De Leon Springs

State Park - Florida

The park covers 625 acres in Volusia County, built around a natural spring, flowing at a rate of about 20 million gallons a day (Second Magnitude Spring), that remains 72 degrees Fahrenheit year-round and reaches a depth of 30 feet at the spring boil. Park wildlife includes manatees, alligators, white-tailed deer, turtles and otters. Among the birds that can be seen are anhingas, egrets, hawks, limpkins, ospreys, vultures, American bald eagles, American white ibis, belted kingfishers, American coots and great blue herons. Seasonal sightings may include Florida black bears (the park is connected to Lake George State Forest and Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge), manatees seeking relief from the cold during winter and migratory birds such as a variety of duck species.

maps

Recreation Map of Ocala National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Ocala - Recreation Map

Recreation Map of Ocala National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

brochures

Brochure of De Leon Springs State Park in Florida. Published by Florida State Parks.De Leon Springs - Brochure

Brochure of De Leon Springs State Park in Florida. Published by Florida State Parks.

De Leon Springs SP https://www.floridastateparks.org/parks-and-trails/de-leon-springs-state-park https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Leon_Springs_State_Park The park covers 625 acres in Volusia County, built around a natural spring, flowing at a rate of about 20 million gallons a day (Second Magnitude Spring), that remains 72 degrees Fahrenheit year-round and reaches a depth of 30 feet at the spring boil. Park wildlife includes manatees, alligators, white-tailed deer, turtles and otters. Among the birds that can be seen are anhingas, egrets, hawks, limpkins, ospreys, vultures, American bald eagles, American white ibis, belted kingfishers, American coots and great blue herons. Seasonal sightings may include Florida black bears (the park is connected to Lake George State Forest and Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge), manatees seeking relief from the cold during winter and migratory birds such as a variety of duck species.
Florida State Parks Florida Department of Environmental Protection Division of Recreation and Parks History & Nature The outstanding feature of DeLeon Springs State Park’s 600 acres is the headspring, with some 19 million gallons of water per day flowing from an underwater cavern at a constant year-round temperature of 72 degrees. The spring pool is artificially maintained for swimming. Wading birds such as herons, egrets and ibis stalk their prey down river, while coots and ducks dive for dinner and ospreys soar overhead. Alligators, otters and manatees are common. Above the spring is a hydric hammock, trees that flourish in wet conditions. Trails wind through a forest of red maples, sweet gums, magnolias, cabbage palms and water hickories filled with the sounds of woodpeckers and songbirds. Ferns, wildflowers and vines cover the ground. The endangered yellow anise tree is abundant here. Non-native ornamentals such as azaleas and various palm species were planted between the 1930s and 1960s near the trails and in the parking lot. The azaleas bloom throughout the park in early spring. A paved walkway leads to “Old Methuselah,” a huge bald cypress that is more than 500 years old. Visitors may notice an abundance of white or gray snail shells in the ground-evidence of centuries of occupation by Native American groups who came to the spring to gather food. They would cook the snails and discard piles of shells. Two dugout canoes found in the spring are among the oldest canoes in America (5,000 and 6,000 years old). DeLeon Springs State Park 601 Ponce DeLeon Boulevard DeLeon Springs, FL 32130 (386) 985-4212 FloridaStateParks.org • • • • • • • • • • Park Guidelines Central Florida DeLeon Springs State Park Spring of healing waters Hours are 8 a.m. until sunset, 365 days a year. An entrance fee is required. All plants, animals, artifacts and park property are protected. Collection, destruction or disturbance is prohibited. Pets are permitted in designated areas only. Pets must be kept on a leash no longer than 6 feet and well behaved at all times. Fishing, boating, swimming and fires are allowed in designated areas only. A Florida fishing license may be required. Lifeguards are on duty only during the summer months. Swim at your own risk. Fireworks and hunting are prohibited in all Florida state parks. Alcoholic beverage consumption is prohibited. Become a volunteer. Inquire at the ranger station. Florida’s state parks are committed to providing equal access to all facilities and programs. Should you need assistance to enable your participation, please contact the ranger station. Alternate format available upon request at any Florida state park. National Gold Medal Winner Created on 11/16 Florida State Parks - “America’s First Three-Time Winner” Real Fun in Welcome to DeLeon Springs State Park, named for the Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon who sought the Fountain of Youth in the 1500s. Visitors can swim in the beautiful, tranquil spring boil. Lifeguards are available during the summer months. Canoes, kayaks and paddleboats may be rented at the park concession. A boat ramp and boat dock are available. The spring run provides access to the Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge, with 18,000 acres of lakes, creeks and marshes to explore. Fishing for bass and bream is offered from shore or from the fishing pier. A Florida freshwater fishing license is required for people between 16 and 65 years of age. Visitors can hike the half-mile paved nature trail or the 4.2-mile Wild Persimmon trail. Picnic tables are available under oak and pine trees near the spring at tables with grills or in one of the five large pavilions. Breakfast or lunch in the Old Spanish Sugar Mill Restaurant features breads and cook-your own pancakes made from stone-ground flours. Books and gift items are available for purchase. The park offers interpretation of its natural and cultural history through kiosks and exhibits in the visitor center and special events such as a Civil War encampment and annual reenactment of an 1835 Second Seminole War skirmish. CSO and Volunteers - The Friends of DeLeon Springs State Park, Inc. is very active in the park. Volunteers are always needed for events and projects. Directions DeLeon Springs is off U.S. 17 about 6 miles north of Deland. Take I-4 to exit 114; follow Highway 17 north to the town of DeLeon Springs, and look for state park signs. Turn left on Ponce DeLeon Boulevard. Proceed 1 mile (over railroad tracks) straight into the park.
