Pea Island

National Wildlife Refuge - North Carolina

Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge is located on North Carolina's Pea Island, a coastal barrier island and part of a chain of islands known as the Outer Banks, adjacent to Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The refuge provides nesting, resting, and wintering habitat for migratory birds, including the greater snow geese and other migratory waterfowl, shorebirds, wading birds, raptors, and neotropical migrants, as well as habitat and protection for endangered and threatened species.

maps

Official visitor map of Cape Hatteras National Seashore (NS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cape Hatteras - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Cape Hatteras National Seashore (NS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

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Map of Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Pea Island - Map

Map of Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Fact Sheet of Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Pea Island - Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet of Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Birds at Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Pea Island - Birds

Birds at Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Fishing at Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Pea Island - Fishing

Fishing at Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in North Carolina. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Pea Island NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/pea_island https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cedar_Island_National_Wildlife_Refuge Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge is located on North Carolina's Pea Island, a coastal barrier island and part of a chain of islands known as the Outer Banks, adjacent to Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The refuge provides nesting, resting, and wintering habitat for migratory birds, including the greater snow geese and other migratory waterfowl, shorebirds, wading birds, raptors, and neotropical migrants, as well as habitat and protection for endangered and threatened species.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge Oregon Inlet Yours to enjoy... Year-round Visitor Center n Open 9:00 am to 4:00 pm. n Educational wildlife exhibits, maps, brochures, and general information. n Gift shop operated by Coastal Wildlife Refuge Society to benefit Refuge programs. n Refuge volunteers available to answer questions and provide information. N NC 12 Photoblind available during daylight hours (see map). North Pond Service Road n Ocea n By obeying regulations. Salt Flats Wildlife Trail North Pond Wildlife Trail (no pets) n Half-mile, universally accessible. Wheelchair available for loan at Visitor Center. n Bicycles prohibited on wildlife trail. n Overlooks, towers, and spotting scopes. Visitor Center and North Pond Wildlife Trail Refuge Service Road around North Pond (no pets) More energetic visitors may choose to walk or bicycle the four miles of service road around North Pond and back along NC 12. New Field Pond Hatched Area Closed to All Public Entry Regulations In addition to these provisions, all State laws, County codes, and Title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulations apply on the Refuge. If you have any questions about the legality of any activity, please contact the Refuge Manager. N You Can Help! tic Atlan n Atlantic Ocean Salt Flats Wildlife Trail By respecting this unique place. By volunteering your time. Contact Volunteer Coordinator 252/473 1131 ext. 227 By joining the Refuge non-profit support group. Your membership fees and donations benefit Refuge programs. North Pond Pamlico Sound 0 1/8 NC 12 1/4 MILES Coastal Wildlife Refuge Society P.O. Box 1808 Manteo, NC 27954 Atlantic Ocean http://www. coastalwildliferefuge. com South Pond Refuge Visitor Center North Pond N n Daylight use only. (Refuge closed from sunset to sunrise) n Do not enter closed areas. n Leashed pets ONLY in authorized areas. n No pets allowed on west side of NC 12 (except parking areas). n Drive on designated roadways (no vehicles on beach). n Feeding of wildlife is prohibited. n Littering, camping, hunting, fires, fireworks, metal detectors, kite boarding, wind surfing, use of personal watercraft, drones, and public nudity are prohibited. n Fishing, boating, swimming, and wading in ponds are prohibited. Unimproved Unimproved boat b oatramp ramp n Stopping or parking a vehicle (either attended or