Mattamuskeet

National Wildlife Refuge - North Carolina

The Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge is located within Hyde County, North Carolina. North Carolina's largest natural lake, Lake Mattamuskeet, is located entirely within the refuge. The refuge is home to the mammalian species white-tailed deer, river otters, red wolves, bobcats, and black bears.

brochures

Brochure of Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Mattamuskeet - Brochure

Brochure of Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Fact Sheet of Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Mattamuskeet - Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet of Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Tear Sheet of Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Mattamuskeet - Tear Sheet

Tear Sheet of Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Wildlife at Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Mattamuskeet - Wildlife

Wildlife at Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Hunting at Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Mattamuskeet - Hunting

Hunting at Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Fishing at Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Mattamuskeet - Fishing

Fishing at Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Mattamuskeet NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/mattamuskeet https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mattamuskeet_National_Wildlife_Refuge The Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge is located within Hyde County, North Carolina. North Carolina's largest natural lake, Lake Mattamuskeet, is located entirely within the refuge. The refuge is home to the mammalian species white-tailed deer, river otters, red wolves, bobcats, and black bears.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge The mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System is “To preserve a national network of lands and waters for the conservation and management of fish, wildlife, and plant resources of the United States for the benefit of present and future generations.” Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge is one of over 500 refuges administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This blue goose, designed by Ding Darling, has become a symbol of the Refuge System. Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge, located on the AlbemarlePamlico Peninsula in Hyde County, North Carolina, was established in 1934. The Refuge consists of 50,180 acres of open water, marsh, managed impoundments and timber. The Refuge’s main feature is the shallow 40,000 a­ cre Lake Mattamuskeet, the largest natural lake in North Carolina. Mattamuskeet Refuge provides habitat for migratory birds and other wildlife, as well as wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities for visitors. The refuge is known among wildlife enthusiasts for the thousands of wintering waterfowl that it attracts each year. History The formation of Lake Mattamuskeet remains a mystery. Some say fires burning deep into the peat soil formed the lake. Another account describes Lake Mattamuskeet and other nearby smaller lakes as being scoured out by a shower of meteors that struck the Carolina coastal plain. A final theory is that the lake remained after the historical Carolina Bays gradually receded from the area. photos: USFWS For many years the idea of draining the shallow Lake Mattamuskeet intrigued farmers and developers. Patterned after similar projects in Holland, large scale drainage operations to convert the lake bottom to farmland began in 1914. The world’s largest pumping plant at the time was built, and the lake was actually drained for periods of time. Eventually, the scheme was abandoned as impractical and too expensive. In 1934 the land was acquired by the United States Government, and the refuge was established. The Civilian Conservation Corps converted the former pumping plant into a hunting lodge which was operated until 1974. The Mattamuskeet Lodge was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. In 2007, the Lodge and 6.25 acres of adjacent land were transferred to the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission for use “… as a public facility dedicated to the conservation of the natural and cultural resources of North Carolina.” Habitat Types Lake Mattamuskeet, dotted with bald cypress trees, is 14 miles long and 5 miles wide and varies in depth from 0.5 to 4 feet with an average depth of 1.5 feet. Dense beds of submerged aquatic vegetation desired by swan, diving ducks, and some puddle ducks are produced naturally. The lake level fluctuates with rainfall, wind tides, and evapo-transpiration. A system of 15 man-made wetland impoundments totaling nearly 2,505 acres surround the south and east sides of the lake, providing feeding and resting areas for many species of migratory birds as well as resident wildlife. Refuge forests consist of approximately 1,000 acres of loblolly pine, including the 153-acre Salyer’s Ridge Natural Area, and 2,000 acres of mixed hardwoods and bald cypress. These woodlands