Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee

National Wildlife Refuge - Florida

The Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge is located west of Boynton Beach, in Palm Beach County, Florida. It includes the most northern remnant of the historic Everglades wetland ecosystem. The refuge contains one of three water conservation areas (WCAs) in south Florida and is maintained to provide water storage and flood control, as well as habitat for native fish and wildlife populations. Water is regulated by a series of pumps, canals, water control structures, and levees built by the Army Corps of Engineers. These freshwater storage areas and part of the Everglades National Park are all that remain of the original Everglades.

brochures

Brochure of Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee - Brochure

Brochure of Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Brochure of Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee - Brochure (Español)

Brochure of Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map of Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee - Map

Map of Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Birds of Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee - Birds

Birds of Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

American Alligators of Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee - American Alligator

American Alligators of Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Apple Snail Adoption Program at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee - Apple Snail Adoption Program

Apple Snail Adoption Program at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Fact Sheet for Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee - Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet for Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Fishing and Boating at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee - Fishing and Boating

Fishing and Boating at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Hunting at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee - Hunting

Hunting at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/ARM_loxahatchee/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loxahatchee_National_Wildlife_Refuge The Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge is located west of Boynton Beach, in Palm Beach County, Florida. It includes the most northern remnant of the historic Everglades wetland ecosystem. The refuge contains one of three water conservation areas (WCAs) in south Florida and is maintained to provide water storage and flood control, as well as habitat for native fish and wildlife populations. Water is regulated by a series of pumps, canals, water control structures, and levees built by the Army Corps of Engineers. These freshwater storage areas and part of the Everglades National Park are all that remain of the original Everglades.
Collecting The collecting or taking of plants, animals, and/or artifacts is prohibited. Fishing Sport fishing is allowed in designated areas in accordance with current Federal, State, and Refuge regulations except where posted as closed. Wildlife Feeding or disturbing alligators and all other wildlife is prohibited. Use of spotlights or other artificial light to locate wildlife is prohibited. Releasing wild or domestic animals or plants is prohibited. Trails Hiking, bicycling, and horseback riding are allowed on designated trails and roads. Pets Pets are allowed only in designated areas. This regulation does not apply to official service animals. Only two pets per person are allowed. They must be confined or leashed with no longer than a six foot leash. Pet owners must properly dispose of pet’s waste. Boating Only vessels with water-cooled outboard engines and non-motorized vessels are allowed. Obey refuge speed limits of 35 mph and no wake zones of 500 feet around each boat ramp and in the entire crossover canal from the L-7 canal to the L-40 canal at the 20-Mile Bend boat ramp. All vessels are required to fly a 10” x 12” orange flag 10 feet above the vessel waterline so that others may see you. Aircraft The use of unmanned aircraft including drones is prohibited. Firearms Persons possessing firearms must comply with all Federal and State laws. Top to bottom: Ibis in sunset, USFWS/Bradley Rosendorf; red-shouldered hawk and cypress swamp sunset, both USFWS/Veronica Kelly. Hunting Hunting is allowed in accordance with current Federal, State and Refuge regulations. All hunters are required to carry a signed General Hunt Permit, which can be found in the refuge’s hunting brochure. Water Sports Swimming, water skiing, scuba diving, or snorkeling is prohibited. Vehicles and Speed Limits The speed limit on all refuge roads is 15 mph unless otherwise posted. Vehicles are not allowed on levees or trails. Unregistered vehicles are prohibited. Cover photo: American alligator, USFWS/Veronica Kelly Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge 10216 Lee Road, Boynton Beach, FL 33473 Visitor Center 561/734 8303 Administrative Office 561/732 3684 http://www.fws.gov/refuge/arm_loxahatchee/ http://www.facebook.com/armloxahatcheenwr U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1 