Blue Mounds

State Park - Minnesota

Blue Mounds State Park is located near the town of Luverne in Minnesota. It protects an American bison herd which grazes on one of the state's largest prairie remnants. The state park is named after a linear escarpment of Precambrian Sioux Quartzite bedrock, which although pink in color, is said to have appeared blueish in the distance to early settlers. Parts of the cliff are up to 100 feet (30 m) high. Unusual in the surrounding prairie landscape, they are a popular site for rock climbing.

maps

Visitor Map of Blue Mounds State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).Blue Mounds - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Blue Mounds State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).

South West Quad of the Snowmobile Trails Map of Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).Minnesota Snowmobile Trails - South West Quad

South West Quad of the Snowmobile Trails Map of Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).

Recreation Basemap of Sioux Falls in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).Minnesota Recreation - Sioux Falls

Recreation Basemap of Sioux Falls in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).

brochures

Visitor Map of Blue Mounds State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).Blue Mounds - Map and Guide

Visitor Map of Blue Mounds State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).

Map and Guide of Climbing Areas at Blue Mounds State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).Blue Mounds - Climbing Areas

Map and Guide of Climbing Areas at Blue Mounds State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).

Blue Mounds SP https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/state_parks/park.html?id=spk00121#homepage https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Mounds_State_Park Blue Mounds State Park is located near the town of Luverne in Minnesota. It protects an American bison herd which grazes on one of the state's largest prairie remnants. The state park is named after a linear escarpment of Precambrian Sioux Quartzite bedrock, which although pink in color, is said to have appeared blueish in the distance to early settlers. Parts of the cliff are up to 100 feet (30 m) high. Unusual in the surrounding prairie landscape, they are a popular site for rock climbing.
©2020, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources MAP AND GUIDE: BLUE MOUNDS STATE PARK 1410 161ST STREET LUVERNE, MN 56156 ROCK COUNTY 507-283-6050 VISITOR TIPS • Bison can move very fast. Keep out of the enclosure fence! • Don’t see bison from the viewing platform? Check the southwestern corner of the range from Mound or Western Loop trails. • Stay on trails. Prickly pear cacti are common here and their spines can pierce shoes and clothes. Even their yellow flowers have small spines. • Pack a water bottle for your hike. • In an emergency call 911. • Non-emergency sheriff’s number: 507-283-5000 ONLY HAVE AN HOUR? • Look for bison from the viewing platform or Mound Trail. • Hike the short Quarry Trail to explore the quartzite cliffs. • Visit Eagle Rock, the park’s highest point. Take the Mound Trail from the Eagle Rock Vista parking lot. LOOKING FOR MORE TO EXPLORE? VISIT MNDNR.GOV/BLUEMOUNDS SO EVERYONE CAN ENJOY THE PARK... ABOUT THE PARK Established in 1961, Blue Mounds State Park protects sheer quartzite cliffs and over 1,500 acres of highly diverse prairie. Here you have the opportunity to see more rare prairie species than in any other park in southwestern Minnesota. Management programs restore native grasses and wildflowers, resulting in a panorama of prairie colors in late summer. Amid this rich landscape, you may also spot bison. The herd you see today began with the introduction of three bison from Nebraska in 1961. New calves are born each spring. A FULL SET OF STATE PARK RULES AND REGULATIONS IS AVAILABLE AT MNDNR.GOV. PARK OPEN 8 a.m.–10 p.m. daily. VEHICLE PERMITS Permits required; purchase at park office or entrance kiosk. PETS WELCOME − TRAIL HIGHLIGHTS Bur Oak Trail 0.75 miles one-way Steep terrain • Bare rock • Packed dirt This narrow trail leads through a bur oak forest and large quartzite boulders and cliff faces. Mound Trail 1.5-miles one-way One long, gradual hill • Mowed grass Hike along the western edge of the bison range and over the top of the Mound. You’ll be rewarded with abundant views of tallgrass prairie. Loops can be made by returning on the Upper Cliffline Trail. Upper Cliffline Trail 1.5-miles one-way One long, gradual hill • Mowed grass Travel along the upper edge of the cliffline and old quartzite quarry to experience the unique, pink rock. Lower Cliffline Trail 1-miles one-way Mostly flat • Mowed grass • Some paved segments Take this trail to skirt around the base of a cliffline and join the bike trail. Connecting trails lead up the cliff to the Upper Cliffline Trail. MORE TO EXPLORE AT THE PARK • Bike along three miles of paved park trails and continue onto trails that lead to Luverne, MN. • Bring your own gear and go rock climbing. Keep on 6-foot leash; pick up after; attend at all times; not allowed in buildings. Experience a stunning prairie landscape. • Stay overnight in a park tipi. This is a popular option, so make a reservation well in advance. CAMPGROUND QUIET HOURS 10 p.m.– 8 a.m.; only registered campers may be in campground during quiet hours. FIREWOOD Must be purchased at this park or from vendors who sell wood approved for this park; no gathering firewood in the park. BE OUR GUEST Reserve electric or non-electric campsites, cart-in campsites, a tipi or a group campsite. Visit mndnr.gov/reservations. MORE INFORMATION Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Information Center 500 Lafayette Rd. , St. Paul, MN 55155-4040 888-646-6367 or mndnr.gov/parks The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is an Equal Opportunity Employer. This information may be available in alternative format upon request.