occur in narrow strips along the refuge boundary between the marsh and higher private lands. Wildlife Over 200,000 tundra swan, Canada geese, snow geese, and 18 species of ducks over winter on the refuge annually. Mattamuskeet Refuge’s position along the Atlantic Flyway makes it a prime location for wintering waterfowl. Although noted primarily for its waterfowl, Mattamuskeet also provides habitat for many other species including wading birds, shorebirds, and birds of prey like the osprey and bald eagle. Mammals such as white-tailed deer, bobcat, river otter, black bear, and the endangered red wolf also find refuge here. A variety of amphibians including frogs, toads, and salamanders are common throughout the refuge. The rich diversity of habitats on Mattamuskeet provides a haven for reptiles including turtles, lizards, snakes and an occasional American alligator. Venomous snakes found on the refuge are the copperhead, cottonmouth, canebrake rattlesnake and Carolina pigmy rattlesnake. The lake, marsh, and woodlands provide habitat for over 240 bird species. Ospreys nest in low cypress trees near the edge of the lake. Hundreds of migratory shorebirds find resting and feeding spots along the edge of the lake and throughout the marsh impoundments. Migrating warblers are popular subjects for bird watchers in the spring and fall. Management The 2,505 acres of wetland impoundments are managed by using moist-soil techniques to produce stands of natural waterfowl foods such as wild millet, panic grasses, and spikerushes. Water levels are controlled by pumps and water control structures. Impoundments are manipulated every few years by burning, disking, or mowing to maintain these
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service February 2014 Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge leopard frogs, spring peepers, snapping turtles, yellow-bellied sliders, eastern fence lizards and 31 species of snakes. There are also more than 240 resident and migratory bird species including the Osprey and Bald Eagle. Lake Mattamuskeet is 18 miles long and 5 to 6 miles wide, with an average depth of 2 feet. Swans, diving ducks and some puddle ducks eat the abundant beds of submerged aquatic vegetation that grows in the lake. Lake levels fluctuate by rainfall, wind tides, and evaporation during summer months. Frequently Asked Questions Mixed flock at Mattamuskeet NWR, Allie Stewart, USFWS Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge is located on the AlbemarlePamlico Peninsula in Hyde County, North Carolina. Established in 1934, the 50,180-acre Refuge consists of open water, marsh, forest and croplands. The centerpiece of the Refuge is the shallow Lake Mattamuskeet. At 40,100 acres, it is North Carolina’s largest natural lake. The Refuge’s strategic location along the Atlantic Flyway makes it a vitally important site for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Over the past 35 years, up to 80 percent of the Northern Pintail and up to 30 percent of Green-wing Teal that annually migrate along the Flyway utilize Mattamuskeet. In total, the Refuge attracts more than 200,000 ducks, geese and swans from November through February. About 58,000 visitors use the Refuge annually to hunt, fish, and observe and photograph wildlife. Refuge History In the early 20th century, farmers and developers attempted to drain Lake Mattamuskeet, building the world’s largest pumping plant at the time. The lake was drained for certain periods to convert the lake bottom to farmland. Eventually, the effort was abandoned as impractical and too expensive. Does the Refuge manage lake levels? The Refuge does not actively manage water levels in the lake. The primary purpose of the Refuge is to protect and conserve migratory birds and other wildlife through the protection of wetlands. The best way to achieve that end is to allow the lake level to rise and lower naturally. Specifically, flapgates facilitate the flow of water from the lake After the U.S. Government acquired the land in 1934 to establish the Refuge, the Civilian Conservation Corps converted the former pumping plant into a hunting lodge that was operated until 1974. The Mattamuskeet Lodge was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980, and it was transferred to the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission in 2007. Habitat and Wildlife A system of 14 manmade wetland impoundments totaling nearly 2,500 acres surround the south, east and west sides of the lake, providing feeding and resting areas for wintering waterfowl and many other species of migratory birds as well as resident wildlife. The impoundments are managed by pumps and water control structures. Bald cypress trees, mixed hardwood forest, grassland, cropland and scrub-shrub habitat contribute to the diversity of habitat on the Refuge. In addition to waterfowl, the Refuge is home to a diverse population of wildlife, including deer, bobcat, gray fox, black bear, the endangered red wolf, largemouth bass, crappie, blue crab, blueback herring and American eel. The rich diversity of habitats provides a haven for amphibians and reptiles such as bullfrogs, southern Mattamuskeet NWR is in a strategic location along the Atlantic Flyway, a bird migration route. