Currituck

National Wildlife Refuge - North Carolina

Currituck National Wildlife Refuge is located on the northern end of North Carolina's Outer Banks ad preserves and protects the coastal barrier island ecosystem. Refuge lands are managed to provide wintering habitat for waterfowl and to protect endangered species such as piping plover, sea turtles, and seabeach amaranth. Habitat types common to most barrier islands are found on the refuge. Moving westward from the Atlantic Ocean to Currituck Sound, these habitats include sandy beaches, grassy dunes, interdunal wetlands (flats), maritime forests and shrub thickets. Currituck Sound's shoreline is made up of brackish water marshes and occasionally, mudflats that have been exposed by wind tides. A few forested islands also exist on the refuge.

brochures

Brochure of Currituck National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Currituck - Brochure

Brochure of Currituck National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Hunting at Currituck National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Currituck - Hunting

Hunting at Currituck National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Currituck NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/currituck https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Currituck_National_Wildlife_Refuge Currituck National Wildlife Refuge is located on the northern end of North Carolina's Outer Banks ad preserves and protects the coastal barrier island ecosystem. Refuge lands are managed to provide wintering habitat for waterfowl and to protect endangered species such as piping plover, sea turtles, and seabeach amaranth. Habitat types common to most barrier islands are found on the refuge. Moving westward from the Atlantic Ocean to Currituck Sound, these habitats include sandy beaches, grassy dunes, interdunal wetlands (flats), maritime forests and shrub thickets. Currituck Sound's shoreline is made up of brackish water marshes and occasionally, mudflats that have been exposed by wind tides. A few forested islands also exist on the refuge.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Currituck National Wildlife Refuge photo: USFWS photo: USFWS photo: USFWS Refuge Facts ■ Established: 1984. ■ Acres: 4,110. ■ Located in Currituck County, NC. ■ Location: the refuge is located 3/4 of a mile north of Corolla, NC. NC Route 12 ends in Corolla. After the road ends proceed up the beach 3/4 of a mile to the first refuge tract. ■ Refuge administered by Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge. ■ Accessible only by boat or by 4wheeled drive vehicle. There is no public road that provides access to this refuge. ■ photo: USFWS ■ Mike Hoff, Refuge Manager Currituck NWR c/o Mackay Island NWR P.O. Box 39 316 Marsh Causeway Knotts Island, NC 27950 Phone: 252/429 3100 Fax: 252/429 3185 E-mail: mike_hoff@fws.gov Concentrations of wading birds, shorebirds, waterfowl, and raptors with a variety of mammals, reptiles, and amphibians. Piping plover and loggerhead sea turtles occasionally nest on the refuge. Restore, enhance, and maintain the natural processes and diversity of the beach, dune, interdunal, maritime forest, and marsh habitats to ensure optimum ecological productivity and protect the water quality of Currituck Sound. ■ Provide the public with safe, high quality wildlife-dependent recreational and educational opportunities that focus on the wildlife and habitats of the refuge and the National Wildlife Refuge System. ■ Protect refuge resources by limiting adverse impacts of human activities and development. ■ Acquire and manage adequate funding, human resources, facilities, equipment, and infrastructure to accomplish the other refuge goals. Management Tools ■ Water management for waterfowl. ■ Prescribed fire. ■ Mechanical control of noxious plants. Wetlands 2,033 acres. Woodlands 778 acres. ■ Education/interpretation. Brush 874 acres. ■ Law enforcement. Beach 418 acres. ■ Partnerships. Financial Impact of Refuge ■ 69,000 visitors annually. ■ ■ Comprehensive Conservation Plan completed in 2007. Natural History ■ Refuge is found in the northern portion of Currituck Sound on an Outerbanks barrier island. Some tracts transition from the Atlantic Ocean to Currituck Sound which include sandy beaches, grassy dunes, maritime forests, shrub thickets, and fresh and brackish marshes. ■ Refuge Goals ■ Preserve, protect, and maintain healthy and viable populations of migratory birds, wildlife, fish, and plants, including federal and state endangered species and trust species. Administered by Mackay Island NWR with no assigned staff or budget. Public Use Opportunities ■ Wildlife observation. ■ Photography. ■ Hiking. ■ Waterfowl Hunting. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Calendar of Events November-January: waterfowl hunting. Questions and Answers What recreational opportunities are there on Currituck NWR? Currituck Refuge does not have any developed public use facilities such as roads, trails, restrooms, or visitor contact station. The refuge is open daily, from sunrise to sunset, throughout the year. Hiking, wildlife observation, nature photography, and waterfowl hunting are the primary wildlife-dependent activities that may be enjoyed on the refuge. Vehicle access is limited to the Monkey Island Tract and the Swan Island Tract. A four-wheeled drive vehicle is necessary since the only access is on the beach. Traffic is restricted to the beachfront only. The rest of the refuge is accessed by foot only to help prevent damage to the fragile duneecosystem. How can people help Currituck National Wildlife Refuge? Mackay Island has a new support group called Friends of Mackay Island (http://www.music-usa. org/mackay). This group supports both Mackay Island and Currituck financially, as well as providing volunteers to do projects on the refuge. Because Mackay has a small staff (and Currituck has no staff), it’s not easy to always coordinate projects for volunteers. Becoming active and supportive of Friends of Mackay Island is a great way to help the refuges. Are Corolla Wild Horses found on the refuge? The “Corolla Wild