BLUE MOUNDS STATE PARK Climbing Areas You are climbing on Sioux Quartzite One of Minnesota’s hardest rocks, it resists erosion and preserves nearly two billion years of history. Sioux Quartzite’s story began when rivers moved grains of sand, eroded from Earth’s most ancient crust, into piles. The pink, purple and red colors come from iron in the water. Blobs of bacteria, among the earliest life on the planet, lived in these wet sand piles and left white circles still visible today. With heat and time, the sand cemented into sandstone, and eventually baked into quartzite. Over one and a half billion years later, thick glacial ice scraped and scoured the quartzite, leaving cuts and grooves in the stone, and a blanket of gravel, sand, and clay over the landscape. Cycles of freezing and thawing peeled pieces of the stone away, creating boulders and cliffs for us to climb on. *Please refer to guidebooks for more details* BLUE MOUNDS STATE PARK Climbing Information mndnr.gov/bluemounds Warning and Liability Disclaimer Rock climbing is a dangerous activity. Please seek competent instruction and develop good skills before climbing on your own. The State of Minnesota does not certify climbers, instructors or guides, or otherwise determine their qualifications. It does not rate climbing locations, routes or conditions, or determine their safety. The State of Minnesota is not liable if a climber is hurt or killed while climbing in Minnesota State Parks. If individuals choose to climb, they do so at their own risk. Climb in designated areas only. Check park kiosks or online for current closures. Climbing Permits Are Free and Last for One Year Climbing areas are restricted by Minnesota State Park Rules (6100.1355 (8) Rock Climbing), and climbing is allowed by permit only. Permits are free and are good for one calendar year. Individuals may obtain a permit at the park office or climbers parking lot self-registration station. You need a permit from each park where you climb. Organized groups need a commercial climbing permit to climb in Minnesota State Parks. Organized groups include, but are not limited to: schools, camps and businesses that provide instruction or guiding to climbers. Permits for groups require insurance certification and at least one week’s notice to authorize the permit. Contact the park office to obtain application materials. Safety: Please Heed Postings Routes with closed signs are closed for a reason, usually due to unsafe conditions or sensitive natural resources. Respect the postings and give the area a wide berth. Please report any potential safety hazard to park staff. Rocky crags and cracks are prime habitat for insects, bats and snakes. While some may sting or bite if grabbed by mistake, they are a vital resource and should be left alone. There are no venomous snakes in this park. Ethics Promote Safety and Advancement of the Sport Rock climbing puts climbers in direct contact with other park visitors. For your safety and the advancement of the sport, practice good climbing ethics, including the following examples: Keep climbs available - Do not leave climbing equipment unattended to reserve a climb. Park policy allows park rangers to move unattended equipment. During periods of high use, please free up climbs and share them with other climbers. Climbing Anchors - Minnesota State Parks strongly endorse a "clean climbing" philosophy. In all but very limited, pre-approved instances, placement of hardware will be limited to that which can be temporarily placed using the climber’s fingers. All such protection must be placed and removed without altering the rock. Chalk - If you must use chalk, use a neutral color. Brush holds clean before leaving an area. Pets - Pets are welcome in Minnesotas state parks, as long as they are kept on a leash six feet or shorter and are personally attended at all times. Please do not tie pets up along pathways and leave unattended while you climb. Plants - Do not remove vegetation from climbs. Trash and Graf fiti - Keep the park clean and pack out trash. Inform park staff of any graffiti in the climbing area so that it can be removed. Trails - Use established trails when accessing climbs to keep you safe and to prevent erosion. 2017, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources This guide is published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, 500 Lafayette Road, St. Paul, MN 55155-4040. Phone: 651-296-6157, 888-MINNDNR. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is an equal opportunity employer. This document is available in alternative formats to individuals with disabilities.

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