National Key Deer Refuge

National Wildlife Refuge - Florida

The National Key Deer Refuge is a National Wildlife Refuge located on Big Pine Key and No Name Key in the Florida Keys in Monroe County, Florida. The refuge is home to the endangered Key Deer, a subspecies of the White-tailed deer that is endemic to the Florida Keys and has a current population of around 800 animals. 21 other threatened and endangered species of plants and animals are also found on the refuge, which includes 2,400 acres (9.7 km2) of upland forests, 5,100 acres (21 km2) of wetlands, and 1,050 acres (4.2 km2) of marsh. 2,278 acres (9.22 km2) of the refuge have been designated as a wilderness area.

brochures

Brochure of National Key Deer Refuge, a National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).National Key Deer Refuge - Brochure

Brochure of National Key Deer Refuge, a National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Information Tearsheet of National Key Deer Refuge, Key West, Great White Heron and Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Great White Heron - Information Tearsheet

Information Tearsheet of National Key Deer Refuge, Key West, Great White Heron and Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Brochure and Map of Key West and Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Great White Heron - Brochure and Map

Brochure and Map of Key West and Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Birds at the Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Florida Keys - Birds

Birds at the Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Saltwater Fishing Regulations for Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Florida Keys - Saltwater Fishing Regulations

Saltwater Fishing Regulations for Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) in Florida. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