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Is the salinity in the lake increasing? No, not year to year. However, due to evaporation, salinity increases slightly during the summer months mainly around the mouths of the major outlet canals. Are there fewer largemouth bass in the lake today than previous years? Most likely. Based on survey results, it appears there has been a gradual decline in largemouth bass populations in recent years. Possible causes include a lack of fish stocking, degraded water quality, decreased spawning success and high predation rates. No fish have been stocked in the lake since 2007. The Service is working with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission’s fisheries staff to study the health and well-being of the largemouth bass population and other popular game species. Great Blue Heron, USFWS to Pamlico Sound when lake levels are higher than sound levels. When the lake falls below the levels of the sound, the gates close to prevent saltwater from entering the lake. Lake levels tend to be higher during the rainy season (winter) and lower during the dry season (summer). The lower lake levels in the summer spur the growth of emergent and submergent wetland plants that are used by migrating and wintering waterfowl. The Refuge also periodically dredges portions of the four canals connecting the lake to the sound. Maintaining the original depth of the canals improves their flushing capacity, which keeps the lake healthy by removing excess nutrients and sedi
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge, located on the Albemarle-Pamlico Peninsula in Hyde County, North Carolina, was established in 1934. The Refuge consists of 50,180 acres of open water, marsh, timber, and croplands. The Refuge’s main feature is the shallow 40,000 a­ cre Lake Mattamuskeet, the largest natural lake in North Carolina. Mattamuskeet Refuge provides habitat for migratory birds and other wildlife, as well as wildlife-dependent recreational opportunities for visitors. The refuge is known among wildlife enthusiasts for the thousands of wintering waterfowl that it attracts each year. History The formation of Lake Mattamuskeet remains a mystery. Some say fires burning deep into the peat soil formed the lake. Another account describes Lake Mattamuskeet and other nearby smaller lakes as being scoured out by a shower of meteors that struck the Carolina coastal plain. A final theory is that the lake remained after the historical Carolina Bays gradually receded from the area. For many years the idea of draining the shallow Lake Mattamuskeet intrigued farmers and developers. Patterned after similar projects in Holland, large scale drainage operations to convert the lake bottom to farmland began in 1914. The world’s largest pumping plant at the time was built, and the lake was actually drained for periods of time. Eventually, the scheme was abandoned as impractical and too expensive. In 1934 the land was acquired by the United States Government, and the refuge was established. The Civilian Conservation Corps converted the former pumping plant into a hunting lodge which was operated until 1974. The Mattamuskeet Lodge was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. In 2007 the Lodge and 6.25 acres of adjacent land were transferred to the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission for use “… as a public facility dedicated to the conservation of the natural and cultural resources of North Carolina.” Keith Ramos Habitat Types Lake Mattamuskeet, dotted with bald cypress trees, is 14 miles long and 5 miles wide and varies in depth from 0.5 to 4 feet with an average depth of 1.5 feet. Dense beds of submerged aquatic vegetation desired by swan, diving ducks, and some puddle ducks are produced naturally. The lake level fluctuates with rainfall, wind tides, and evapo-transpiration. A system of 15 man-made wetland impoundments totaling nearly 2,505 acres surround the south and east sides of the lake, providing feeding and resting areas for many species of migratory birds as well as resident wildlife. A farming area contributes another 125 acres of cropland and 275 acres of grassland to the diversity of habitat types on the refuge. Refuge forests consist of approximately 1,000 acres of loblolly pine, including the 153-acre Salyer’s Ridge Natural Area, and 2,000 acres of mixed hardwoods and bald cypress. These woodlands occur in narrow strips along the refuge boundary between the marsh and higher private lands. Wildlife Over 100,000 tundra swan, Canada geese, snow geese, and 18 species of ducks overwinter on the refuge annually. Mattamuskeet Refuge’s position along the Atlantic Flyway makes it a prime location for wintering waterfowl. which run from Highway 94 to the refuge headquarters and along the south side of the Entrance Road Impoundment. An observation viewing deck is available along the Highway 94 Causeway. Visitors are welcome to walk or bicycle throughout the refuge, however, visitors are cautioned to review the corresponding map and observe