J. N."Ding" Darling

National Wildlife Refuge - Florida

The J. N. "Ding" Darling National Wildlife Refuge is located in southwestern Florida, on Sanibel Island in the Gulf of Mexico. It is named after the cartoonist Jay Norwood "Ding" Darling.

maps

Map of the J.N. 'Ding' Darlng National Wildlife Refuge Complex (NWR), consisting of the Ding Darling NWR, Pine Island NWR, Island Bay NWR, Matlacha Pass NWR, Caloosahatchee NWR. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).J.N. Ding Darling - Refuge Complex Map

Map of the J.N. 'Ding' Darlng National Wildlife Refuge Complex (NWR), consisting of the Ding Darling NWR, Pine Island NWR, Island Bay NWR, Matlacha Pass NWR, Caloosahatchee NWR. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

brochures

Brochure of J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).J.N. Ding Darling - Brochure

Brochure of J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Bailey Tract Info and Map for J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).J.N. Ding Darling - Bailey Tract Info and Map

Bailey Tract Info and Map for J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Birds at J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).J.N. Ding Darling - Birds

Birds at J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Fishing and Boating at J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).J.N. Ding Darling - Fishing and Boating

Fishing and Boating at J.N. Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

J. N. Ding Darling NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/JN_Ding_Darling https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._N._%22Ding%22_Darling_National_Wildlife_Refuge The J. N. "Ding" Darling National Wildlife Refuge is located in southwestern Florida, on Sanibel Island in the Gulf of Mexico. It is named after the cartoonist Jay Norwood "Ding" Darling.
Observation Guidelines Respect wildlife – Remember you are For an enjoyable visit ... in their home. Leave nothing but footprints; take nothing but pictures. At the J.N. “Ding” Darling NWR, we encourage visitors to respectfully enjoy wildlife at a safe distance. The disturbance or harassment of wildlife on a national wildlife refuge is unethical and illegal, and can result in hefty fines or arrest. Disturbance or harassment of wildlife is defined as any activity that affects or changes the natural behavior of wildlife, which can be detrimental to the animal’s health, safety, or productivity. Types of activities that can cause disturbance or harassment are: • • • • • • Getting too close to or chasing wildlife Using flash photography in close proximity to wildlife Playing recorded bird/wildlife calls Moving or cutting vegetation near a nest Feeding wildlife Throwing objects at wildlife Witnesses to any of these types of violations are encouraged to report them immediately to Refuge Management at (239) 472-1100. Respect wildlife and other visitors when viewing and photographing wildlife. To all who take pictures, use courtesy to fellow visitors and wildlife. Wildlife Drive is one-way, 15mph road, seatbelts required. Cars make good observation blinds because the wildlife have become accustomed to them. For better observation of feeding, resting, and preening birds, minimize noise by turning down radios, closing doors quietly, and speaking softly. Park at the edge of the road, on the right hand side but not where birds are close to the road. Please place all trash and recyclables in receptacles. Otherwise, wildlife could ingest or become entangled in plastic and other trash. They often become ill and die. Observe all speed zones and closed areas when boating. Manatees can be injured by boat propellers and birds can be disturbed when approached too closely. Federal and Florida State boating regulations apply. All refuge waters are slow speed/minimum wake zones. All refuge islands and lands accessed by water are closed to public entry. Motorized boats under 14 feet and non-motorized canoes and kayaks of any length may be launched on the right (North) side of Wildlife Drive. Carry water, sunscreen, binoculars, and bug spray. Check out America’s Best Restrooms of 2018. Nature at your fingertips Download the FREE Discover Ding Game & Wildlife Spotting App Head out on Wildlife Drive and test your knowledge using the first of its kind–place-based nature trivia game that helps you see more with Seymour! Share photos & field tips, and see what others are posting even when you return home. Available for both iPhone and Android. 