National Key Deer Refuge https://www.fws.gov/refuge/national_key_deer_refuge/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Key_Deer_Refuge The National Key Deer Refuge is a National Wildlife Refuge located on Big Pine Key and No Name Key in the Florida Keys in Monroe County, Florida. The refuge is home to the endangered Key Deer, a subspecies of the White-tailed deer that is endemic to the Florida Keys and has a current population of around 800 animals. 21 other threatened and endangered species of plants and animals are also found on the refuge, which includes 2,400 acres (9.7 km2) of upland forests, 5,100 acres (21 km2) of wetlands, and 1,050 acres (4.2 km2) of marsh. 2,278 acres (9.22 km2) of the refuge have been designated as a wilderness area.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Nature Center UNAUTHORIZED ENTRY PROHIBITED U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Walking Trails Watson Trail 2/3 mile (1 km) Mannillo Trail 800 feet (200m) U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICE Hiking Trails IO M EN T OF THE I NT E All public entry prohibited Refuge Lands. Look for Refuge Boundary Signs. Private Property. Respect Private Property Rights. R R T Watson and Mannillo Trails Blue Hole This sign indicates the boundary of the refuge. The Refuge Manager has authorized this area open during daylight hours to public access for wildlife-dependent activities. This sign means that there is NO public access permitted in the area beyond this sign. Access is prohibited to protect wildlife and habitat and/or to protect visitors. Hiking on designated trails Pets on leashes (only on National Key Deer Refuge) Big Pine St. Bicycles permitted except the Watson and Mannillo Trails No Name Key Watson Horses are permitted on refuge lands, access limited, consult refuge manager Blvd. Key Deer Blvd. This blue goose, created by J.N. "Ding" Darling, is the symbol for the National Wildlife Refuge System. Big Pine Key To protect you, other visitors and the environment, the following activities are prohibited on National Key Deer Refuge Hunting or discharging firearms Wilder Road 1 0 National Key Deer, Key West and Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuges Miles 0 1 Camping on refuge lands Km 1.0 Fires Nature Center 30587 Overseas Highway Big Pine Key, FL 33043 Nature Center phone - 305/872 0774 Administrative office phone - 305/872 2239 Key Deer Hotline - 888/404 3922 Ext. 7 Email: keydeer@fws.gov Website: www.fws.gov/refuge/National_Key_Deer_Refuge Facebook: Florida Keys Refuges The use of metal detectors to search for antiquities or treasure. N To Key West July 2020 Personal photography Koehn Avenue Watson Blvd. Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge 10750 County Road 905 Key Largo, FL 33037 Email: crocodilelake@fws.gov To enhance your visit, the following wildlife-dependent activities are permitted on National Key Deer Refuge Fishing on Ohio Key Wildlife and wildlands observation AREA BEYOND THIS SIGN CLOSED PA The four refuges include more than 416,000 acres of land and open water. Most keys are fringed along the shoreline by red and black mangroves. On larger keys, this gives way to a wide variety of tropical and subtropical trees and shrubs on slightly higher ground. These lands maintain a unique biodiversity by protecting and preserving important marine water, freshwater wetlands, mangroves, tropical hardwood forests (hammocks), and pine rockland forests. Together, these habitats provide the four basic components of a habitat- food water, shelter, and open space, necessary for the survival of 24 federally listed threatened or endangered species and other native wildlife. As commercial and residential development in the Keys increases, pressure on limited land and water resources become more crucial to the survival of this fragile ecosystem. Legend DE Welcome to the Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges - National Key Deer Refuge, Great White Heron, Key West and Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuges. These four refuges are located in an extraordinary and seemingly endless expanse of sea, islands and sky. These refuges are part of a vast subtropical ecosystem. This distinct chain of islands stretches almost 150 miles from the Key deer southeastern tip of Florida, curving gently westward dividing the aqua-green waters of the Gulf of Mexico from the distant deep blue Atlantic. NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE R National Key Deer Refuge, Key West, Great White Heron and Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuges U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Poles or pipes such as beach umbrellas Long Beach Road 1 To Marathon Feeding, injuring, harassing, or removing wildlife, plants, or natural items No fishing or swimming at Blue Hole Introducing exotic plants or wildlife Storing equipment or property on refuge lands Commercial activity without a permit No drones U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Key Deer Refuge The 84,351 acre National Key Deer Refuge is located in the Lower Keys on 25 islands and consists of a patchwork of small and large tracts of pine forest, mangrove forest, hardwood hammocks, freshwater wetlands and marine waters. Key deer are found on these 25 islands. The Key deer is the smallest sub-species of the Virginia white-tailed deer found throughout most of North America. Because the Key deer population is low and remains under threat of extinction from human interaction, the subspecies is federally listed as endangered. The current population is estimated at over 800. Key deer can best be seen at dawn or dusk throughout Big Pine and sometimes on other islands between Big Pine and Cudjoe/Sugarloaf Keys. Please help keep the Key deer wild by not feeding them. Not only is it illegal, it’s bad for their health. T
