Jay Cooke

State Park - Minnesota

Jay Cooke State Park is located about 10 miles (16 km) southwest of Duluth, Minnesota. The park protects the lower reaches of the Saint Louis River. The western half of the park contains part of a rocky, 13-mile (21 km) gorge. This was a major barrier to Native Americans and early Europeans traveling by canoe, which they bypassed with the challenging Grand Portage of the St. Louis River. The river was a vital link connecting the Mississippi waterways to the west with the Great Lakes to the east.

maps

Summer Visitor Map of Jay Cooke State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).Jay Cooke - Summer Map

Summer Visitor Map of Jay Cooke State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).

Winter Visitor Map of Jay Cooke State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).Jay Cooke - Winter Map

Winter Visitor Map of Jay Cooke State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).

North East Quad of the Snowmobile Trails Map of Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).Minnesota Snowmobile Trails - North East Quad

North East Quad of the Snowmobile Trails Map of Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).

Recreation Basemap of Duluth in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).Minnesota Recreation - Duluth

Recreation Basemap of Duluth in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).

brochures

Summer Map of Jay Cooke State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).Jay Cooke - Summer Map and Guide

Summer Map of Jay Cooke State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).

Map of Fat Bike Trails at Jay Cooke State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).Jay Cooke - Fat Bike Trails

Map of Fat Bike Trails at Jay Cooke State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).

River Inn Visitor Center and Campground Map of Jay Cooke State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).Jay Cooke - Visitor Center and Campground Map

River Inn Visitor Center and Campground Map of Jay Cooke State Park (SP) in Minnesota. Published by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR).

