the park directly to reserve group or primitive campsites. Prices per night: Campsites $16 to $42 Cabins $30 to $160 Visitors pay a reservation fee of $6.70 *Prices subject to change. A 50 percent discount on base campsite fees is available to Florida citizens who are 65 years old or older, or Florida c

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