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Nature Center UNAUTHORIZED ENTRY PROHIBITED U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Walking Trails Watson Trail 2/3 mile (1 km) Mannillo Trail 800 feet (200m) U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICE Hiking Trails IO M EN T OF THE I NT E All public entry prohibited Refuge Lands. Look for Refuge Boundary Signs. Private Property. Respect Private Property Rights. R R T Watson and Mannillo Trails Blue Hole This sign indicates the boundary of the refuge. The Refuge Manager has authorized this area open during daylight hours to public access for wildlife-dependent activities. This sign means that there is NO public access permitted in the area beyond this sign. Access is prohibited to protect wildlife and habitat and/or to protect visitors. Hiking on designated trails Pets on leashes (only on National Key Deer Refuge) Big Pine St. Bicycles permitted except the Watson and Mannillo Trails No Name Key Watson Horses are permitted on refuge lands, access limited, consult refuge manager Blvd. Key Deer Blvd. This blue goose, created by J.N. "Ding" Darling, is the symbol for the National Wildlife Refuge System. Big Pine Key To protect you, other visitors and the environment, the following activities are prohibited on National Key Deer Refuge Hunting or discharging firearms Wilder Road 1 0 National Key Deer, Key West and Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuges Miles 0 1 Camping on refuge lands Km 1.0 Fires Nature Center 30587 Overseas Highway Big Pine Key, FL 33043 Nature Center phone - 305/872 0774 Administrative office phone - 305/872 2239 Key Deer Hotline - 888/404 3922 Ext. 7 Email: keydeer@fws.gov Website: www.fws.gov/refuge/National_Key_Deer_Refuge Facebook: Florida Keys Refuges The use of metal detectors to search for antiquities or treasure. N To Key West July 2020 Personal photography Koehn Avenue Watson Blvd. Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge 10750 County Road 905 Key Largo, FL 33037 Email: crocodilelake@fws.gov To enhance your visit, the following wildlife-dependent activities are permitted on National Key Deer Refuge Fishing on Ohio Key Wildlife and wildlands observation AREA BEYOND THIS SIGN CLOSED PA The four refuges include more than 416,000 acres of land and open water. Most keys are fringed along the shoreline by red and black mangroves. On larger keys, this gives way to a wide variety of tropical and subtropical trees and shrubs on slightly higher ground. These lands maintain a unique biodiversity by protecting and preserving important marine water, freshwater wetlands, mangroves, tropical hardwood forests (hammocks), and pine rockland forests. Together, these habitats provide the four basic components of a habitat- food water, shelter, and open space, necessary for the survival of 24 federally listed threatened or endangered species and other native wildlife. As commercial and residential development in the Keys increases, pressure on limited land and water resources become more crucial to the survival of this fragile ecosystem. Legend DE Welcome to the Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges - National Key Deer Refuge, Great White Heron, Key West and Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuges. These four refuges are located in an extraordinary and seemingly endless expanse of sea, islands and sky. These refuges are part of a vast subtropical ecosystem. This distinct chain of islands stretches almost 150 miles from the Key deer southeastern tip of Florida, curving gently westward dividing the aqua-green waters of the Gulf of Mexico from the distant deep blue Atlantic. NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE R National Key Deer Refuge, Key West, Great White Heron and Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuges U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Poles or pipes such as beach umbrellas Long Beach Road 1 To Marathon Feeding, injuring, harassing, or removing wildlife, plants, or natural items No fishing or swimming at Blue Hole Introducing exotic plants or wildlife Storing equipment or property on refuge lands Commercial activity without a permit No drones U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Key Deer Refuge The 84,351 acre National Key Deer Refuge is located in the Lower Keys on 25 islands and consists of a patchwork of small and large tracts of pine forest, mangrove forest, hardwood hammocks, freshwater wetlands and marine waters. Key deer are found on these 25 islands. The Key deer is the smallest sub-species of the Virginia white-tailed deer found throughout most of North America. Because the Key deer population is low and remains under threat of extinction from human interaction, the subspecies is federally listed as endangered. The current population is estimated at over 800. Key deer can best be seen at dawn or dusk throughout Big Pine and sometimes on other islands between Big Pine and Cudjoe/Sugarloaf Keys. Please help keep the Key deer wild by not feeding them. Not only is it illegal, it’s bad for their health. T