800/344 WILD http://www.fws.gov Hearing impaired persons may contact the refuge through the federal relay number at 1-800/877 8339. May 2020 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. photographs. Every winter the refuge is host to an amateur photography contest where photographs are displayed at the refuge visitor center. Please contact the visitor center for more information. Trails Almost 50 miles of trails meander along swamps, wetlands, and canals. Take a stroll through the cypress swamp on the accessible 0.4-mile Cypress Swamp Boardwalk. Experience the wildlife on foot or bike along three miles of flat, grassy trails within the wetlands of the C-Impoundments. North of Lee Road, visitors can walk or bike almost five miles of gravel trails next to wetlands, canals, and cypress swamp habitat in the A-Impoundments. Hiking, bicycling, pet walking, and horseback riding are welcome on the 36 miles of trails on the perimeter levee. These trails are flat, packed gravel; we recommend a mountain or hybrid bike for all trails open to biking. National Wildlife Refuge System Established in 1903 by President Theodore Roosevelt, the National Wildlife Refuge System now consists of more than 560 refuges and more than 850 million acres of land and water across all 50 states and five U.S. territories. Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge Welcome to the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge consists of 145,188 acres, or 226 square miles, of Everglades ecosystems including a mosaic of wet prairies, sawgrass ridges, sloughs, tree islands, cattail communities, and a 400-acre cypress swamp that provides habitat — food, water, shelter, and space — for various wildlife species. More than 250 species of birds, 60 species of reptiles and amphibians, 40 species of butterflies, and 20 types of mammals are found on the refuge. The refuge also provides habitat and protection for endangered and threatened wildlife such as the American alligator, snail kite, and wood stork. Migratory birds such as Neotropical songbirds, secretive marsh birds, shorebirds, raptors, and waterfowl winter at the refuge along with a great variety of year-round resident wading birds and other wildlife. Through refuge programs and facilities, visitors can enjoy a variety of educational and wildlifeoriented recreational opportunities such as guided birdwatching and interpretive wildlife tours. Hunting H
de autopago o en el centro de visitantes de 9 am a 4 pm todos los días. Coleccionar Se prohíbe la recolección o toma de plantas, animales y / o artefactos. Fauna silvestre Se prohíbe alimentar o molestar a los caimánes y toda otra vida silvestre. Se prohíbe el uso de focos u otra luz artificial para localizar la vida silvestre. Se prohíbe la liberación de animales o plantas silvestres o domésticas. Pescar La pesca deportiva está permitida en áreas designadas de acuerdo con las regulaciones federales, estatales y del refugio actuales, excepto donde se publique como cerrado. Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge 10216 Lee Road, Boynton Beach, FL 33473 Centro de Visitantes 561/734 8303 Oficina Administrativa 561/732 3684 http://www.fws.gov/refuge/arm_loxahatchee/ http://www.facebook.com/armloxahatcheenwr Caminos Senderismo, ciclismo, y montar a caballo está permitido en los senderos y caminos designados. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1 800/344 WILD http://www.fws.gov Paseo en bote Solo se permiten embarcaciones con motores fueraborda refrigerados por agua y embarcaciones no motorizadas. Obedezca los límites de velocidad del refugio de 35 mph y zonas de no estela de 500 pies alrededor de cada rampa para botes y en todo el canal cruzado desde el canal L-7 hasta el canal L-40 en la rampa para botes de 20 Mile Bend. Se requiere que todas las embarcaciones izan una bandera anaranjada de 10 “x 12” 10 pies sobre la línea de flotación de la embarcación para que otros puedan verlo. Las personas con discapacidad auditiva pueden comunicarse con el refugio a través del número 1-800/877 8339. Mascotas Se admiten mascotas solo en áreas designadas. Aeronave Este reglamento Se prohíbe el uso de aeronaves no se aplica a no tripuladas, incluidos los los animales de drones. servicio oficial. Armas de fuego Solo se permiten Las personas que poseen armas dos mascotas por de fuego deben cumplir con todas persona. Deben las leyes federales y estatales. ser confinados o amarrados con Deportes acuáticos una correa de no Está prohibido nadar, esquiar en De arriba a abajo: Ibis en el atardecer, USFWS/Bradley Rosendorf; más de seis pies. el agua, submarinar (snorkeling) Aguililla Pecho Rojo y Ciprés al atardecer, ambos USFWS/Veronica Kelly Los dueños de o bucear. mascotas deben eliminar adecuadamente los desechos de las mascotas. Vehículos y límites de velocidad El límite de velocidad en todas las carreteras del refugio Caza es de 15 mph a menos que se indique lo contrario. No se La caza está permitida de acuerdo con las regulaciones permiten vehículos en diques o senderos. Los vehículos no federales, estatales y del refugio actuales. Todos los registrados están prohibidos. cazadores deben llevar un permiso de caza general firmado, que se puede encontrar en el folleto de caza del refugio. Foto de portada: Caimán americano, USFWS/Veronica Kelly julio 2020 Servicio de Pesca y Vida Silvestre de EE.UU. Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee Refugio Nacional de Vida Silvestre tomar fotografías. Cada invierno, el refugio es el anfitrión de un concurso de fotografía amateur donde se muestran fotografías en el centro de visitantes. Por favor, póngase en contacto con el centro de visitantes para más información. El Sistema Nacional de Refugios de Vida Silvestre Establecido en 1903 por el presidente Theodore Roosevelt, el Sistema Nacional de Refugios de Vida Silvestre ahora consiste de más de 560 refugios y más de 850 millones de acres de tierra y agua en los 50 estados y cinco territorios de EE. UU. Senderismo y Ciclismo Casi 50 millas de senderos serpentean a lo largo de pantanos, humedales y canales. Dé un paseo por el pantano de cipreses en el sendero de madera de 0.4 millas accesible para discapacitados. Experimente la vida silvestre a pie o en bicicleta a lo largo de tres millas de senderos planos y cubiertos de césped dentro de los humedales de los Embalses-C. Al norte de Lee Road, los visitantes pueden caminar o andar en bicicleta por casi cinco millas de senderos de grava junto a humedales, canales y hábitats de cipreses en los Embalses-A. Senderismo, ciclismo, caminar con mascotas y montar a caballo son bienvenidos en las 36 millas de senderos en el dique perimetral. Estos senderos son de grava plana y compacta; Recomendamos una bicicleta de montaña o híbrida para todos los senderos abiertos al ciclismo. Refugio Nacional de Vida Silvestre Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee Bienvenido al Refugio Nacional de Vida Silvestre Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee. El refugio consiste de 145,188 acres, o 226 millas cuadradas, de ecosistemas de los Everglades que incluyen un mosaico de praderas húmedas, praderas de juncias, cenagales, islas arbóreas, comunidades de totora y un pantano de cipreses de 400 acres que proporciona hábitat: alimento, agua, refugio, y espacio - para varias especies de vida silvestre. Más de 250 especies de aves, 60 especies de reptiles y anfibios, 40 especies de mariposas y 20 tipos de mamíferos se encue
U. S.Fish &Wild lif eServic e Arth ur R .Marsh allLoxah atc h eeNationalWild lif eR ef ug e To BelleGlad e ( 21m iles) Southern Boulevard STA-1E 20Mile Bend Area Wellington US 441 / SR 7 STA-1W To West Palm Beac h ( 11m iles) Hillsboro Area t her nB l vd AI m pound m ents Glades Rd ee R d To Ft.Laud erd ale ( 23m iles) W Hillsboro Blvd 20MileBend Area Open to Non-motorized Watercraft 0 1 2 Miles To LeeR d ( 3. 5m iles) Hillsboro Area na lS t S ou 5 Miles e ve Le 40 L- Atlantic Ave Lo x a ha tc h 2. 5 Map Loc ation Lantana Rd Lee Rd N26°27. 130’ 0 Forest Hill Blvd Head quarters Area Boynton Beach Blvd Head quarters Area WCA-2 Straz zulla ee Lev 40 L- Strazzulla To G362 ( 3. 5m iles) E Ca 20 Mile Bend Boat Ramp Rd CanoeTrail ( 5. 5m iles) e ve e L 40 L- 0 0. 15 0. 3 Miles L7 Le ve e L39L eve e WCA-2 0 L o xa 0. 25 To U h ee S 44 Rd 1 ( 6. 5 mile 0. 5 s) Miles Head quarters Closed Area Parking Open to Nonm otorized Waterc raf t No Waterc raf t Paved R oad s Hiking ,Bic yc ling ,Equestrian,and Pet Walking Trails Perim eter Canal CanoeTrail Cypress Swam p Board walkTrail Lee Rd C2E Marsh Trail C2W C7 L Boat R am p I Fish ing Area FeeArea C9 A Wild lif eViewing C5 0 Marsh Trail Sh elter C6 Pavilion C8 L Pad d ling Area R estroom To US 441/SR 7 C1 LeeR oad Boat R am p L40Levee Hiking and Bic yc ling Trails Canoeand KayakR ental hat c R ef ug eBound ary Open to Motorized and Nonm otorized Waterc raf t BI m pound m ent Head quarters Area CI m pound m ents C10 0. 25 0. 5 Miles
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge Bird List Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge includes 143,874 acres of Everglades habitat in Palm Beach County, Florida. Tree islands interspersed with stands of sawgrass, wet prairies and sloughs cover most of the refuge. The headquarters entrance, located 12 miles west of Boynton Beach, has a combined management and wildlife viewing area that is an excellent vantage point for watching waders, waterfowl and other birds. The Marsh Trail is located here. The Cypress Swamp Boardwalk offers an opportunity to see woodpeckers, owls, and songbirds. The 5.5 mile canoe trail provides a closer look at the Everglades and its wildlife. For further information contact the Visitor Center at 561/734 8303. How to use your checklist The bird checklist was designed to be informative and simple to use. The list is arranged in the order established by the American Ornithological Union. Symbols which appear in this checklist represent the following: photo: USFWS Seasonal Appearance W Winter••• December - February Sp Spring•••March - May S Summer•••June - August F Fall•••September - November Seasonal abundance a. abundant (a common species which is very numerous) photo: Peter Knapp c. common (certain to be seen in suitable habitat) u. uncommon (present but not certain to be seen) o. occasional (seen only a few times during a season) r. rare (seen at intervals of 2 to 5 years) x accidental (out of normal species range) * nests