Savannas

Preserve State Park - Florida

Savannas Preserve State Park is located along much of the Atlantic Coast between Fort Pierce and Jensen Beach, Florida. The park is predominantly a savanna; open grasslands with sparse South Florida slash pine trees. The park is made up of pine flatwoods, basin marsh, scrubby flatwoods, wet prairie and the Atlantic scrub ridge. It is home to many species, most notably: the threatened Florida scrub jay and gopher tortoise, the American alligator, and the sandhill crane. The park is also the home to a rare plant that only grows in the Savannas Preserve State Park in the world, the savannas mint.

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Brochure of Savannas Preserve State Park in Florida - the largest freshwater marsh system on Florida’s southeast coast. Published by Florida State Parks.Savannas - Brochure

Brochure of Savannas Preserve State Park in Florida - the largest freshwater marsh system on Florida’s southeast coast. Published by Florida State Parks.

Savannas PSP https://www.floridastateparks.org/parks-and-trails/savannas-preserve-state-park https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Savannas_Preserve_State_Park Savannas Preserve State Park is located along much of the Atlantic Coast between Fort Pierce and Jensen Beach, Florida. The park is predominantly a savanna; open grasslands with sparse South Florida slash pine trees. The park is made up of pine flatwoods, basin marsh, scrubby flatwoods, wet prairie and the Atlantic scrub ridge. It is home to many species, most notably: the threatened Florida scrub jay and gopher tortoise, the American alligator, and the sandhill crane. The park is also the home to a rare plant that only grows in the Savannas Preserve State Park in the world, the savannas mint.
SAVANNAS PRESERVE STATE PARK HISTORY & NATURE The Savannas is comprised of thirteen natural communities: pine flatwoods, wet prairie, basin marsh, marsh lake, sand pine scrub and scrubby flatwoods. Each community is characterized by a distinct population of plants and animals that are naturally associated with each other and their physical environment. Of particular interest is the sand pine scrub, a globally imperiled plant community covering the eastern boundary of the park. It is dominated by sand pines and is home to the Florida scrub-jay and gopher tortoise. Rare plant species, like the prickly apple cactus, Lakela’s mint and four-petal pawpaw, dot the landscape. The basin marsh covers nearly 1,500 acres. The landscape changes dramatically with the rainfall as does the wildlife that lives here. The deeper marsh lakes provide habitat for largemouth bass, alligators, waterfowl and bald eagles. Archaeological evidence suggests native occupation of the area approximately 7,000 years ago. These native peoples inhabited the Atlantic Ridge, relying on the rich fauna and flora of the nearby Indian River. During the Second Seminole War (1835-1842), Lt. Colonel Benjamin Pierce first used the term ‘savannah’ to describe a series of ponds and marshes found here. In 1879, Captain Thomas Richards planted the first pineapples, grown from cuttings he transported from Key West. The plants thrived in the sandy, well-drained soils and dozens of plantations appeared along the Atlantic Ridge. African Americans and Bahamians provided plantation labor working the fields in extremely uncomfortable conditions. From 1895 to 1920, Jensen Beach was known as the “Pineapple Capital of the World.” 2541 Walton Road Port St. Lucie, FL 34952 772-398-2779 www.friendsofsavannas.org PARK GUIDELINES Please remember these tips and guidelines, and enjoy your visit: • • • • • • • • • • Hours are 8 a.m. until sunset, 365 days a year. The Education Center is open 9 a.m. until 5 p.m., Thursday through Monday An entrance fee is required. All plants, animals and park property are protected. Collection, destruction or disturbance is prohibited. Pets are permitted in designated areas only. Pets must be kept on a leash no longer than 6 feet and well behaved at all times. Equestrian activities are prohibited on the Atlantic Coastal Ridge due to the sensitivity of this endangered natural community. Only electric outboard motors are permitted in designated areas. Fireworks and hunting are prohibited in all Florida State Parks. Alcoholic beverage are not allowed. Inquire at the Education Center to volunteer. SAVANNAS PRESERVE STATE PARK Florida’s state parks are committed to providing equal access to all facilities and programs. Should you need assistance to enable your participation, please contact the Education Center at 772-398-2779. Visit us online at FloridaStateParks.org Follow us on social media FloridaStateParks.org #FLStateParks Largest freshwater marsh system on Florida’s southeast coast Savannas Preserve State Park Edwards Road N Indian River Lagoon Aquatic Preserves Field Office South 25th Street EXPERIENCES AND AMENITIES Canoe Launch Easy Street Education Center Ankona Fishing Indian River Hiking Trailhead Equestrian Trail Parking v Dri Picnic Area e 00241_Rev_12.18 Hutchinson Island er The Park entrance at Jensen Beach Boulevard is the southernmost trailhead and offers park visitors a leisurely 1.5 mile hike to the marsh overlook. It has a picnic pavilion and restroom facilities. White City Canoeing Riv North Fork St. Lucie River Pavilion Restrooms Trailhead Wildlife Viewing Walton Walton Road Port St. Lucie Park Boundary Office Education Center r Park Road Unstabilized Hiking Trail Multi-use Trail Park Boundary Rive Park Road Stabilized Legend ucie From the Walton Road entrance, hikers, bicyclists and horseback riders share more than 8.5 miles of multi-use trails. An equestrian area, located off nearby Scenic Park Drive, can easily accommodate trailers with plenty of space to unload horses. Biking ian Numerous interpretive activities are available to school groups and park visitors, including guided walks and kayak/canoe trips. Kayaking and canoeing are good ways to explore the Savannas, water levels permitting. A launching area is located .75 miles from the Education Center and affords visitors easy access to the basin marsh. A second launching area is located at the Evans Creek area on U.S. 1, offering visitors access to North Fork of the St. Lucie River. A small picnic pavilion and environmentallyfriendly restroom are located nearby. For additional information, or to reserve a tour, please call the Education Center at 772-398-2779. d Ind Begin by visiting the Education Center located off Walton Road. The award-winning facility features interactive exhibits and displays on local history, the preserve’s natural communities, plant and animal species and how the Florida Park Service is