Camping and Cabins Guide Florida State Parks FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks Welcome When the setting sun paints the evening sky, where will you make your bed? Florida’s state parks offer you a variety of overnight accommodations. At a Florida state park, the day’s work is play, a walk on the beach, a hike through the woods, a swim, a bike ride. All you need is a fishing rod, a kayak, a book and a friend. What do you want to see when the sun rises on the new day? Choose a wooded campsite within walking distance of white sandy beaches or camp along the banks of a quietly moving river. Bring your boat or canoe, or fishing tackle and a rod, for a relaxing time with family and friends. Explore nature on the hiking trails, while at the same time leaving stress of the busy world behind. Attend a festival, a reenactment or simply do nothing. We are committed to providing a variety of accessible amenities for all visitors at Florida state parks, including campgrounds and cabins. 2 FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks Family Camping Florida’s state parks offer more than 50 campgrounds statewide for tents, campers and RVs. Most campsites include water, electricity, a grill and picnic table. Centralized showers, restrooms and a dump station are also available. • One responsible person, 18 or older, must be present on each campsite or cabin. • Camping fees vary from park to park and include a maximum of eight people per site, not including children under 6 years old. • Check-in time is 3 p.m. Check-out time is 1 p.m. You are welcome to stay in the park through the end of the day. • Quiet time is from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. • Campsites are limited to two vehicles. Selected campsites may only allow one vehicle. FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks 3 Cabins From modern to rustic, state park cabins provide overnight accommodations in a variety of settings—near beaches, rivers and lakes or peaceful wooded communities. Cabin styles vary from fully equipped modern cabins to hand-hewn, lumber or palm-log retreats. Cabin amenities may include a kitchen, fireplace and screened porch, complete with rocking chairs and porch swings. • Cabins may be reserved for one night during the week, Monday–Thursday, or a minimum of two nights on weekends and holidays, Friday and Saturday, departing Sunday, or Saturday and Sunday, departing Monday. Some exceptions apply. • Cabins can accommodate either four or six visitors. • Check-in time is 4 p.m. Check-out time is 11 a.m. • Quiet time is from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. 4 FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks • Pets are not permitted in cabins or cabin areas. • Staff may assess cabin renters a damage fee if necessary to clean-up or repair any damage beyond ordinary cleaning, wear and tear. Fees may also be charged for lost/stolen items. Group, Primitive, Equestrian and Boat Many parks offer areas for youth and group camping. Backpackers may wish to hike to secluded areas for primitive camping. More than 15 state parks offer campsites and other amenities for equestrians and their horses. Owners of horses visiting state parks must provide proof of a negative Coggins test. Call the park to discuss availability, facilities, rules and fees. Five state parks provide boat slips with water and electricity. Boaters have access to the state park’s restrooms, showers, pump-outs and other amenities. Boaters can also anchor overnight at Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park and at John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park. FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks 5 Camping with Pets and Service Animals Pets are welcome at most Florida State Parks. Some campgrounds have designated sites for pets. All pets must be confined, leashed or otherwise under the physical control of a person at all times. Leashes may not exceed six feet in length. Pets must be well behaved. Owners must pick up after their pets and properly dispose of all pet droppings in trash receptacles. Pets are not permitted on beaches or playgrounds, or in bathing areas, cabins, park buildings or concession facilities. Individual parks may have specific areas prohibiting pets. Service animals in a working capacity are allowed in all public areas of state parks when accompanied by a visitor with a disability. Service animals should be harnessed, leashed or tethered unless such a device interferes with the service animal’s work or the visitor’s disability prevents the use of these devices. 6 FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks Reservations Campsite and cabin reservations may be made from one day to 11 months in advance by calling (800) 326-3521, (866) I CAMP FL or TDD (888) 433-0287 or by visiting FloridaStateParks.ReserveAmerica.com. Call the park directly to reserve group or primitive campsites. Prices per night: Campsites $16 to $42 Cabins $30 to $160 Visitors pay a reservation fee of $6.70 *Prices subject to change. A 50 percent discount on base campsite fees is available to Florida citizens who are 65 years old or older, or Florida c

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