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Key West and Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuges Key West National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1908 as a preserve and breeding ground for native birds and other wildlife. The refuge encompasses more than 200,000 acres with only 2,000 acres of land. The area is home to more than 250 species of birds and is important for sea turtle nesting. All of the islands in the refuge are designated as a part of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Designated wilderness areas are managed to minimize human impacts and influences and to let natural processes occur without intervention. The refuge limits human use and influence in order to preserve the quality, character and integrity of these protected wilderness lands. Sanctuary Preservation Areas have been designated at Sand Key, Rock Key and Eastern Dry Rocks (all located within Key West NWR) to protect coral reef habitats. Boating in the backcountry is challenging due to very shallow water depths. If you should run aground, please do not try to power-off the area since this results in extreme damage to the environment. Instead, trim up the motor and try to walk the boat to deeper water. You might have to wait for a high-tide to accomplish this. For the most current National Marine Sanctuary regulations please contact the Sanctuary office at 305/809 4700. Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1938 as a haven for great white herons, migratory birds, and other wildlife. The refuge consists of almost 200,000 acres of open water and islands, and is known locally as the “backcountry.” The refuge provides critical nesting, feeding, and resting areas for hundreds of species of birds and sea turtles. The refuge was created to protect great white herons from extinction since the population was decimated by the demand for feathered hats. Protection of great white herons was successful, and these magnificent powder-white birds can be observed feeding on tidal-flats around hundreds of backcountry islands each dawn and dusk. Mangrove islands are important bird nesting and roosting areas, and provide virtually no public use opportunities because upland areas do not exist. Islands with beaches are open to limited public access as marked with signs. Please obey refuge signs to help minimize disturbance to wildlife. Refuge Headquarters............................................................305/872 2239 n No fishing allowed in Sanctuary Preservation Areas. n Do not touch coral or anchor on coral. n Do not discharge waste water n Use dive flag when snorkeling or diving. Monroe County Sheriff.....................................................305/289 2430 n Use mooring buoys when available. Marine Mammal Stranding Hotline...............................888/404 3922 Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary......................305/809 4700 Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission....305/289 2320 U.S. Coast Guard Key West.............................................305/292 8856 Injured or dead sea turtles...................................................305/743 2552 For questions about allowable activities within the refuges please call 305/872 0774. Injured or sick birds Key West......................................................................305/292 1008 Marathon.....................................................................305/743 8382 Allowed Activities n n n n Great white heron/USFWS Refuge Information/Visitor Center................................305/872 0774 Sanctuary Regulations in Refuges n The Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary was designated in 1990 and protects 2,800 square nautical miles from Key Largo to the Dry Tortugas. This includes the waters of the Key West and Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuges. Visitors to the refuges should be aware that the sanctuary has established additional rules to protect the marine environment. The sanctuary protects the marine portions of the refuges through a management partnership between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This blue goose, designed by J. N. "Ding" Darling, has become a symbol of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Tavernier.....................................................................305/852 4486 Sport and commercial fishing in accordance with state and federal regulations. Recreational boating with conventional propeller- driven crafts, kayaks, canoes and sailboats. SCUBA diving and snorkeling. Wildlife viewing and photography. Refuge hours on islands are 1/2 hour before sunrise to 1/2 hour after sunset. Monroe County Animal Control Key West SPCA..........................................................305/294 4857 Brown pelican/USFWS Prohibited Activities n Use of personal watercrafts, hovercrafts and airboats. n Landing airplanes, helicopters or ultra-lights. n Water skiing. n Camping, open