Jay Cooke SP https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/state_parks/park.html?id=spk00187#homepage https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Cooke_State_Park Jay Cooke State Park is located about 10 miles (16 km) southwest of Duluth, Minnesota. The park protects the lower reaches of the Saint Louis River. The western half of the park contains part of a rocky, 13-mile (21 km) gorge. This was a major barrier to Native Americans and early Europeans traveling by canoe, which they bypassed with the challenging Grand Portage of the St. Louis River. The river was a vital link connecting the Mississippi waterways to the west with the Great Lakes to the east.
MAP AND GUIDE: JAY COOKE STATE PARK 780 HIGHWAY 210 CARLTON, MN 55718 CARLTON COUNTY 218-673-7000 JAYCOOKE.STATEPARK@STATE.MN.US VISITOR TIPS • Wear good hiking shoes and bring plenty of water. • The beautiful St. Louis River is rocky with steep cliffs and unpredictable water flows. • Cellular communications are not always reliable in the park. • Watch for ticks and poison ivy. • Keep wildlife wild. Do not feed or approach animals. • In an emergency call 911. • Non-emergency sheriff’s number: 218-384-4185. ONLY HAVE AN HOUR? • Park at the historic River Inn and set out on the iconic Swinging Bridge which sways above the St. Louis River. This route is accessible to all. • Visit Oldenburg Point for Civilian Conservation Corps structures and glorious views over the St. Louis River valley. • Visit the Thomson Pioneer Cemetery which dates back to the late 1800s. ABOUT THE PARK SO EVERYONE CAN ENJOY THE PARK... The park was established in 1915 with a donation of land from the St. Louis River Power Company. Today, the park protects nearly 9,000 acres of forests and streams that surround the water-eroded gorge, steep valleys and rock formations of the St. Louis River, Lake Superior’s largest tributary in the United States. Millions of years of dramatic geologic events, including volcanic activity, glaciation and plate tectonics, formed the unique rock you experience here. The area also has a rich human history. Dakota and Ojibwe Indians, French fur-traders, railways, hydropower companies, and the Civilian Conservation Corps all left impressions you may notice as you explore. The stunning landscape hosts a healthy ecosystem. Walk quietly, listen and look, and you may find some of the diverse wildlife that rely on the park’s varied habitat. Watch for white-tailed deer, black bears, timber wolves, an abundance of birds, and more. A FULL SET OF STATE PARK RULES AND REGULATIONS IS AVAILABLE AT MNDNR.GOV. 8 a.m.–10 p.m. daily. VEHICLE PERMITS Permits required; purchase at park office or entrance kiosk. PETS WELCOME Keep on leash; pick up after; attend at all times; not allowed in buildings or beaches. Cross the St. Louis River on a bridge built by the Civilian Conservation Corps. − CAMPGROUND QUIET HOURS 10 p.m.– 8 a.m.; only registered campers may be in campground during quiet hours. FIREWOOD TRAIL HIGHLIGHTS Silver Creek Trail (Hiking Club Trail) 3.5-mile loop Some hills • Mowed Grass • Bare rock Cross the Swinging Bridge, climb a short section of rock, and follow a wide grassy route through birch and basswood trees. Enjoy views of the St. Louis River and Silver Creek. In spring, watch for blooming yellow lady’s-slippers. Part of this route is shared with segments of the Superior Hiking Trail and North Country Trail. Carlton Trail Trip 5-mile loop Steep • Rugged terrain • Bare rock • Packed Dirt • Narrow Hike this rugged route for spectacular views of the St. Louis River. The path briefly joins the paved Willard Munger State Trail. You may then return on the easier Thomson and CCC trails, passing through a pioneer cemetery and shaded forest along the way. CCC Trail 1.8-mile loop Mostly flat • Mowed grass • Wide From behind the River Inn, take an easy stroll and stop at benches near scenic points along the St. Louis River. Then, head into the forest to look for signs of wildlife or listen for diverse bird species. Prefer to save the river views for the end of your trip? Start from the kiosk at the back of the River Inn parking lot instead. Thomson Dam Trip 2 miles one-way Some hills • Paved Bicycle or hike up the Forbay Trail, then follow the Willard Munger State Trail west to a trestle bridge. Lock your bike at the rack and explore the rocky river gorge and dam before returning the way you came. MORE TO EXPLORE AT THE PARK • Join a free naturalist program. LOOKING FOR MORE TO EXPLORE DURING YOUR STAY? VISIT MNDNR.GOV/JAYCOOKE PARK OPEN • Borrow GPS units or birding or fishing kits at the park office. • Visit Hemlock Ravine Scientific and Natural Area. • Cast a line in a designated trout stream. • Look for signs of wildlife on 50 miles of diverse recreational trails that offer opportunities for hiking, horseback riding and mountain biking. • Reserve a cabin, campsite or group camp and stay awhile. Visit mndnr.gov/reservations. Must be purchased at this park or from vendors who sell wood approved for this park; no gathering firewood in the park. SPECIAL RULES • Cliff jumping and swimming is prohibited due to dangerous currents. • Take only photographs. Flowers, driftwood, agates and cultural elements are protected within the park and may not be collected. • Drones are not allowed to land within the park. CURIOUS ABOUT THE WILLARD MUNGER STATE TRAIL? VISIT MNDNR.GOV/STATETRAILS TO LEARN MORE. MORE INFORMATION Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Information Center 500 Lafayette Rd., St. Paul, MN 55155-4040 888-646-6367 or mndnr.gov/parks The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources is an Equal Opportunity
Jay Cooke State Park Fat Bike Information Fat biking safety and weather conditions Fat biking safety tips: • There are inherent risks to fat biking, ride at your own risk • Test the fit and function of your equipment before each ride • Always wear a helmet and appropriate safety gear • Wear bright colored clothing so others can see you • Obey all rules and signs and ride open trails only • Ride with a friend to promote fun and safety • Always yield the trail and let others know you are coming • Be aware of your surroundings and other trail users • Ride to your ability and be in control at all times, remembering that the faster you ride, the greater your risks, so always keep your speed at a level that will allow full control • Do not ride wet or soft trails • Parents should use extreme caution when allowing children to ride. Be aware of winter conditions: • Overcast skies causing "flat light" and white-out blizzards can make it hard to see the trail. In white-out conditions, there are no shadows, horizon or clouds, and all depth perception and orientation may be lost. Riding during this weather is not recommended. • Additionally, "flat light" can obscure features and terrain. Visual references are important for safe riding. Please go slow and use caution in these conditions. • There is no such thing as "safe ice," and ice seldom freezes uniformly. The terrain can greatly change with icy conditions, and the ice may not be uniform. Please use extreme caution. Other fat biking resources • International Mountain Biking Association(IMBA) - imba.com/ - Fat bike best practices - imba.com/resources/land-protection/fat-bikes • Minnesota Off-Road Cyclists (MORC) partners with the Twin Cities metro area park providers on a variety of winter fat biking opportunities morcmtb.org/ • Cyclists of Gitchee Gumee Shores (COGGS) partners with park providers in the Duluth area on winter fat biking opportunities - wp.coggs.com/
RIVER INN VISITOR CENTER AND CAMPGROUND AREA rail T . C C.C. Sites 1-3, 48-63, 81-83 and camper cabins 15 16 17 13 5 11 33 10 14 21 18 GRP2 35 9 20 19 12 37 6 7 23 22 8 5 SLATE BASALT 58 76 71 55e 54 75 69 59e 32 29 53 60 78 67 52e 34 77 28 61e 27 79 62 36 64e 65 51 80 26 50e 63 25 49 24 4 2e 48e 70 38e 47e 46e 40e 1e 41e 45e 66 81 83 44e GABBRO SHALE Electric Site ine White P Information Camper Cabin To 82 43e 42e 68 AGATE 210 Trail 1 Walk-in Site Primitive Group Camp Dumpster Recycle Station RV Sanitation Station River Inn Restroom/Shower Primitive Toilet Drinking Water Firewood is River St. Lou [ e 56 73 30 3e HOST 39e GRP1 57e 72 74 C.C.C. Trail Open Winter Camping [ Swinging Bridge

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