on the refuge. photo: K. Kettlehut This checklist includes 250 species of birds and is based on observations by refuge personnel and local bird authorities. If you should find an unlisted species, please let us know at Refuge Headquarters. We appreciate your help in updating our records. Photo:Willocks Loons and Grebes ___Common Loon ___Pied-billed Grebe* ___Horned Grebe ___Eared Grebe Pelicans and Their Allies ___American White Pelican ___Brown Pelican ___Double-crested Cormorant* ___Anhinga* ___Magnificent Frigatebird W Sp S F r r c c u c x x r r u u u a a a x u a x Herons, Egrets, and Bitterns ___American Bittern ___Least Bittern* ___Great Blue Heron* ___Great Egret* ___Snowy Egret* ___Little Blue Heron* ___Tricolored Heron* ___Cattle Egret* ___Green Heron* ___Black-crowned Night-Heron* ___Yellow-crowned Night-Heron* u u a a c a c a a c u u u a a c a c a a c u o u a a u a c a a c u u u a a c a c a a c u Ibises, Spoonbills, and Storks ___White Ibis* ___Scarlet Ibis ___Glossy Ibis ___Roseate Spoonbill ___Wood Stork* c x c o c c c c u o c u o u c o c Waterfowl ___Fulvous Whistling-Duck ___Tundra Swan ___Snow Goose ___Wood Duck* ___Green-winged Teal ___American Black Duck ___Mottled Duck* ___Mallard ___White-cheeked Pintail ___Northern Pintail ___Blue-winged Teal ___Cinnamon Teal ___Northern Shoveler ___Gadwell ___American Wigeon ___Canvasback ___Redhead ___Ring-necked Duck c x x c c r a r x u a x u o u r r a u u c u u c c a a r o u a r u u o u r r a r a r u o ___Greater Scaup ___Lesser Scaup ___Common Goldeneye ___Bufflehead ___Hooded Merganser ___Common Merganser ___Red-breasted Merganser ___Ruddy Duck ___Masked Duck W r o x r u x o o x Vultures, Hawks, Falcons, and Allies ___Black Vulture* ___Turkey Vulture* ___Osprey* ___Swallow-tailed Kite ___White-tailed Kite ___Snail Kite* ___Bald Eagle ___Northern Harrier ___Sharp-shinned Hawk ___Cooper’s Hawk ___Red-shouldered Hawk* ___Broad-winged Hawk ___Short-tailed Hawk ___Swainson’s Hawk ___Red-tailed Hawk ___Crested Caracara ___American Kestrel ___Merlin ___Peregine Falcon a a c a a c c c c u r u u u o o r c c c c o o o a a a o o u u u c c u u r r a a c r Turkeys and Quail ___Wild Turkey ___Northern Bobwhite u u u x u Rails, Gallinules, Coots, and Cranes ___Yellow Rail ___Black Rail ___King Rail* ___Virginia Rail ___Sora ___Purple Gallinule* ___Common Moorhean* ___American Coot* ___Limpkin* ___Sandhill Crane ___Whooping Crane r r c o u c a a c u r c c o u c c a a a r c c u u r r r r c o u c a a c u r u u c c u u c c Shorebirds ___Black-bellied Plover ___Semipalmated Plover ___Killdeer* ___Black-necked Stilt* u r c Sp r r o r S r F o r u o o x o u c c u o c o a o o x u x c u r ___American Avocet ___Greater Yellowlegs ___Lesser Yellowlegs ___Solitary Sandpiper ___Willet ___Spotted Sandpiper ___Marbled Godwit ___Red Knot ___Semipalmated Sandpiper ___Western Sandpiper ___Least Sandpiper ___White-rumped Sandpiper ___Pectoral Sandpiper ___Dunlin ___Stilt Sandpiper ___Short-billed Dowitcher ___Long-billed Dowitcher ___Common Snipe ___American Woodcock W Sp S o u c u u c u r u u r u c o c c u c c u a c u u u u o u o u c c r F o c c u r c x x c c a r u r u c u c r Gulls and Terns ___Laughing Gull ___Bonaparte’s Gull ___Ring-billed Gull ___Herring Gull ___Gull-billed T
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service American Alligator Alligator mississippiensis A member of the crocodile family, the American alligator is a living fossil from the Age of Reptiles, having survived on earth for 200 million years. John Hammond, USFWS American alligator populations reached all-time lows in the 1950s, primarily due to market- hunting and habitat loss. However, in 1987, the alligator was pronounced fully recovered, making it one of the first endangered species success stories. Today, alligators are found throughout the Southeast, from the Carolinas to Texas and north to Arkansas. Description and Diet The alligator can be distinguished from the crocodile by its head shape and color. The crocodile has a narrower snout, and unlike the alligator, has lower jaw teeth that are visible even when its mouth is shut. In addition, adult alligators are black, while crocodiles are brownish in color. The alligator has a large, slightly rounded body, with thick limbs, a broad head, and a very powerful tail that it uses to propel itself through water. The tail accounts for half the alligator’s length. While alligators move very quickly in water, they are generally slow-moving on land, although they can be quick for short distances. Alligators will eat just about anything, but primarily consume fish, turtles, and snails. Small animals that come to the water’s edge to drink make easy prey. Young alligators mostly feed on insects, crustaceans, snails, and fish. Biological Role As during the Reptile Age, alligators live in wetlands, vital habitat that holds the key to their continued American Alligator survival. Alligators depend on wetlands—and in some ways wetlands depend on them. As predators at the top of the food chain, they help control numbers of rodents and other animals that might overtax the marshland vegetation. The alligator’s greatest value to the marsh and other animals within it are the “gator holes” that many adults create