refuge regulatory signs as some areas are closed to the public during the winter. Each December the refuge hosts an annual Open House where visitors may enjoy tours of a part of the refuge which is normally closed to public access in the winter. Swan, snow geese, northern pintail and other waterfowl as well as bald eagles are often observed. Although noted primarily for its waterfowl, Mattamuskeet also provides habitat for many other species including wading birds, shorebirds, and birds of prey like the osprey and bald eagle. Mammals such as deer, bobcat, otter, black bear, and the endangered red wolf also find refuge here. A variety of amphibians including frogs, toads, and salamanders are common throughout the refuge. Boating and sport fishing for largemouth bass, striped bass, catfish, crappie, and other species is permitted on Lake Mattamuskeet and the adjacent canals. Taking blue crabs at the water control structures is a very popular sport enjoyed by all age groups. All fishing activities must be conducted in accordance with state regulations. Additional refuge regulations are available at the refuge headquarters. The rich diversity of habitats on Mattamuskeet provides a haven for reptiles including snapping turtles, yellowbelly turtles, eastern fence lizards, and 31 species of snakes. The only poisonous snakes are the copperhead, cottonmouth, canebrake rattlesnake, and the
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Mattamuskeet and Swanquarter National Wildlife Refuges Wildlife List photo: F. Eugene Hester tundra swan Mattamuskeet and Swanquarter National Wildlife Refuges are located in Hyde County, North Carolina. They are two of over 548 National Wildlife Refuges administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior. The National Wildlife Refuge System is an extensive network of lands and waters protected and managed especially for Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge, established in 1934, consists of 50,180 acres of open water, marsh, timber, and cropland. The refuge’s main feature is Lake Mattamuskeet, the largest natural lake in North Carolina. Although 40,000 acres in size, the lake only averages two feet deep. The Refuge is well known for the thousands of wintering waterfowl it attracts each year. This blue goose, designed by J. N. “Ding” Darling, has become a symbol of the National Wildlife Refuge System. Swanquarter National Wildlife Refuge is 16,411 acres of saltmarsh islands and forested wetlands interspersed with potholes, creeks, and drains. Established in 1932, the refuge provides wintering habitat for puddle and diving ducks, and nesting habitat for colonial waterbirds. Approximately 8,800 acres are included in the National Wilderness Preservation System. photo: F. Eugene Hester Mattamuskeet and Swanquarter National Wildlife Refuges photo: Keith Sylvester photo: F. Eugene Hester northern shoveler bald eagle wood duck This wildlife checklist is provided to acquaint refuge visitors with birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians of both Mattamuskeet and Swanquarter Refuges. Observing wildlife can be enjoyable. Field guides and binoculars are recommended to help identify wildlife that you observe. Visitors are encouraged to report any rare or unusual sightings to the refuge headquarters. Mammals Most mammals are secretive and wary of humans. Many of them are active at night. So don’t expect to see all the mammalian species on this list. Mattamuskeet and Swanquarter Refuges host 41 species of mammals. Tracks and scats may be the only traces of mammals that you will see during your visit. A field guide will be helpful to identify a mammal by the evidence it leaves behind. Marsupials Opossum Insectivores Southeastern Shrew Short-tailed Shrew Least Shrew Bats Big Brown Bat Silver-haired Bat Eastern Pipistrelle Bat Brazilian Free-tailed Bat Eastern Mole Star-nosed Mole Red Bat Hoary Bat Evening Bat Rabbits Eastern Cottontail Marsh Rabbit Rodents Gray Squirrel Southern Flying Squirrel Beaver Rice Rat Eastern Harvest Mouse Golden Mouse White-footed Mouse Cotton Mouse Carnivores Red Fox Gray Fox Red Wolf Black Bear Raccoon Hispid Cotton Rat Meadow Vole Muskrat Black Rat Norway Rat House Mouse Nutria Long-tailed Weasel Mink River Otter Bobcat Marine Mammals Atlantic Bottlenosed Dolphin Manatee Hoofed Mammals White-tailed Deer Amphibians Toads, frogs, and salamanders belong to the class Amphibia, derived from the Greek “amphibious” meaning “living a double life.” These clawless, moist-skinned animals pass through a larval stage as young, usually in an aquatic environment, before growing into adults. Mattamuskeet and Swanquarter Refuges provide habitat for 24 amphibian species. Salamanders Greater Siren Eastern Newt Dwarf Mudpuppy Two-toed Amphiuma Marbled Salamander Southern Dusky Salamander Slimy Salamander Toads Eastern Spadefoot Toad Oak Toad Southern Toad Fowler’s Toad Eastern Narrowmouth Toad Frogs Southern Cricket Frog Gray Treefrog Green Treefrog Spring Peeper Pine Woods Treefrog Squirrel Treefrog Little Grass Frog Brimley’s Chorus Frog Bullfrog Green Frog Southern Leopard Frog Carpenter Frog Reptiles Reptiles