Apalachicola

National Forest - Florida

The Apalachicola National Forest is located in the Florida Panhandle. The National Forest provides water and land-based outdoors activities such as off-road biking, hiking, swimming, boating, hunting, fishing, horse-back riding, and off-road ATV usage. Apalachicola National Forest contains two Wilderness Areas: Bradwell Bay Wilderness and Mud Swamp/New River Wilderness. There are also several special purpose areas: Camel Lake Recreation Area, Fort Gadsden Historical Site, Leon Sinks Geological Area, Silver Lake Recreation Area, Trout Pond Recreation Area, and Wright Lake Recreation Area. Local Forest ranger district offices are located in Bristol and Crawfordville.
Apalachicola NF https://www.fs.usda.gov/apalachicola https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apalachicola_National_Forest The Apalachicola National Forest is located in the Florida Panhandle. The National Forest provides water and land-based outdoors activities such as off-road biking, hiking, swimming, boating, hunting, fishing, horse-back riding, and off-road ATV usage. Apalachicola National Forest contains two Wilderness Areas: Bradwell Bay Wilderness and Mud Swamp/New River Wilderness. There are also several special purpose areas: Camel Lake Recreation Area, Fort Gadsden Historical Site, Leon Sinks Geological Area, Silver Lake Recreation Area, Trout Pond Recreation Area, and Wright Lake Recreation Area. Local Forest ranger district offices are located in Bristol and Crawfordville.
Apalachicola N at i on a l F o res t early 1.2 million acres in north and central Florida have been set aside by Congress as national forests. In the early 1900s, they were referred to as the lands that nobody wanted. The passage of the Weeks Act in 1911 authorized the federal purchase of privately forested or cut over lands to protect streams. As a result, three national forests were created in Florida – the Apalachicola, the Osceola and the Ocala. Today these forests are very popular with visitors. Modern-day national forests are managed for multiple uses, so people can recreate and enjoy the great outdoors while protection and care is given to the wildlife and natural resources of the forest. Camping, boating, wildlife viewing, hunting, fishing, scenic driving and trail riding are popular recreation activities on the Florida forests. Recreational trails are available for hiking, biking, horse riding, ATV riding and motorcycle riding. Recreation Guide D IC OU T A S A NO TR CE LE The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or a part of an individual’s income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. VE OOR ETH Florida 2010 Forest Recreation Guide R8-RG354 January 2010 CAMEL LAKE Recreation Area This natural retreat on the shores of Camel Lake has recreation opportunities for both day users and camping enthusiasts. It is located approximately 12 miles south of Bristol, off of State Highway 12, on Forest Road 105 in Liberty County. Campers can choose from one of ten campsites, some with lake views and electricity. The sites are enhanced with fire pits, picnic tables and grills. Both the camping and day use areas have bathhouses with showers, flush toilets and drinking water. In the heat of summer, visitors will appreciate the white sandy beach with a roped off swimming area, large picnic pavilion, fishing opportunities and primitive boat ramp for non-motorized access to the lake. Camel Lake is open year round from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (6 p.m. in winter). A volunteer host lives on-site. This is a fee area. N Service United States Department of Agriculture leON SINKS Geological Area Come to the fascinating world of sinkholes at Leon Sinks Geological Area, located on US 319 in southern Leon County. Sinkholes, swales, caverns, natural bridges, circular depressions and water table ponds all indicate karst. This term is applied to terrain that groundwater and rain have changed by dissolving underlying limestone bedrock. The power of raindrops can change the land dramatically. Visit Leon Sinks Geological Area and discover a new sinkhole or watch a soaring red shouldered hawk glide across a blue sky. Listen carefully for the mournful call of the yellow-billed cuckoo. It is commonly believed this bird call predicts the approach of bad weather. An emerald world of plants and trees greets you at Leon Sinks. The observation platform at Big Dismal Sink offers a breathtaking view of more than 75 different plants cascading down the sink’s steep walls. Allow time for a leisurely stroll in this unique, natural showcase that offers so many pleasant sights and sounds. For your personal safety and the preservation of the sinkhole walls, swimming is not allowed. Help maintain the beauty of Leon Sinks by packing out litter and staying outside of the sinkholes. A volunteer host lives on site. This is a day use area and fees are collected. THE APALACHICOLA NATIONAL FOREST Florida’s largest national forest, the Apalachicola, consists of 567,742 acres just southwest of Tallahassee. Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed the Apalachicola a national forest on May 13, 1936. Turpentining and timbering were major industries in the forest at this time. When the U.S. Forest Service acquired the land, most of the trees had been cut. Today the forest abounds with cypress, oak and magnolias in wet, lowland areas. Stands of slash and longleaf pines cover the sandhills and flatwoods. The Apalachicola’s rivers and streams provide a steady freshwater flow to some of the most productive coastal bays and estuaries known for shellfish and commercial seafood. The Apalachicola National Forest is also home to unique savannahs. Savannahs a

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