and expand through the years. An alligator uses its mouth and claws to uproot vegetation to clear out a space; then, shoving with its body and slashing with its powerful tail, it wallows out a depression that stays full of water in the wet season and holds water after the rains stop. During the dry season, and particularly during extended droughts, gator holes provide vital water for fish, insects, crustaceans, snakes, turtles, birds, and other animals in addition to the alligator itself. Sometimes, the alligator may expand its gator hole by digging beneath an overhanging bank to create a hidden den. After tunneling as far as 20 feet, it enlarges the end, making a chamber with a ceiling high enough above water level to permit breathing. This is not the alligator’s nest but merely a place for the reptile to survive the dry season and winter. Breeding and Life History The breeding season begins in the spring. Although alligators have no vocal cords, males bellow loudly to attract mates and warn off other males during this time by sucking air into their lungs and blowing it out in intermittent, deep-toned roars. The female builds a nest of vegetation, sticks, leaves, and mud in a sheltered spot in or near the water. After she lays 20 to 50 white, goose-egg sized eggs, she covers them under more vegetation, which, like mulch, heats as it decays, helping to keep the eggs warm. She remains near the nest throughout the 65day incubation period, protecting the nestJanuary from intruders. When the 1998 John Hammond, USFWS young begin to hatch, they emit a high-pitched croaking noise, and the female quickly digs them out. The young, tiny replicas of adult alligators with a series of yellow bands around their bodies, then find their way to water. For several days they continue to live on yolk masses within their bellies. A combined effort by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and State wildlife agencies in the South saved these unique animals. The Endangered Species Act prohibited alligator hunting, allowing the species to rebound in numbers in many areas where it had been depleted. As it began to make a comeback, States established alligator monitoring programs and used the information to ensure that numbers continued to increase. In 1987, the Fish and Wildlife Service pronounced the American alligator fully recovered and consequently removed the animal from the list of endangered species. Alligators reach breeding maturity between the ages of 8 and 13 years, at which time they are about 6 to 7 feet long. From then on, growth continues at a slower rate. Old males may grow to be 14 feet long and weigh up to 1,000 pounds during a lifespan of 30 years or more. The story of the American alligator is one of both drastic decline and complete recovery. A story of State and Federal cooperation, it is truly one of the prominent successes of the Nation’s endangered species program. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Program 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Room 420 Arlington, VA 22203
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Apple Snail Adoption Program (ASAP) Urban Wildlife Refuge Partnership West Palm Beach, Florida Partners Lisa Morse Partners include, Pine Jog Environmental Education Center in the College of Education of Florida Atlantic University, Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, Grassy Waters Everglades Preserve, local schools, Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department, and the Institute for Regional Conservation. (a) Pine Jog Resident Scientist w/Student Florida Atlantic University’s (FAU) Pine Jog Environmental Education Center will implement the Apple Snail Adoption Program (ASAP) with at least 500 students and 40 teachers and community representatives in South Florida. ASAP will focus on propagating and restoring native Florida Apple Snail populations and the removal of invasive exotic snails in two locations: the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (ARMLNWR) and the Grassy Waters Everglades Preserve. Students will also learn to identify and remove invasive plant material. ASAP will create lessons to engage students in their classes, raise Florida Apple Snails in the classroom and provide field learning experiences centered on wetland restoration activities in the designated wetland areas. This partnership will promote environmental stewardship, conservation, restoration and education targeting the following outcomes: • The creation of a set of 7 lesson plans based on the Florida Apple Snail to explore the consequences of introducing invasive and exotic species into natural systems, the interconnectedness of all living things and the importance of protecting natural (b) Apple Snail Hatching resources, especially fresh water. These lesson plans will also introduce the understanding of the food chain and food webs and the impact of anthropogenic activities on them, the intrinsic rewards of giving back to nature as opposed to taking from nature, and the introduction of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) associated with restoration science to younger students, particularly urban youth from historically underserved populations. • The restoration of wetlands designed to enhance water quality, remove invasive species and support native Florida Apple Snail populations. • The propagation of Florida Apple Snails in local classrooms throughout South Florida. • Quality field experiences to release snails, restore wetlands, assist in water sampling, and participate in species population counts (i.e. Bird Counts). • Within 5 years, expand the ASAP program For more information, contact: National Wildlife Refuge System U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service 5275 Leesburg Pike Falls Church, VA 22041-3803 www.fws.gov/urban to 10 Florida counties involving at least 5,000 students and 40 teachers. PA R T N E R S H I P September 2016
