"Johnson Creek, Upper Raft River Valley, Albion Range" by Intermountain Forest Service, USDA Region 4 Photography , public domain

Sawtooth - Minidoka

National Forest - ID,UT

Sawtooth National Forest is located mostly in Idaho (96%) and Utah (4%). It is divided in 4 ranger districts: Sawtooth NRA, Fairfield, Ketchum, and Minidoka. The Minidoka District is separated from the rest of the forest by the Snake River Plain, also known as Idaho's potato belt; snowmelt from the forest provides a steady supply of water to the plain. The Minidoka District is a part of the Basin and Range Province. Rocky Mountain juniper and the occasional cactus plant can be found here. In these pinyon-juniper woodlands trees also include singleleaf pinyon, Utah juniper, and curl-leaf mountain mahogany. Idaho's rarest plant, the Christ's Indian paintbrush, is endemic to 200 acres (81 ha) on upper elevations of Mount Harrison in the Albion Mountains. Davis' springparsley is also endemic to the Albion Mountains. dditionally, the forest contains potential habitat for the threatened Ute lady's tresses.

maps

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Eastern Part - Albion, Black Pine, Raft River & Sublett Divisions - of Minidoka Ranger District in Sawtooth National Forest (NF) in Idaho and Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,Sawtooth MVUM - Minidoka East 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Eastern Part - Albion, Black Pine, Raft River & Sublett Divisions - of Minidoka Ranger District in Sawtooth National Forest (NF) in Idaho and Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Cassia Division of Minidoka Ranger District in Sawtooth National Forest (NF) in Idaho. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,Sawtooth MVUM - Minidoka Cassia 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Cassia Division of Minidoka Ranger District in Sawtooth National Forest (NF) in Idaho. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).,

Map of Magic Mountain Nordic Ski Trails in Sawtooth National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Sawtooth - Magic Mountain Nordic Ski Trails

Map of Magic Mountain Nordic Ski Trails in Sawtooth National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of South Hills Single Track System in Indaho. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).South Hills - Trails Map

Map of South Hills Single Track System in Indaho. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Sawtooth NF - Minidoka https://www.fs.usda.gov/sawtooth https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sawtooth_National_Forest Sawtooth National Forest is located mostly in Idaho (96%) and Utah (4%). It is divided in 4 ranger districts: Sawtooth NRA, Fairfield, Ketchum, and Minidoka. The Minidoka District is separated from the rest of the forest by the Snake River Plain, also known as Idaho's potato belt; snowmelt from the forest provides a steady supply of water to the plain. The Minidoka District is a part of the Basin and Range Province. Rocky Mountain juniper and the occasional cactus plant can be found here. In these pinyon-juniper woodlands trees also include singleleaf pinyon, Utah juniper, and curl-leaf mountain mahogany. Idaho's rarest plant, the Christ's Indian paintbrush, is endemic to 200 acres (81 ha) on upper elevations of Mount Harrison in the Albion Mountains. Davis' springparsley is also endemic to the Albion Mountains. dditionally, the forest contains potential habitat for the threatened Ute lady's tresses.
S awtooth National Forest VISITOR GUIDE oulton) ntains (© Mark M White Cloud Mou Includes the Sawtooth National Recreation Area Bull elk (© Wesle y Aston) What’s Inside Stanley Basin (© Mark Moulton) T Fast Forest he Sawtooth National Forest is a place of inspiring beauty and contrasting landscapes. National forest lands stretch from the “basin and range” of northern Utah to the lofty peaks of the Idaho Rockies and the headwaters of the legendary “River of No Return.” This diversity is coupled with a contrast in seasons creating winter wonders and summer “scene-sations.” Facts Elevation Range: 4,514’–12,009’ Acres: 2.1 million Alpine ski areas: 4 (27 lifts/138 runs) Unique features: • Largest whitebark pine in North America • Only population on the planet of Christ’s Indian Paintbrush • Clearest air (Sawtooth Wilderness) and longest salmon migration in the in the continental U.S. Get to Know Us ................. 2 Special Places ...................... 3 Sawtooth NRA .................... 4 Watchable Wildlife .......... 6 Scenic Byways .................... 7 Map ......................................... 8 Campgrounds ..................... 12 Winter Recreation ........... 14 Trails .......................................15 Activities ............................... 16 Know Before You Go........18 Contact Information ........ 20 The forest is home for deer, elk, mountain goats, and bighorn sheep. Gray wolves, wolverines, black bear, salmon, and many species of birds also thrive here. Trails, campgrounds, Wilderness, rivers, and scenic drives give visitors plenty of opportunities to connect with this special land. As an added gem, the forest also includes the Sawtooth National Recreation Area, commonly referred to as the “Heart of Idaho”. Come see for yourself! This Visitor Guide provides the information you need to make the most of your Sawtooth National Forest experience. G et to Know Us History T he first people to use the lands that are now the Sawtooth National Forest occupied this area between 8,000–7,000 BC. More recently (after 1,700 AD) the Shoshone—or Sheepeater people—lived in small bands on the northern end of the forest, harvesting roots and tubers, fish and game, and timber and rocks for tools. Historic barn in Lowe r Stanley (© Ed Cannady) 10 Shoshone, circa 1880-19 Trappers and explorers arrived in southern Idaho by the early 19th century and by 1849 immigrant trails were established through the southern end of the forest. Mining in Idaho started in the early 1860s and peaked in the 1880s, occasionally rebounding over the next 100 years. Cattle and sheep grazing was the primary large-scale land use on the forest for much of the 20th century. Logging activities focused on timber and firewood for homesteaders and miners. It wasn’t long before the area became popular with visitors who were drawn by the impressive scenery and recreational opportunities. The Minidoka and Sawtooth National Forests were established in 1905 by President Teddy Roosevelt and merged in 1953 as the Sawtooth National Forest. © Mark Moulton The Area The Sawtooth National Forest has two distinct geographic units separated by the Snake River Plain— Idaho’s “potato belt”—which relies on the forest for the water it needs to irrigate this important agricultural region. South of the Snake River Plain, the forest is part of the basin and range geologic province of western Utah, Nevada and southeastern Idaho. Here, a series of north-to-south faults break the country into mountain ranges separated by continuously widening basins. The climate Wolverine (© Wendy Nero) is desert-like, but the ranges capture snow, storing the moisture for later release into the surrounding basins of the Snake River Plain. Lower elevations host sagebrush and juniper that blend into aspen, lodgepole pine, and fir at higher elevations. Mule deer, elk, pronghorn, and sage grouse are common on this part of the forest. Two-thirds of the forest lies north of the Snake River Plain, where towering granite mountains are sliced by unfathomable rivers. These mountains are actually part of five ranges—the Sawtooth, Boulder, White Cloud, Smoky, and Pioneer, which are part of the famous Idaho Batholith. High alpine lakes abound in this rugged country. Rivers are lined with colossal cottonwoods and graceful willows. The uplands are blanketed with lodgepole pine, and Douglas and alpine fir, interspersed with whitebark pine and meadows strewn with wildflowers in the summer. Wildlife is plentiful with elk, deer, mountain goats, wolverines, wolves, black bear, cougars, and a wide variety of birds including sandhill cranes, osprey, and eagles. With the exception of the grizzly bear, just about every species that was here in the days of Lewis and Clark is still here today. Sawtooth Mountains (© Mark Moulton) The vast resources of the Sawtooth National Forest belong to all Americans. These resources must rely on the stewardship of all of us if the

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