2000 snoitaluegR gnitaoB dna gnhisiF egu ef-R eflidliW lanoitaN gnliraD ”gnDi“ .N.J Stay Connected #dingdarlingnwr @dingdarlingrefuge @dingdarling @ Ding Darling Wildlife Society @ dingdarlingwildlifesociety DingDarlingSociety.org Wildlife Drive is a 4 -mile, one-way paved road that is handicap accessible. The 2-mile Indigo Trail enables visitors to see alligators, wading birds, and other wildlife. The Indigo Trail starts at the Visitor & Education Center and ends at the Cross Dike. Visit the Wildlife Education Boardwalk with Tower 3/10-mile along the way. The 1/3-mile Wulfert Keys Trail takes visitors to an open view of the Pine Island Sound. The 1/3-mile Calusa Shell Mound Trail has interpretive signs to inform visitors of Calusa Indian life history. More than 1 3/4-miles of trails are located at the Bailey Tract on Tarpon Bay Road, where alligators, herons, egrets, waterfowl, and other wildlife are found (see other side). J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge 1 Wildlife Drive Sanibel, Florida 33957 www.fws.gov/dingdarling 239-472-1100 The National Wildlife Refuge System... J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge is one of more than 560 refuges in the National Wildlife Refuge System. The System, encompassing more than 150 million acres, is the nation’s largest network of lands and waters managed specifically for wildlife. The Refuge System is administered by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, an agency of the Department of the Interior. Tram Pick-up/Drop-off January-April along Sanibel-Captiva Road May-December Visitor & Education Center lot Wildlife Education Boardwalk and Tower WILDLIFE DRIVE CLOSED TO ALL ACCESS ON FRIDAYS Visitor & Education Center Canoe/kayak Launch Mangrove Overlook Cross Dike Pavilion Observation Tower Restrooms Fishing Pier Water Control Structures WS Refuge Lands Closed to Public Access WS This Blue Goose, designed by Jay Norwood “Ding” Darling, is the symbol of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Printing made possible by “Ding” Darling Wildlife Society July 2020 Wildlife Education Boardwalk with Tower Visitor & Education Center and Administration Headquarters Tram Ticket sales. Tram tickets sale and restrooms. Refuge lands Refuge lands closed to public access Use designated trails only BUCK KEY KAYAK TRAIL Canoe/
The Bailey Tract Open everyday dawn to dusk ... No Fee. . . Suggested activities: Wildlife viewing, Photography, Fishing. History • The 100 acres of the Bailey Tract were first owned by Frank P. Bailey, whose descendants own Bailey’s Store on Tarpon Bay Road. • The tract was originally pristine spartina marsh, with cordgrass and sawgrass. Today, cattails have replaced much of the spartina, due to the human impact of nutrient runoff. Strangler fig, and buttonwood are the most common trees, and saltbush and wax myrtle are the most common shrubs. • The dikes which visitors walk on were built to create open water in order to attract waterfowl. The airplane canal, along the southern edge of the tract is connected to the Sanibel River, into which freshwater drains off the island. • The first refuge manager, Tommy Wood, used the canal as a take-off and landing strip for the sea plane from which he conducted wildlife surveys. What can I see? Birds: Wading birds like White Ibis, egrets and herons are common in the Bailey Tract, and Osprey are frequent, but the freshwater environment offers a habitat for different birds that avoid the salty mangrove habitat. Species of ducks, bitterns, rails, Common Moorhen, Common Snipe, American Kestrel and others are sometimes found here. Songbirds like warblers and sparrows are more likely to be found in the Bailey Tract, especially during migration seasons when the freshwater habitat provides an important stopover site. Reptiles: Alligators like all reptiles are ectotherms (“cold-blooded”) and are frequently seen basking on a sunny bank, frequently accompanied by turtles. Snakes, lizards, and frogs can also be found but are less likely to be seen. Mammals: River otters, bobcats and armadillos are present in the Bailey Tract, but are rarely seen. Raccoons, marsh rabbits, Sanibel Rice-rats, house mice, and opossum are other mammals of this habitat. Finding a spot to sit and watch quietly is often the best way to get a look at these shy creatures. Bailey Tract Goals The refuge hopes to restore the tract to its original spartina marsh habitat, control the invasive plants, continue to protect the native plant and animal species that occur here, and provide wildlife viewing and interpretation opportunities for refuge visitors. Restoration may also encourage past natives, such as the Smooth-billed Ani, to return. Please remember! • Keep a respectful distance from all wildlife. • Please do not collect plants or natural artifacts. • Respect other visitors’ experience. • Bring water, sunscreen, hat and insect repellant. • Binoculars & camera are highly recommended. • Fishing permitted: (Fresh water fishing permit required) Smith Pond and Airplane Canal • Fishing not permitted: Mangrove Head Pond, Tower Pond, and Tarpon Bay Slough oad Inn R eH rov th Nor d Pon Red Trail 1.1 Mile ike th D r Sou we I/To AN ond P service road (closed access) Bailey Tract Dike ike le D d Mid Red Mangrove Island 1 Mile ead .35 Mile Yellow Trail Airplane Canal Green Trail rp Ta on lou gh Parking yS Ba Kiosk .75 Mile Blue Trail Tarpon Bay Road d Islan ng ond th P Smi Ma .24 Mile Orange Trail Sanibel River