have skin covered with scales or plates. Snakes and a few lizards are legless. Other reptiles have two pairs of limbs each with five clawed toes. Reptiles include turtles, snakes, lizards and the alligator. The diversity of habitats at Mattamuskeet and Swanquarter Refuges supports 44 reptilian species. Alligator American Alligator Turtles Snapping Turtle Eastern Mud Turtle River Cooter Florida Cooter Painted Turtle Lizards Carolina Anole Five-lined Skink Southeastern Five-lined Skink Snakes Worm Snake Black Racer Ringneck Snake Corn Snake Greenish Rat Snake Mud Snake Rainbow Snake Eastern Hognose Snake Eastern Kingsnake Redbelly Turtle Yellowbelly Slider Spotted Turtle Diamondback Terrapin Eastern Box Turtle Broadhead Skink Ground Skink Eastern Glass Lizard Brown Water Snake Rough Green Snake Glossy Crayfish Snake Brown Snake Redbelly Snake Carolina Watersnake Eastern Ribbon Snake Eastern Garter Snake Rough Earth Snake Scarlet Kingsnake Copperhead Redbelly Water Snake Cottonmouth Banded Water Snake Canebrake Rattlesnake Northern Water Snake Pygmy Rattlesnake Carolina Swamp Snake Birds Mattamuskeet and Swanquarter Refuges are wintering grounds for large numbers of ducks, geese and swans. Ospreys nest in low cypress
Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge The 50,180 acre Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1934 primarily to preserve wintering habitat for migratory waterfowl. The refuge’s predominant feature is the 40,000 acre Lake Mattamuskeet, the largest natural lake in North Carolina. The regulated harvest of surplus animals is one tool used to manage wildlife populations. General Hunting Regulations Mattamuskeet Refuge is open to hunting of tundra swan, Canada and snow geese, ducks, coots, and white-tailed deer in accordance with applicable State and Federal regulations. The regulations below supplement the general regulations found in Title 50, Code of Federal Regulations, which govern activities, including hunting, on national wildlife refuges. Hunters under the age of 16 must have successfully passed a State-approved hunter education course and provide proof of certification (card or certificate) upon request, and must be directly supervised by an adult 21 years of age or older. Hunters using the refuge are subject to inspections of permits, licenses, hunting equipment, bag limits, vehicles, and their contents by Refuge or state law enforcement officers. The taking or possession of any wildlife, including reptiles and/or amphibians, or any part thereof, except when permitted during a Refuge hunt or transporting same along a State Road, is prohibited. How to Apply for Permits Permits are required to hunt on Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge. Prospective hunters must apply for permits through the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission’s Permit Hunting Opportunities Program. Hunters can apply at a North Carolina Wildlife Service Agent, by telephone at 1/888/248 6834 or online at www.ncwildlife.org/permithunt Give the Agent the Item Number of the hunt being applied for. Item Numbers for the Mattamuskeet NWR hunts are: September Canada goose hunt - Item Number 7047; Youth waterfowl hunt - Item Number 7046; Waterfowl hunt - Item Number 7045; Disabled waterfowl hunt - Item Number 7048; Deer hunt - Item Number 7050. An application fee of $8 will be charged by the State for each goose, deer or waterfowl hunt application. An application fee of $10 will be charged by the State for all disabled hunts applied for in the same transaction. Hunters selected in the State drawing will be notified with instructions on how to submit the user fee to receive their refuge hunt permit. The user fee must be received before the permits are issued. Deer Hunt Deer hunting will be authorized on Mattamuskeet Refuge during two-day paired hunts on October 20 - 21 and October 27 - 28 Permits Apply through the North Carolina Permit Hunting Opportunities Program. Hunt Item Number is 7050. Application period is from July 1 - August 10. Applications can be made individually or by groups of up to five hunters. Successfully drawn applicants will be required to pay a $15.00 user fee per person to the Refuge prior to being issued a permit. Hunters must carry on their person the signed refuge permit. Bag Limits With the appropriate North Carolina big game license, each hunter may take one antlered and one antlerless or two antlerless deer per day on Mattamuskeet Refuge. Manner of Take Deer may only be taken with shotgun, muzzleloading rifle/ shotgun, bow and arrow, or crossbow. Access Permitted deer hunters will be authorized access from one hour before legal shooting time until one hour after legal shooting time. Vehicles are restricted to designated roads only. Access to open hunting areas behind road gates will be by foot, bicycle, and/or boat only. Other Special Regulations All persons participating in the deer hunt must wear a minimum of 500 square inches of fluorescent orangecolored material above the waistline that is visible from any direction. All ground blinds must display a minimum of 144 square inches of fluorescent orange-colored material