US. Fish and Wildlife Service Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges Bird List ©Paula Cannon Welcome to the Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges. There are three Refuges in the lower Florida Keys: Key West, Great White Heron and National Key Deer National Wildlife Refuges. These refuges are part of a subtropical ecoregion and provide habitat for many species of birds, some of which are unique to the Florida Keys and south Florida. Combined, the refuges total approximately 23,000 acres of land. However, the open water within the boundaries of Key West and Great White Heron Refuges, covers an area of about 400,000 acres. All of the refuges were established to protect wildlife and their habitat. Key West National Wildlife Refuge and Great White Heron Refuge were established in 1908 and 1938 respectively, to protect herons and egrets from plume hunters. National Key Deer Refuge was established in 1957 to protect the endangered Key Deer and other wildlife. Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges 179 Key Deer Blvd. Big Pine Key Plaza Big Pine Key, Florida 33043 305/872 0774 http://southeast.fws.gov nationalkeydeer@fws.gov U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service 1 800/344 WILD January 2013 The best times for birding are during the spring and fall migration. Some of the more unique birds that can be seen are great white herons, antillean nighthawk, gray kingbird, black-whiskered vireo, white-crowned pigeon and the elusive mangrove cuckoo. Together, these three Refuges protect habitat for 285 species of birds. Key West and Great White Heron Refuges are composed of many small islands locally known as the Backcountry. Key West National Wildlife Refuge lies west of Key West. Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuge encompasses many of the Keys north of U.S. Highway 1 from Key West to just west of Marathon. These two Refuges are accessible only by boat. National Key Deer Refuge and surrounding non-refuge lands also afford the best opportunities for birding. Respect private property if the property is privately owned you must obtain permission to enter. It is recommended that you lock your car and lock your valuables in the trunk or take them with you when you leave it. Directions (north, south, east, and west) are given relative to compass headings, not to directions on US 1. Bahia Honda State Park (MM 37.5): An entrance fee is required. Continue through the gate, go right, and then park in the lot on the left. Walk the beach for shorebirds, gulls, and terns. Go to the parking area on the right - warblers may be seen in trees near the old store. Other birds can be found along the beach at the east end and along the road past the camping area. East end of West Summerland Key (MM 34.9): just west of the Bahia Honda Bridge, turn north and follow to the “Donut” (a manmade cove). This is a good area for shorebirds, terns, and gulls. Snowy plovers have been seen here. Big Pine Key (MM 32.9): just after entering onto the Key, turn south onto Long Beach Drive and stop along the road at any convenient spot. Ovenbirds, warblers, waterthrushes, siskins, buntings, and orioles may be present during migration and in winter. Big Pine Key (MM 30.2): turn north at the traffic light and then an immediate left onto Key Deer Blvd. (the Refuge office is in the shopping center on the right). Short-tailed hawk and turkey vultures may be observed soaring overhead. At the Blue Hole, 2.5 miles north on Key Deer Blvd., pied-billed grebes and green-backed herons may be present. The masked duck and least grebe also have been seen here so it is worth a visit. Opposite the Blue Hole, travel onto Big Pine St. and then left onto Koehn Blvd. Shorebirds may be present at the mud flats near the end of the road and at the boat ramp. To go to No Name Key, go east on Watson Blvd., left at the stop sign, and follow Watson Blvd. over the large bridge to No Name Key. Yellow headed blackbird, darkeyed junco, cave swallow, and Swainsons warbler have been found here. The end of the road is also a good location for mangrove cuckoo and black-whiskered vireo. Before leaving Big Pine a good spot to look for antillean nighthawks is in the vicinity of the west end of Watson Blvd and along Narcissus Ave. Antilleans are frequently present late in the day during spring and summer. US. Fish and Wildlife Service Summerland Key (MM 25): Take the first left after the bridge and a salt pond is on your right. Ibis and egrets can be found here. Take a right onto Margaret St and then the next left. A fresh water pond is on the left. Ducks, least bittern, sora rail, and white-crowned pigeon are found here. Moorhens nest here. Sugarloaf Key (MM 17): Turn south at traffic light and drive slowly to the end of the road. Hawks, harriers, woodpeckers can be seen along here. There is the possibility of ducks on the pond on the right and pine siskin, indigo bunting, and grosbeak in the pine trees after crossing the bridge. How to use your checklist The checklist is arranged in the order es
