Cedar Island

National Wildlife Refuge - North Carolina

Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge, located in Carteret County, North Carolina, is on the end of a peninsula marking the southern end of Pamlico Sound. The refuge consists of approximately 11,000 acres (45 km2) of irregularly flooded, brackish marsh and 3,480 acres (14.1 km2) of pocosin and woodland habitat. The dominant marsh plants include black needlerush, saltmarsh cordgrass, saltmeadow hay, and saltgrass. The woodland areas are dominated by loblolly, longleaf and pond pine. The marsh and surrounding waters provide wintering habitat for thousands of ducks and nesting habitat for colonial waterbirds. Mammalian species that inhabit this refuge are gray squirrel, marsh rabbit, white-tailed deer, red fox, raccoon, bobcat, gray fox, nutria, beaver, muskrat, river otter, mink and opossum.

maps

Official visitor map of Cape Lookout National Seashore (NS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cape Lookout - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Cape Lookout National Seashore (NS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

brochures

Map of Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Cedar Island - Map

Map of Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Fact Sheet of Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Cedar Island - Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet of Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Cedar Island NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/cedar_island https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cedar_Island_National_Wildlife_Refuge Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge, located in Carteret County, North Carolina, is on the end of a peninsula marking the southern end of Pamlico Sound. The refuge consists of approximately 11,000 acres (45 km2) of irregularly flooded, brackish marsh and 3,480 acres (14.1 km2) of pocosin and woodland habitat. The dominant marsh plants include black needlerush, saltmarsh cordgrass, saltmeadow hay, and saltgrass. The woodland areas are dominated by loblolly, longleaf and pond pine. The marsh and surrounding waters provide wintering habitat for thousands of ducks and nesting habitat for colonial waterbirds. Mammalian species that inhabit this refuge are gray squirrel, marsh rabbit, white-tailed deer, red fox, raccoon, bobcat, gray fox, nutria, beaver, muskrat, river otter, mink and opossum.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge Refuge Facts ■ Established: 1964. Acres: 14,480. ■ Wildlife observation. ■ Location: the refuge is approximately 40 miles northeast of Beaufort, NC by U.S. Highway 70 and NC Highway 12 along the confluence of the Pamlico and Core Sounds, located in Carteret County, NC. ■ Photography. ■ Waterfowl hunting. ■ Two boat ramps. photo: USFWS ■ Natural History ■ Refuge’s main feature is an extensive, relatively undisturbed coastal marsh. Concentrations of diving ducks (lesser scaups, redheads, canvasbacks, buffleheads), sea ducks, American black ducks, black rails, wading birds, and shorebirds. Shorebird and osprey nesting occurs on beaches, islands and points. ■ Habitat consists of irregularly flooded brackish marsh (11,000 acres) and forested wetlands (3,480 acres). photo: USFWS photo: USFWS ■ Financial Impact of Refuge ■ Staff: one employee (administered from Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge). photo: Mike Hopiak ■ Bruce Freske, Refuge Manager Cedar Island NWR 38 Mattamuskeet Road Swan Quarter, NC 27885 Phone: 252/926 4021 Fax: 252/926 1743 E-mail: FW4RWMattamuskeet@fws.gov Public Use Opportunities ■ Fishing (saltwater). 20,000-30,000 visits annually. Refuge Objectives ■ Provide habitat and protection for endangered species such as American alligators and piping plover. ■ Provide habitat and protection for migratory waterfowl and other birds. ■ Provide wildlife-related recreation and environmental education for the public. Management Tools ■ Prescribed fire. ■ Law enforcement. Calendar of Events January-December: saltwater fishing. November-January: waterfowl hunting. Questions and Answers What is the common marsh grass that is readily seen as you travel down Highway 12 through the refuge? Black needlerush. This vast expanse of black needlerush provides habitat for rails, crabs, and other important wetland species. Can I hunt waterfowl on Cedar Island Refuge? Waterfowl hunting is permitted on 400 acres of marsh designated as a Public Hunting Area. Federal and state regulations apply.

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