visible from all directions. Permits Apply through the North Carolina Permit Hunt Opportunities Program. The youth waterfowl hunt Item Number is 7046, the general waterfowl hunt Item Hunt is 7045. Disabled hunters can apply for the disabled accessible hunt blind, Item Number 7048. The application period for waterfowl hunts is July 1 - October 1. Hunters may not shoot on, from, or across any road accessible surface to include the following: Farm Field Road and East Main Road. See Refuge Map for road locations. Individuals selected for the waterfowl hunt will be reserved two consecutive hunt dates and may bring two guests to participate in the hunt. A user fee of $15.00 per person will be collected prior to hunting each day of the waterfowl hunt. Unclaimed reservations as of 5 am of each hunt date will be allotted to standbys via a lottery system. The construction and/or use of permanent blinds, platforms, and/or ladders is prohibited. Permit hunters may put up one portable blind or stand the day before the start of their hunt and must remove it at the end of the second d
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service The minimum length limit for blue crabs is 5-inches carapace width (point-to-point). Mattamuskeet Crabs caught on Mattamuskeet NWR are for personal use only and may not be sold. National Wildlife Refuge Sport Fishing Regulations Prohibited Activities n Airboats, sailboats, jet skis, and windboards n Camping n Commercial Use n Fires n Fireworks n Herring dipping n Leaving boats on the Refuge overnight n Littering - this includes not removing crab lines n Off road driving/ATV’s, UTV’s, FourWheelers, etc. n Swimming n Taking, removing, disturbing or possessing wildlife and plants n Taking/possessing reptiles and amphibians n Use of trot lines, set lines, limb lines, or jug lines Motorized and nonmotorized fishing boats, canoes and kayaks are only permitted on the Refuge from March 1 through October 31. The Refuge is closed to all boating the rest of the year. The Refuge is open during daylight hours. Please stay at least 50 yards away from osprey nests. This is especially critical during the active nesting season (generally between March 1 and August 1). Osprey nesting success is susceptible to human disturbance. Please report any disturbance or harassment, or other violations you see to Refuge personnel. General fishing regulations and special regulations are codified in Title 50, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 32. If you have any questions regarding activities on the Refuge please contact the refuge manager at 252/926 4021. Please be courteous to other refuge visitors. March 2020 The Refuge speed limit is 25 m.p.h. unless otherwise posted. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service 1 800/344 WILD Fishermen and crabbers using the Refuge are subject to inspections of licenses, equipment, creel limits, vehicles and contents during compliance checks by refuge and state officers. Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge 85 Mattamuskeet Road Swan Quarter, NC 27885 252/926 4021 https://www.fws.gov/refuge/mattamuskeet Other Do not feed the wildlife. To Columbia NORTH CAROLINA Mattamuskeet 94 Fairfield Lake Rd. s Rd . North Jarvis Canal National Wildlife Refuge Piney Wood ppin upo a W al Can 264 LAKE MATTAMUSKEET No. 1 East Canal GREAT ISLAND Rose Bay Canal Turnpike Rd. tM ain Ca Wildlife Drive Swindell Fork ain M ast na l Miles 0 2 C E N ter 264 New Holland l tfa Levee Canal Refuge boundary 2 al an Legend Kilos lC 0 Lake Landing Canal l a an Ou Sw To an ar Qu Central Canal We s To Engelhard Regulations Fishing will be in accordance with all applicable state regulations subject to the following conditions: Water Sport fishing, bow fishing and crabbing are permitted from Boat ramp March 1 through October 31 from 1/2 hour before legal sunrise Refuge headquarters to 1/2 hour after legal sunset, with the following exceptions: Bank fishing and crabbing are permitted year-round in these areas: n from Highway 94 (only area where fishing and crabbing are permitted 24 hours per day) n from and south of the northern most bridge at Lake Landing Canal from the Outfall Canal water control structure n from the Central Canal bridge n along West Main and East Main Canals between the Entrance Road Bridge and Number 1 East Canal as posted n from the Rose Bay Canal boat ramp dock Bank fishing and crabbing are prohibited along the Entrance Road from Highway 94 to the Entrance Road bridge and along the Wildlife Drive from Entrance Road to Highway 94. Reminder State fishing license requirements apply. Inland game fish may be taken only with a hook and line. State size and creel limits apply. All fishing and crabbing lines must be attended. Fish caught on Mattamuskeet NWR are for personal use only and may not be sold. n Crabbing The appropriate state inland (freshwater) fishing license is required to crab on Mattamuskeet NWR. Only five hand lines and/or hand-activated traps per person are permitted. Crab pots are prohibited. The take/ possession limit is 12 blue crabs per person per day.

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