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service A.R.M. Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge photo: USFWS Refuge Facts ■ Established: 1951. ■ Acres: 143,954. Refuge Objectives ■ Restore and conserve the natural diversity, abundance and ecological function of the refuge. ■ Located in Palm Beach County, FL. ■ ■ Location: the refuge is located on US 441/SR7 between Boynton Beach Boulevard and Atlantic Avenue, approximately 6 miles west of Boynton Beach, FL. Conserve natural and cultural resources through partnerships and protection. ■ Develop appropriate and compatible wildlife-dependent recreation and environmental education programs. ■ Continue a partnership with the South Florida Water Management District. photo: USFWS photo: M. D. Maffei ■ Natural History ■ Refuge occupies the last of the northern Everglades. ■ photo: R. Hirschboeck Nearly 50,000 acres infested with invasive exotic plants such as melaleuca and Old World climbing fern. ■ Other management concerns include water quality, quantity, timing, and distribution. ■ Concentrations of migratory waterfowl, migratory passerines, wood storks, wading birds. ■ ■ Rolf Olson, Project Leader ARM Loxahatchee NWR 10216 Lee Road Boynton Beach, FL 33473 Phone: 561/732 3684 Fax: 561/369 7190 E-mail: FW4RWLoxahatchee@fws.gov Administers Hobe Sound NWR. ■ Rookeries present include great blue heron, anhinga, white ibis, little blue heron, tricolored heron, black-crowned night-heron, great egrets, cattle egret, snowy egrets. ■ Prescribed fire. ■ Mechanical/chemical/biological control of exotic pest plants. ■ Education/interpretation. ■ Law enforcement. Public Use Opportunities ■ Nature trails. ■ Environmental education. ■ Visitor center. ■ Observation tower. ■ Observation platform. ■ Wildlife observation. ■ Photography. ■ Everglades canoe trail. ■ Fishing. ■ Waterfowl hunting, including youth hunt. Cattail............................10,139 acres ■ Alligator hunting. Cypress swamp.................400 acres ■ Bicycling. Composed of typical Everglades habitat including wet prairies, sloughs, sawgrass, tree islands. Impoundments...............2,150 acres Wet prairies...................53,453 acres Sloughs............................1,448 acres Sawgrass.......................40,074 acres Tree island.....................36,210 acres Financial Impact on Refuge ■ 25 person staff. ■ Management Tools ■ Water management for snail kite and wading bird rookeries. 300,000 visitors annually. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Calendar of Events February: Everglades Day. June: National Fishing Week. August-October: Alligator hunting. October: National Wildlife Refuge Week. November-January: Waterfowl hunting. Year-round: Calendar of events activities. Questions and Answers Where are the airboat rides? We have no airboat rides on the refuge. Airboats have been determined to be an incompatible use of the refuge. Airboat rides are by private enterprise and are available in adjacent Water Conservation Area #2. Who was Arthur R. Marshall? Art Marshall, a former Fish and Wildlife Service employee, was a biologist and conservationist who worked tirelessly for Everglades restoration. His work led to the formation of the Save the Everglades program, and in 1985, the Florida Wildlife Federation named him Conservationist of the Decade. The refuge was renamed in his honor, from Loxahatchee NWR to A.R.M. Loxahatchee NWR, in 1986. What is the fruit on the tree near the back door of the visitor center that looks like an apple? Is it edible? The tree is called the Pond Apple Tree. The fruit is called the Pond Apple, or the old timers used to call it alligator pear. It is edible, but quite cottony and not very tasty. It’s very attractive to wildlife. Where are the alligators? Alligators are most likely found along the Marsh Trail in open waters. Smaller alligators can usually be found in the ponds behind the Visitor Center. Many larger alligators can be found at the boat ramp and fishing pier. The refuge has the greatest density of alligators south of Lake Okeechobee. What is the “red stuff ” on the trees? The “red stuff ” on the bark of the trees is called lichen. This is a primitive plant that has a symbiotic relationship between an algae and a fungus. This particular lichen is called Baton Rouge, or Red Stick. What are the nobby protrusions sticking up out of the water? Are they young or small cypress trees? Those knobs are called cypress knees. They are an extension of the root system and their function is still being debated. Some say it helps support the tree as it has a shallow root system. These protrusions tend to stabilize the tree during storms. The second theory is that they provide a gaseous exchange for the roots which are covered with water. The third theory, and most recent, is that the tree stores starch in the knees.