Camping and Cabins Guide Florida State Parks FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks Welcome When the setting sun paints the evening sky, where will you make your bed? Florida’s state parks offer you a variety of overnight accommodations. At a Florida state park, the day’s work is play, a walk on the beach, a hike through the woods, a swim, a bike ride. All you need is a fishing rod, a kayak, a book and a friend. What do you want to see when the sun rises on the new day? Choose a wooded campsite within walking distance of white sandy beaches or camp along the banks of a quietly moving river. Bring your boat or canoe, or fishing tackle and a rod, for a relaxing time with family and friends. Explore nature on the hiking trails, while at the same time leaving stress of the busy world behind. Attend a festival, a reenactment or simply do nothing. We are committed to providing a variety of accessible amenities for all visitors at Florida state parks, including campgrounds and cabins. 2 FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks Family Camping Florida’s state parks offer more than 50 campgrounds statewide for tents, campers and RVs. Most campsites include water, electricity, a grill and picnic table. Centralized showers, restrooms and a dump station are also available. • One responsible person, 18 or older, must be present on each campsite or cabin. • Camping fees vary from park to park and include a maximum of eight people per site, not including children under 6 years old. • Check-in time is 3 p.m. Check-out time is 1 p.m. You are welcome to stay in the park through the end of the day. • Quiet time is from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. • Campsites are limited to two vehicles. Selected campsites may only allow one vehicle. FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks 3 Cabins From modern to rustic, state park cabins provide overnight accommodations in a variety of settings—near beaches, rivers and lakes or peaceful wooded communities. Cabin styles vary from fully equipped modern cabins to hand-hewn, lumber or palm-log retreats. Cabin amenities may include a kitchen, fireplace and screened porch, complete with rocking chairs and porch swings. • Cabins may be reserved for one night during the week, Monday–Thursday, or a minimum of two nights on weekends and holidays, Friday and Saturday, departing Sunday, or Saturday and Sunday, departing Monday. Some exceptions apply. • Cabins can accommodate either four or six visitors. • Check-in time is 4 p.m. Check-out time is 11 a.m. • Quiet time is from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. 4 FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks • Pets are not permitted in cabins or cabin areas. • Staff may assess cabin renters a damage fee if necessary to clean-up or repair any damage beyond ordinary cleaning, wear and tear. Fees may also be charged for lost/stolen items. Group, Primitive, Equestrian and Boat Many parks offer areas for youth and group camping. Backpackers may wish to hike to secluded areas for primitive camping. More than 15 state parks offer campsites and other amenities for equestrians and their horses. Owners of horses visiting state parks must provide proof of a negative Coggins test. Call the park to discuss availability, facilities, rules and fees. Five state parks provide boat slips with water and electricity. Boaters have access to the state park’s restrooms, showers, pump-outs and other amenities. Boaters can also anchor overnight at Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park and at John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park. FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks 5 Camping with Pets and Service Animals Pets are welcome at most Florida State Parks. Some campgrounds have designated sites for pets. All pets must be confined, leashed or otherwise under the physical control of a person at all times. Leashes may not exceed six feet in length. Pets must be well behaved. Owners must pick up after their pets and properly dispose of all pet droppings in trash receptacles. Pets are not permitted on beaches or playgrounds, or in bathing areas, cabins, park buildings or concession facilities. Individual parks may have specific areas prohibiting pets. Service animals in a working capacity are allowed in all public areas of state parks when accompanied by a visitor with a disability. Service animals should be harnessed, leashed or tethered unless such a device interferes with the service animal’s work or the visitor’s disability prevents the use of these devices. 6 FloridaStateParks.org • #FLStateParks Reservations Campsite and cabin reservations may be made from one day to 11 months in advance by calling (800) 326-3521, (866) I CAMP FL or TDD (888) 433-0287 or by visiting FloridaStateParks.ReserveAmerica.com. Call the park directly to reserve group or primitive campsites. Prices per night: Campsites $16 to $42 Cabins $30 to $160 Visitors pay a reservation fee of $6.70 *Prices subject to change. A 50 percent discount on base campsite fees is available to Florida citizens who are 65 years old or older, or Florida c

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