Fort Yargo

Trail Map

brochure Fort Yargo - Trail Map

Trail map for Fort Yargo State Park (SP) in Georgia. Published by Georgia State Parks & Historic Sites.

Fort Yargo State Park Trail Map M L U EXIT T N A Bird Berry Trail O (Special Needs Groups Only) I P B H Q R S A to U F D C G Trail contin ues to Barrow Co. Rec. Dept. Wooden Trail Posts E 210 S. Broad Street, Winder, Georgia 30680 • 770-867-3489 • Reservations: 800-864-7275 • Emergency: 911 • GaStateParks.org K J (No fast riding. Bikers yield to hikers.) (No fast riding. Bikers yield to hikers.) HIKING & BIKING TRAILS SAFETY TIPS & ETIQUETTE • Tell someone your itinerary and expected return time. Bird Berry Trail (yellow blazes) ½ mile round-trip, easy This historical park features a log fort built in 1792 by settlers for protection against Creek and Cherokee Indians. Located between Atlanta and Athens, Fort Yargo offers a fun camping, hiking and fishing experience for families. The park surrounds Marbury Creek Reservoir, a 260-acre lake with a swimming beach, fishing areas and boat ramps. Many campsites are near the water’s edge, and hiking/ biking trails follow the lake shore. ACTIVITIES & FACILITIES • Camping – The park provides 40 tent and trailer sites with water and electrical hook-ups, and 12 walk-in sites. There are two comfort stations and dump stations. • Cottages – There are three cottages. Cottage #3 is dog friendly and requires a pet fee per dog and a maximum of two dogs. • Yurts – There are six yurts which are like canvas and wood tents with decks, a picnic table and grill/fire ring. • Picnicking – Designated picnic areas are located throughout the park. Tables are available on a firstcome, first-served basis. Seven shelters are reservable and are available on a first-come, first-served basis at other times. • Group Facilities – Two group shelters (enclosed and open air) include kitchens, grills and chairs for 80 to 100 people. The Lake Pavilion and Beach Pavilion both have lake views. These may be reserved 13 months in advance. • Fishing – Marbury Creek Watershed is open for fishing year-round. Persons age 16 or older must have a valid fishing license. • Boating – Boats up to 10-horsepower are permitted on the lake. Canoes, fishing boats and pedal boats are available for rent seasonally. All boating ends at sunset. • Swimming – A beach and bathhouse are located on the lake. Swim at your own risk. • Disc Golf – This activity is similar to regular golf which involves throwing Frisbee-style discs into metal baskets. • Miniature Golf – A miniature golf course is located near the beach. • Hiking and Bicycling – More than 20 miles of trails run through the park. • Take a map, water, snacks, first aid kit, flashlight and whistle. Three short blasts on a whistle are known as a call for help. This short, paved trail features a birding area, nature signs and gazebo. Originally constructed to allow physically challenged visitors to access a nature trail, it is suitable for wheelchairs and strollers. A birding platform near the lake’s edge allows visitors to watch for great blue heron, green heron, redwing blackbirds, Canada geese, wood thrush and occasionally white egrets. 23 signs with text and Braille teach about native flora and fauna, such as deer, rabbits, raccoons and loblolly pine. • Do not stray from trails. If you become lost, stay in one location and wait for help. This will make it easier for rescuers to find you. • Don’t count on cell phones to work in the wilderness, but if they do, be able to give details about your location. Mountain Bike Loop (blue blazes) 12-mile loop, moderate to difficult This popular mountain bike loop travels 12 miles around the park’s perimeter and is best suited for experienced riders. Hikers are discouraged on this trail due to the speed of some bikers. The mostly single-track trail features intermediate climbs and downhills, with views of the lake, wetlands, creeks, a power-line clearing and wooded