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee USFWS National Wildlife Refuge Fishing and Boating Regulations The Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge consists of three designated entrance areas: Headquarters, Hillsboro, and 20Mile Bend Areas. The main refuge access point is located at 10216 Lee Road between Boynton Beach Blvd. and Atlantic Ave. off of U.S. 441. Loxahatchee NWR provides wildlife dependent public uses such as hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, environmental education, and interpretation. However, the primary objective of a national wildlife refuge is to provide habitat for the conservation of all species of wildlife. Sport fishing is permitted at a level that does not adversely affect wildlife or their environment. Fishing provides recreational opportunities and permits the use of a valuable renewable resource. Refuge Specific Fishing and Boating Regulations for the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge Sport fishing and boating will be in accordance with all applicable Federal, State and Refuge specific regulations. Fishing regulations are designed to protect the fisherman and wildlife populations. Fishing and boating activities on the Refuge are listed within this brochure. The regulations within this brochure supplement the general regulations that govern fishing and boating on National Wildlife Refuges as set forth in Title 50 Code of Federal Regulations; Sections 27 and 32. (http://www.gpoaccess.gov/ecfr). Mercury health hazards Mercury is a naturally occurring element in the environment. However, unnaturally large quantities occur in the environment primarily from power generation and industrial pollution. Rain washes it into the waterways where it settles and is eaten by microorganisms, which are in turn eaten by fish. Because mercury levels build up in fish, the older fish, and those that eat other fish (such as bass and pickerel) have the highest mercury levels. For these species, it is recommended that people eat fish 12 inches or less in length. Mercury is very hazardous for humans and eating fish contaminated with mercury can result in serious health problems, including heart disease and damage to the brain and nervous system. Small amounts of mercury can damage a brain starting to form or grow. Therefore babies in the womb, nursing babies, and young children are at most risk. For more information about the levels in the various types of fish and who and what you can safely eat, see the FDA food safety website at www.cfsan.fda.gov/~frf/seamehg.html or the EPA website at www.epa.gov/ost/fish Access and Hours The refuge is open daily from 5:00 am to 10:00 pm. There are three entrances to the Refuge. The Headquarters Area (10216 Lee Road in Boynton Beach), the Hillsboro Area (west end of Loxahatchee Road in Boca Raton), and the 20-Mile Bend Area (off of Southern Blvd, SR-80 in West Palm Beach). Anglers and boaters are welcome to use all authorized entrances Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge is a federal entrance fee area. An entrance fee per vehicle or per pedestrian is required for daily visits. Entrance passes and Federal Duck Stamps are available upon request at the Refuge headquarters entrance station located off US 441/SR 7 in Boynton Beach. Freshwater fish at Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge Freshwater native species found on the Refuge include but are not limited to: largemouth bass, channel catfish, black crappie, redear sunfish, chain pickerel, longnose gar, bluegill, and warmouth. Possession limits Refer to State regulations. Exotic species found in South Florida Mayan Cichlid, Butterfly Peacock bass, Oscar, Spotted Tilapia, and Sailfin Catfish, etc. Alligators and other wildlife Alligators when fed lose their natural fear of humans and become attracted to people. Alligators that have been fed may be more likely to attack, and must be destroyed. It is unlawful to feed alligators or any other wildlife on the Refuge. This includes allowing alligators to eat unwanted or released fish. Native Fresh Water Fishes Black Crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) Longnose Gar (Lepisosteus osseus) Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) Warmouth (Lepomis gulosus) Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) Chain Pickerel (Esox niger) Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) Redear Sunfish (Lepomis microlophus) Exotic Freshwater Fishes Mayan Cichlid (Cichlasoma urophthalmus) Butterfly Peacock (Cichla ocellaris) Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus) Spotted Tilapia (Tilapia mariae) Sailfin Catfish (Pterygoplichthys multiradiatus) Requirements and Regulations All recreational anglers must possess a valid Florida fishing license in accordance with the laws of the state of Florida. Daily bag and possession limits are in accordance with Florida regulations. To review additional information, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission recreational Fishing Regulations may be fo