Florida Recreational Saltwater Fishing Regulations Issued: June 2021 New regulations are highlighted in red (please visit: MyFWC.com/Fishing/Saltwater/Recreational Regulations apply to state waters of the Gulf and Atlantic for the most current regulations) All art: © Diane Rome Peebles, except blueline tilefish and golden tilefish (Duane Raver); lionfish (FWC) Reef Fish Snapper General Snapper Regulations: • Snapper Aggregate Bag Limit – Within state waters of the Atlantic and Gulf, all species of snapper are included in a 10 fish per harvester per day aggregate bag limit in any combination of snapper species, unless stated otherwise. • Seasons – If no seasonal information is provided, the species is open year-round. Other Snapper Snapper, Cubera  u l Snapper, Red Minimum Size Limits: • Atlantic and Gulf - 12" (see below) Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic and Gulf - 10 per harvester under 30", included within snapper aggregate bag limit • May additionally harvest up to 2 over 30" per harvester or vessel, whichever is less, and these 2 fish over 30" are not included within snapper aggregate bag limit  u l X Snapper, Vermilion u l X Minimum Size Limits: • Atlantic - 20" • Gulf - 16" Season: • Atlantic - Open year-round • Gulf - June 4 - July 28 Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic - 5 per harvester not included within snapper aggregate bag limit • Gulf - 10 per harvester not included within snapper aggregate bag limit Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic and Gulf - 2 per harvester • Gulf - Zero daily bag and possession limit for captain and crew on for-hire vessels. Snapper, Lane ul Minimum Size Limits: • Atlantic and Gulf - 8" Minimum Size Limits: • Atlantic - 12" • Gulf - 10" Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic - 10 per harvester • Gulf - 100 pounds per harvester, not included within snapper aggregate bag limit ul Minimum Size Limits: • Dog and Mahogany: Atlantic and Gulf - 12” • No minimum size limit for other snappers Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic and Gulf - 10 per harvester Grouper Snapper, Gray (Mangrove)  u l Snapper, Mutton  u l X Snapper, Schoolmaster ul Snapper, Yellowtail ulX Minimum Size Limits: • Atlantic and Gulf - 10" Minimum Size Limits: • Atlantic and Gulf - 18" Minimum Size Limits: • Atlantic and Gulf - 10" Minimum Size Limits: • Atlantic and Gulf - 12" total length Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic and Gulf - 5 per harvester Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic and Gulf - 5 per harvester Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic and Gulf - 10 per harvester Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic and Gulf - 10 per harvester Atlantic Grouper General Regulations: • Atlantic grouper regulations apply to all state waters of the Atlantic and all state waters off Monroe County (Gulf and Atlantic sides). • Atlantic Grouper/Tilefish Aggregate Bag Limit includes all species of grouper plus golden tilefish and blueline tilefish in a 3 fish per harvester per day aggregate bag limit in in any combination of species.Seasons – If no seasonal information is provided, the species is open year-round. Grouper, Black  u l X Grouper, Snowy Minimum Size Limits: • Atlantic - 24" • Gulf - 24" Season: • Atlantic - Closed Jan. 1–April 30 • Gulf - Open year-round l * Zero bag limit for captain and crew of for-hire vessels applies to gag, black, and red grouper only. l Minimum Size Limits: • Atlantic and Gulf - 20" Minimum Size Limits: • Atlantic and Gulf - None Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic - 1 per harvester • Gulf - 4 per harvester Season: • Atlantic - Closed Jan. 1–April 30 • Gulf - Open year-round Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic and Gulf - 1 per vessel per day of each species Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic - 3 per harvester • Gulf - 2 per Harvester* Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic - 1 per harvester. Only 1 fish can be gag or black • Gulf - 4 per harvester* Grouper, Scamp  u l Gag Grouper Minimum Size Limits: • Atlantic - 20" • Gulf - 16" Minimum Size Limits: • Atlantic - 24" • Gulf - 24" Season: • Atlantic - Closed Jan. 1–April 30 • Gulf - Open year-round Season: • Atlantic - Closed: Jan. 1–April 30 • Gulf - State waters off Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties: Open April 1 –June 30, & Sept 1–Dec. 31. • Gulf - State waters off all other counties: Open June 1–Dec. 31 Daily Recreational Bag Limit: • Atlantic - 3 per harvester • Gulf - 4 per harvester Grouper, Warsaw  u l X & Speckled Hind Minimum Size Limit: • Atlantic and Gulf - None Gulf Grouper General Regulations: • Gulf grouper regulations apply to all state waters of the Gulf except off Monroe County (where Atlantic rules apply). • Gulf Grouper Aggregate Bag Limit - all species of grouper in the Gulf are included in a 4 fish per harvester per day aggregate bag limit in any combination of grouper species. • Seasons – If no seasonal information is provided, the species is open year-round.

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