Horses” can be seen on the Outerbanks north of Corolla to the Virginia State line, which has been designated by a Currituck County ordinance as a Wild Horse Sanctuary. For the safety of the public and the horses, the ordinance also makes it unlawful for anyone to harm, approach, feed or kill any wild horse in the sanctuary. Wild horses are occasionally seen on the refuge and visitors are advised to view them from a distance. The Fish and Wildlife Service considers the horses to be non-native, feral animals and not a natural component of the barrier island ecosystem. These animals compete with native wildlife species for food and fresh water. Their activities degrade and destroy habitat which negatively impacts native species. The Service actively manages critical habitat areas by erecting fences to keep the nuisance animals out and to prevent habitat damage. Why is ATV traffic restricted to the beach? The Currituck NWR was establis
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Currituck National Wildlife Refuge Hunting Regulations 2020-2021 Welcome Currituck National Wildlife Refuge is located in the northern region of North Carolina’s Outer Banks. The 3,674-acre refuge is managed by the staff of Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge office is located one mile from the VA/NC state-line off highway 615 near Knotts Island, North Carolina. Currituck National Wildlife Refuge P.O. Box 39 Knotts Island, NC 27950 252/429 3100 http://www.fws.gov/currituck U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service 1 800/344 WILD July 2020 For more information, call the Refuge Manager at 252/429 3100. This is a unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System, a network of lands and waters managed for the benefit of wildlife and people. Currituck National Wildlife Refuge Deer and Feral Pig Hunting Permit 2020-2021 I certify that I have read and understand the refuge hunting regulations in this permit. Printed Name: _____________________________ Signed: _______________________ Date: _________________________ (Cut out and carry with license) General Information Currituck National Wildlife Refuge is open to waterfowl and big game hunting by permit only. Waterfowl hunting permits are issued by the North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission. Information can be found in the Commission’s “Permit Hunting Opportunities” publication. • The use of artificial lights (including car headlights) to locate, observe, or take animals is prohibited. Big Game Hunting Information can be found in this brochure or by contacting the refuge office at Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge. • Camping, fires, littering, and target practice are prohibited. General Regulations All general refuge regulations apply, unless specifically addressed in this brochure. Restrictions and designations on the map in this brochure also apply. Public hunting is permitted in accordance with all state laws, county codes, Title 50 - Code of Federal Regulations, and the following Refuge regulations: • Permits are required for all hunting. • All hunters are subject to inspections of permits, licenses, bag limits, hunting equipment, boats, vehicles, and their contents during compliance checks. Violation of any Refuge regulation may result in the cancellation of your hunt permit and prosecution in Federal court. • It is your responsibility to be familiar with all applicable Refuge, State and Federal hunting regulations before hunting on the Refuge. If you have a question concerning any Refuge regulation, please call the Refuge Office. • Hunter access is allowed from one hour before until one hour after legal shooting hours. Waterfowl hunters must be off the Refuge by 5:20 pm. • The use or possession of alcoholic beverages while hunting is prohibited. • Taking or collecting any plant or animal (including reptiles and amphibians) is prohibited, except as specifically authorized by the Refuge Manager. • The use of electronic calls to attract wildlife is prohibited. • Baiting or feeding wildlife and hunting with the aid of bait are prohibited. • Disturbing, molesting or interfering with any person engaged in the pursuit of an authorized activity on the Refuge is prohibited. Use of Dogs It is prohibited to use dogs to pursue, track or retrieve deer and feral pigs. Youth Each youth hunter, age 15 and younger, must remain within sight and normal voice contact of an adult age 21 or older. An adult may directly supervise up to two youth hunters, who must have successfully completed a State-approved hunter safety course and possess and carry proof of certification. Hunters with Disabilities Hunting opportunities are available for disabled hunters. Please call the Refuge Office for information and to make advanced arrangements. Waterfowl Hunting Regulations Access Access is by boat only. A shallow draft boat is highly recommended. Water depths change with the wind tides. Some areas may be only inches deep at low wind tide. Be prepared to pole into some areas. Some blinds may be inaccessible due to low water - if so that hunt may be canceled. Hunting Dates November - January: state waterfowl season. Hunting will be allowed on Fridays and Saturdays only. North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission Application and Draw Hunters may apply for blinds through the North Carolina Wildlife Resources U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Hunting will be allowed on Fridays and Saturdays only during the North Carolina Waterfowl Season. E R All public entry prohibited NO HUNTING ZONE U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICE T M EN T OF THE IN TE This area is closed to all hunting (see map) R ARCHERY HUNTING ONLY U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICE Special Regulations in Effect-Consult Manager T M R • Hunters are responsible for the proper disposal of all animal parts. T T OF THE IN PA • No dumping of animal parts within 100 feet of roads, wetlands and waterways. EN DE • Use of ATV’s/UTVs and any other unlicensed and unregistered vehicles. M R

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