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service J.N.”Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge Bird Checklist Sanibel-Captiva Islands and Surrounding Areas Welcome to the J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge. The 6,400 acres of the Refuge contain a variety of subtropical habitats, including the upland ridges and freshwater swales of the Island’s interior ecosystem, mangrove forests, and the seagrass beds of its estuarine mangrove fringes. Resident and migratory birds depend on these various habitats for their existence. How To Use Your Checklist The bird checklist includes 245 species and is designed to be informative and simple to use. Symbols which appear in this checklist represent the following: Seasonal Appearance F.................... Fall (September-November) W .................. Winter (December-February) Sp.................. Spring (March- May) S.................... Summer (June- August) Seasonal Abundance a abundant (a very common species most likely to be seen) c common (likely to be seen in suitable habitat) u uncommon (usually present but not certain to be seen) o occasional (seen only a few times during a season) r rare or accidental (seen only a very few times during the past ten years) The abundance designations shown above are for the Refuge, Sanibel and Captiva Islands, the surrounding waters of the Gulf, estuaries, and area beaches (including the Sanibel Causeway and Bunche Beach). Some species will be more or less common in different habitats, and tide levels will influence the number of shorebirds and wading birds to be found. Cameron Michael You may want to check the birds you are able to find and identify. If you should find an unlisted species, please let us know at Refuge Headquarters. We will appreciate your help in updating our records. Mangrove Cuckoo F W Sp S Waterfowl Black-bellied Whistling-Duck r Snow Goose Muscovy Duck r Wood Duck r Gadwall r American Wigeon r Mallard Mottled Duck a Blue-winged Teal c Northern Shoveler Northern Pintail Green-winged Teal Redhead Ring-necked Duck Lesser Scaup Black Scoter Bufflehead Hooded Merganser r Common Merganser Red-breasted Merganser o Ruddy Duck r r r r r r r r r r r r r a a c c r r r r r r r r r r r r r r u r r c c u u a c u r r r a u o r r c r c a a a a Cormorants and Anhingas Double-crested Cormorant Anhinga a a a a u a a a c a r a Limpkins Limpkin r r r r r r Cranes Sandhill Crane r r Sp r u r r c a c c c c u c u c a r c r c o r a a a a a c c c u c a r c r u r r c a a a a c u c u c a r c S American Flamingo Wood Stork American Bittern Least Bittern Great Blue Heron Great Egret Snowy Egret Little Blue Heron Tricolored Heron Reddish Egret Cattle Egret Green Heron Black-crowned Night-Heron Yellow-crowned Night-Heron White Ibis Glossy Ibis Roseate Spoonbill r u r c a c c c c u c u c c r c Black Vulture Turkey Vulture Osprey Swallow-tailed Kite Northern Harrier Sharp-shinned Hawk Cooper’s Hawk Bald Eagle Red-shouldered Hawk Broad-winged Hawk Short-tailed Hawk Red-tailed Hawk American Kestrel Merlin Peregrine Falcon u u u c c c a a a o u o o o o o o o o o c c c c c c o o o o r r r c c c u u u u u u o u a u r u c o r r Rails, Gallinules, and Coots Pelicans American White Pelican Brown Pelican W Vultures, Kites, Hawks, and Falcons Frigatebirds and Gannets Magnificent Frigatebird Northern Gannet F Wading Birds Loons and Grebes Common Loon o Pied-billed Grebe c Horned Grebe Clapper Rail r King Rail Virginia Rail Sora r Common Gallinule c American Coot c o r r u c c o r r o c c o r F W Sp S Shorebirds Black-bellied Plover a a Snowy Plover u u Wilson’s Plover u u Semipalmated Plover c c Piping Plover u u Killdeer c c American Oystercatcher u u Black-necked Stilt American Avocet r r Spotted Sandpiper c c Solitary Sandpiper Greater Yellowlegs u c Lesser Yellowlegs u c Willet a a Whimbrel r r Long-billed Curlew o o Marbled Godwit u c Ruddy Turnstone c c Red Knot u c Sanderling a a Semipalmated Sandpiper r Western Sandpiper c c Least Sandpiper c c White-rumped Sandpiper r Pectoral Sandpiper r Dunlin c a Stilt Sandpiper r r Short-billed Dowitcher a a Long-billed Dowitcher r r Wilson’s Snipe r o a u u c o c u c r c r c u a r o u c c a r c c r r c r a r o r r r a a a c a c c c c r o r r o r u u r r r r r r r c c c c a c c c c a a a F W Sp S Razorbills u u u u c o c r u o u u a r r r c Razorbill r Pigeons and Doves Rock Pigeon White-crowned Pigeon Eurasian Collared-Dove White-winged Dove Mourning Dove Common Ground-Dove r r c o a c r r c o a c r r c o a c r r c o a c u o r r r o r c o r r c o r Cuckoos and Anis Yellow-billed Cuckoo o Mangrove Cuckoo o r Black-billed Cuckoo Smooth-billed Ani r r Owls Barn Owl Eastern Screech-Owl Great Horned Owl Barred Owl r c o r r c o r Goatsuckers Common Nig