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge Hunting Regulations 2020–2021 Welcome Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1951, and is home to the northernmost section of the Everglades in Palm Beach County, Florida. Public hunting is permitted on approximately 140,705 acres during specific times of the year. Permits You must possess and carry a signed refuge hunt permit (signed brochure) while hunting. You must have on your person at all times all applicable licenses, permits, and/or CITES tags. Entrance Fee An entrance pass is required. A current signed Federal Migratory Bird Hunting Conservation Stamp (Duck Stamp) covers entrance fees to all national wildlife refuges. Passes may be obtained at the self-pay stations, seasonally at the fee booths, or at the visitor center from 9 am – 4 pm daily. Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee NWR U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 10216 Lee Road, Boynton Beach, FL 33473 561/732 3684 https://www.fws.gov/refuge/ARM_Loxahatchee/ Firearms Persons possessing, transporting, or carrying firearms on National Wildlife Refuge System lands must comply with all provisions of Federal and State law. Persons may only use (discharge) firearms in accordance with refuge regulations (50 CFR 27.42 and specific refuge regulations in 50 CFR Part 32). Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8 am – 4:30 pm with the exception of Thanksgiving and Christmas July 2020 This brochure contains special regulations that supplement Federal and State laws with Title 50, Code of Federal Regulations. These refuge specific regulations are in place to protect our natural resources while providing a rewarding outdoor experience. These refuge specific regulations may be more restrictive than, and supersede State law. Careful adherence to these regulations and due respect for others will ensure the future of hunting on Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. Commercial Guided Hunting Commercial hunting guide operations within the refuge are regulated and managed through issuance of a Special Use Permit and special conditions. This activity provides recreational opportunities for hunters who desire a successful, quality experience, but who may lack the necessary equipment, skills, or knowledge to hunt within the environment of the refuge. Boating Regulations • There is a 35 mph speed limit in all waters of the refuge. A 500-foot (150-meter) Idle Speed Zone is at each of the refuge’s three boat ramps. • Motorized vessels are permitted in the Motorized Zone, south of latitude line N 26° 27.130’, and Perimeter Canal. Non-motorized vessels are permitted throughout the Refuge Interior. • All boats operating in the Refuge Interior, outside of the Perimeter Canal, are required to display a 10-inches by 12-inches (25 cm x 30 cm) orange flag 10-feet (3 meters) above the vessel’s waterline. This is a unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System, a network of lands and waters managed for the benefit of wildlife and people. • Hunters may only use boats equipped with factory-manufactured water-cooled outboard motors, boats with electric motors, and non-motorized boats. We prohibit boats with aircooled engines, fan boats, hovercraft, and personal watercraft (jet skis, jet boats, wave runners, etc.). Season 2020 - 2021 A.R.M. Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge Hunt Permit • We allow airboats by permit only during designated times of the year. Contact the refuge headquarters for airboat permitting information. (Special Use Permit Application, FWS Form 3-1383-G) Name ____________________________ Address ___________________________ • We prohibit unrestricted airboat travel not associated with hunting. _________________________________ I have read and understand A.R.M. Loxahatchee NWR Hunt Regulations. Hunting Regulations Hunting regulations are designed to provide safe recreational opportunities through the wise use of renewable wildlife resources. Hunting is permitted in accordance with Federal regulations governing public use on National Wildlife Refuges as set forth in Title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Hunting will be in accordance with applicable Federal and State of Florida regulations subject to the conditions stated on the next pages. Signature (This permit valid only when signed.) 1 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Specific Hunting Regulations • The possession or use of alcohol while hunting is prohibited. Safety Be prepared. Watch for changing weather conditions. • Hunters must leave the hunt area once their bag limit is filled. • Non-toxic ammunition is required during all hunts. • Licenses, permits, hunting equipment, effects and vehicles, vessels and other conveyances are subject to inspection by law enforcement officers. Please do not leave valuables in your vehicle. • Hunters may only enter and leave the refuge at designated entrances. Tell a relative or friend where you are going and when you should return. Car

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