ridges. Portions of the trail are bumpy due to roots. Direction travels clockwise on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday, switching to counter-clockwise on other days. The trail is occasionally used for races and triathlons. Access this trail from the park’s nature center or Area B. Boxed areas on the map highlight the most memorable sections of this trail. - Heart Attack Hill - This challeging section will get blood pumping as riders climb, twist and descend a beautiful hillside above the lake. - Horseshoe Drop - Experienced bikers can test their skills on this horseshoe-shaped, double ten-foot drop through a drainage ditch. - Cemetary Hill - This steady climb leads to the Hill Family Cemetary dating back to the 1800s. - Deadwood Hill - This section of trail is littered with dead and dying trees due to lightning and disease. This makes for an interesting ride, twisting and turning through trees on the ground and those still standing. - Monster Mile - Advanced riders will enjoy this one-mile section with climbs, tight turns and steep descents. Riders cross a creek twice on this undeveloped side of the park. - 3-Step Hill - Old farming terraces make for a fun ride on the downhill and a quick, three-step climb on the uphill. • Invest in good hiking socks such as those found at sporting goods stores. Avoid blisters by carrying “moleskin” and applying it as soon as you feel hot spots on your feet. Available in the foot care section of drug stores, moleskin is like felt that sticks to your skin. • Be prepared for unexpected rain and wind which can lead to hypothermia. Always carry quality rain gear and turn back in bad weather. If you become wet or cold, it is important to get dry and warm as quickly as possible. Lake Loop Trail (yellow blazes) 7-mile loop, easy to moderate This relatively flat trail travels 7 miles around the lake and is open to both foot traffic and bicycles. Bikers should yield to hikers. The trail hugs the shoreline in many locations, offering good wildlife viewing. Riders may see white-tailed deer, squirrels, rabbits, raccoons and turtles. It also travels into wooded uplands for different views of plants and trees. Although it looks like an easy walk around the lake, the distance can be deceiving. Be prepared for three to four hours of walking if traveling the entire 7-mile loop. Winder Connecting Trail (green blazes) 1.2-miles one way, easy to moderate This access point to our hiking and biking trails begins at the Barrow County Recreation Department on Second Street. Visitors can access the trail which will lead to a grocery store, shopping center and many restaurants nearby. MOUNTAIN BIKE LOOP ELEVATION GRAPH (Clockwise from Lake Pavilion parking area.) • Dress in layers and avoid cotton. Today’s hikers can choose from numerous fabrics that wick moisture, dry quickly and conserve heat. Many experienced hikers wear a lightweight shirt that wicks moisture, while carrying a fleece pullover and rain jacket. • Pack out all trash. • Keep pets on a leash at all times and clean up after them. • Do not pick flowers, disturb wildlife or take anything off the park. • Protect the park and help prevent erosion by staying on marked trails. CLIMATE DATA FOR WINDER, GEORGIA Avg. Month High Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 50ºF 55ºF 63ºF 72ºF 79ºF 85ºF 88ºF 87ºF 81ºF 71ºF 62ºF 53ºF Avg. Low Mean Avg. Precip. Record High Record Low 31ºF 32ºF 39ºF 45ºF 54ºF 63ºF 67ºF 66ºF 60ºF 49ºF 40ºF 33ºF 5.32 in 4.39 in 5.48 in 3.87 in 3.94 in 3.78 in 4.02 in 3.71 in 3.98 in 3.74 in 3.63 in 3.77 in -8ºF(1985) -1ºF (1958) 5ºF (1980) 24ºF (1982) 33ºF (1963) 40ºF (1972) 51ºF (1980) 52ºF (1964) 34ºF (1967) 24ºF (1962) 13ºF (1970) -4ºF (1962) 40ºF 44ºF 51ºF 58ºF 66ºF 74ºF 77ºF 76ºF 71ºF 60ºF 51ºF 43ºF 80ºF (2002) 79ºF (1989) 87ºF (1974) 94ºF (1986) 97ºF (1962) 101ºF (1964) 104ºF (1983) 103ºF (1983) 100ºF (1957) 89ºF (2002) 87ºF (1961) 76ºF (1991)

also available

National Parks
USFS NW