Welcome to the J. N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge. Freshwater Fishing The Refuge offers excellent fishing opportunities and quiet, scenic areas for recreational boating and paddling. The care and protection of natural resources is our primary goal. All Florida state laws apply to fishing and boating in the Refuge. There are also specific refuge regulations for fishing and crabbing. If you have questions, please contact the refuge staff at the Visitor & Education Center or call (239) 472-1100. www.fws.gov/dingdarling • Kayaks/canoes are prohibited in the Bailey Tract, except Seaplane Canal and Sanibel River Slough (refer to the Bailey Tract Brochure) • If the hook is engaged in the body of the fish, cut the line as close to the fish as possible. Cutting the line is better than ripping it out. Catch and Release • Gently land a fish to be released by netting and carefully removing the hook. Avoid dragging it on the ground or allowing it to flop around on the bottom of the boat. Fishing Regulations/Fishing Licenses • Freshwater fishing on the Refuge is allowed at Smith Pond and Seaplane Canal at the Bailey Tract (fishing at Smith Pond is only permissible from the bank). All other waters of the Bailey Tract are closed to fishing. • When releasing fish, certain procedures listed below will assist their recovery after being caught. • To minimize damage to the fish, use plain steel hooks or plain steel with bronze finish instead of stainless steel, and preferably barbless. - U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service • Fish have a protective coat of “mucus” that should not be removed. Do not handle or hold fish with cloth, metal tongs, leather, etc. Wet your hands to avoid removing mucus. J.N.”Ding” Darling • Release fish as soon as possible with a minimum of handling to avoid removing the fishes’ protective mucus layer. National Wildlife Refuge Fishin­­­­g and B­­­oating Regulations • Gently return the fish into the water, do not throw it back. If the fish is weak and sluggish, it can be “resuscitated” by holding it gently in the water (head pointed towards current) and moving it slowly in a forward motion, until it can swim away. This will provide oxygenated water to the gills. (continued) Wulfert Keys Pole/Troll Zone • Fishing licenses are available through our concession at the Tarpon Bay Recreation Area, other businesses on Sanibel Island, or directly from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). For ordering information from FWC, visit https://license.myfwc.com or call 1 (888) 347-4356. • All areas of water on the left (south) side of Wildlife Drive are closed to the public. • Fish harvested in the Refuge must remain in whole condition while in the Refuge for law enforcement inspection. J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge 1 Wildlife Drive Sanibel, Florida 33957 www.fws.gov/dingdarling 239-472-1100 • Commercial fishing is prohibited. Other commercial activities require a special use permit, including charter boat fishing and tours. • All visitors must exit Refuge lands and waters by the end of civil twilight (1/2 hour after legal sunset). U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service http://www.fws.gov/dingdarling Saltwater Fishing • Saltwater fishing from shore is allowed on both sides of Wildlife Drive. June 2017 • To prevent cast nets from becoming entangled we prohibit the use of cast nets from any water control structure/ supportive rock affixed to Wildlife Drive. No use of cast nets from the left (south) side of Wildlife Drive. No Motor Zone • The use of bows or spears is prohibited from Wildlife Drive, or any structure or trail affixed to Wildlife Drive. Refuge Boundary (pole/paddle only) Crabbing Regulations No Motor Zone • A saltwater fishing license is required for all crabbing. (pole/paddle only) • Blue crabs may be harvested with hand-held dip nets only. Wildlife Drive • There is a limit of 20 crabs per person per day; no more than 10 may be female. Harvest of egg-bearing crabs is prohibited. Indigo Trail Canoe/Kayak Launch Sites Refuge Boundary • Use of bait or traps is prohibited. • The taking of horseshoe crabs, stone crabs, and spider crabs is prohibited. Boating Regulations (Refer to Map on Back) • All Refuge waters, including Tarpon Bay, are zoned slow speed/minimum wake. Caution: watch for all wildlife, including manatees. • All waters on the left (south) side of Wildlife Drive are closed to all entry. • Two launch areas for boats, canoes and kayaks are located on Wildlife Drive. Refer to map for locations. • Motorized boats over 14 feet in length are not permitted to launch off of Wildlife Drive. This rule does not apply to non-motorized canoes and kayaks. • Launch site #1 is in the No Motor Zone. Motorized boats, electric and gas, must pole or paddle through the No Motor Zone with motors out of water. 2 • Launch site #2 is not in the No Motor Zone. Boats may operate motors from this site. • We prohibit airboats, hovercraft and personal wat

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