unattended) on a road, trail, or fire lane such that it blocks the free movement of other vehicles is prohibited. Information Information n Possession of firearms is permitted in accordance with State law. CLOSED AREA New Field Pond and the area south of the Wildlife Trail and west of NC Highway 12 to New Inlet are closed to all public entry lico Soun NC 12 d PeaIslandTearsheet.indd 1 North Pond Wildlife Trail Pam For more information Contact the Visitor Center at 252/987 2394 or Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge P. O. Box 1969 Manteo, NC 27954 email: alligatorriver@fws.gov http://www.fws.gov/refuge/pea_island New Inlet NC 12 New Field Pond 0 1/8 1/4 MILES Universally Universally accessible accessibility Observation Observation Visit the National Wildlife Refuges Visitor Center on Roanoke Island Rodanthe 0 2 MILES http://www.fws.gov/ ncgatewayvc 4 Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge http://www.fws.gov/refuge/ pea_island Parking Parking Photo Photo blind blind Restrooms Restrooms Walking trail trail Walking NC 12 6/19/15 9:39 AM
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge Refuge Facts ■ Established: April 12, 1938. photo: USFWS photo: USFWS photo: USFWS photo: USFWS ■ Mike Bryant, Refuge Manager Alligator River NWR P. O. Box 1969 708 North Highway 64 Manteo, NC 27954 Phone: 252/473 1131 Fax: 252/473 1668 E-mail: alligatorriver@fws.gov Size: Originally: 5,915 acres (land), 25,700 acres (Proclamation Boundary Waters). Currently: 4,655 acres. ■ Administered by Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. ■ Located on the north end of Hatteras Island, a coastal barrier island and part of a chain of islands known as the Outer Banks. ■ Approximately 13 miles long (north to south) and ranges from a quarter mile to one mile wide (from east to west). ■ Location: 10 miles south of Nags Head, NC on NC Highway 12. ■ The Comprehensive Conservation Plan for Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge was completed July 17, 2006. Natural History ■ Area was historically used for market waterfowl hunting, hunt clubs, commercial fishing, farming, and livestock operations. ■ Refuge is comprised of ocean beach, dunes, upland, fresh and brackish water ponds, salt flats, and salt marsh. ■ Bird list boasts more than 365 species; wildlife list has 25 species of mammals, 24 species of reptiles, and 5 species (low number due to salt environment) of amphibians. ■ ■ ■ ■ Endangered and threatened species include loggerhead sea turtles and piping plovers. Both species nest on the refuge. Financial Impacts ■ Administered by Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. Pea Island has no assigned staff or budget. ■ One employee reports for duty to Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge on a daily basis. ■ Numerous volunteers devote approximately 25,000 hours each year to Pea Island. ■ 2.7 million visitors annually. ■ Known as a “Birder’s Paradise”; birders are among the most affluent eco-tourists. Other visitors include paddlers, fishermen, and photographers. Refuge Goals ■ Protect, maintain, and enhance healthy and viable populations of indigenous migratory birds, wildlife, fish, and plants including federal and state threatened and endangered species. ■ Restore, maintain, and enhance the health and biodiversity of barrier island upland and wetland habitats to ensure optimum ecological productivity. ■ Concentrations of ducks, geese, swans, wading birds, shore birds, raptors, and neotropical migrants are seasonally abundant on the refuge. Provide the public with safe, quality wildlife-dependent recreational and educational opportunities that focus on barrier island wildlife and habitats of the refuge. Continue to participate in local efforts to sustain economic health through naturebased tourism. ■ Refuge has 790 acres of manageable waterfowl and waterbird impoundments. Protect refuge resources by limiting the adverse impacts of human activities and development. ■ Acquire and manage adequate funding, human resources, facilities, equipment, and infrastructure to accomplish all refuge goals. Several colonial waterbird nesting areas are located on the refuge. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Management Tools ■ Water level manipulation in three brackish/freshwater impoundments. ■ Prescribed fire. ■ Mechanical/chemical control of noxious and invasive plants. ■ Wildlife and habitat surveys. ■ Environmental education. ■ Wildlife Interpretation. ■ Law enforcement. ■ Outreach. ■ Partnerships. Public Use Opportunities ■ Half-mile, universally-accessible foot trail. ■ Refuge Visitor Center with interpretive wildlife exhibits and sales area operated by the Refuge’s non-profit support group, the Coastal Wildlife Refuge Society. ■ Surf and sound fishing. ■ Observation tower and platforms. ■ Nature photography, including public photo-blind. ■ Environmental education. ■ Interpretive programs. Calendar of Events Year-round: Weekly Bird Walks. May: International Migratory Bird Day, weekly bird walks. May-October: guided canoe tours (fee program). June: Crabbing/Fishing Rodeo. June-August: children’s wildlife programs, summer bird walks, turtle talks, guided canoe tours (fee program). October: National Wildlife Refuge Week. November: Wings Over Water. Questions and Answers What can I do to help Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge? You can help this refuge by volunteering your time as a volunteer, donating your money to the Coastal Wildlife Refuge Society (the refuge non-profit support group), and by being a good steward for natural resources. Contact the Society (http://www.fws.gov/alligatorriver/ cwrs.html)! They’ll tell you all kinds of ways you can help! Pea Island Refuge uses volunteers in a variety of program areas. Local volunteers work regularly staffing the Visitor Center, maintaining interpretive trails, putting up signs, conducting interpretive tours, and assisting with biological and maintainance work. We also have programs for interns and resident volunteers. Why do some rangers wear green uniforms and s
BIRDS of the OUTER BANKS Nearly 400 species of birds have been sighted within Cape Hatteras National Seashore. This impressive number is due to several factors, which include: the rich diversity of habitats; the fact that the ocean off the Banks is biologically rich, in part because of the mixing of subtropical waters from the south with the temperate waters from the mid-Atlantic; and the limited extent of land, which tends to concentrate vagrants. In spite of its rich potential, the Banks is actually underbirded. In fact, sometimes a visiting birder discovers a species that has never been recorded in this area before. The area covered by this list includes all of Cape Hatteras National Seashore, from Nags Head south to Ocracoke village, to include Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge. Also included is the Fort Raleigh National Historic Site on Roanoke Island. Note that the bar-graph statuses provided in this list are based on the sites where species are easiest to find. For instance, the statuses given for most waterfowl species are based on their abundances at Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge. Some resident landbird species that are easy to find at Fort Raleigh National Historic Site are much harder to find further south on the Banks, e.g. Brown-headed Nuthatch. WHEN and WHERE Birding is always exciting on the Outer Banks though the greatest variety of species occurs during spring and fall migrations. For those seeking out migratory shorebirds, the various inlet tidal flats, the ponds at Pea Island and Bodie Island, and the salt pond at Cape Hatteras Point offer the greatest concentrations. However, the ponds at Pea Island and Bodie Island offer the greatest variety, and typically the best chance of seeing one of the rarer species. Landbird migration in fall can be excellent, but typically only after strong cold fronts. The best areas to look for these migrants is along the dikes at Pea Island; the northern tip of Pea Island, near the Oregon Inlet bridge; and at Fort Raleigh, especially in and around the Elizabethan Gardens and along the section of the hiking trail that ends at Croatan Sound. In winter, ocean-watching is generally best from Cape Hatteras northward. Occasionally in winter, especially in severe weather, Cape Hatteras Point may be almost blanketed with gulls, providing the opportunity to see several of the rarer species. Often in late May, impressive numbers of pelagic birds—storm-petrels, shearwaters, jaegers—may be seen in northward migration passing just off the tip of Cape Hatteras Point. Even if you visit the Outer Banks during a slower period, don’t forget that exciting birds can turn up any time. J F M AM J J A S O N D ABUNDANCE DESIGNATIONS GREBES __ __ __ __ COMMON: Certain to be found in proper habitat FAIRLY COMMON: Will usually be found UNCOMMON: Present, but will often be missed OCCASIONAL: May require several visits to find * Pied-billed Grebe Horned Grebe Red-necked Grebe Eared Grebe •••••••• •••**** __ __ __ __ VERY RARE TO ACCIDENTAL: Found less often than five times a decade. See separate list at end of checklist ••••*** • • •• * •* *• * •• ••** Cory's Shearwater Great Shearwater Sooty Shearwater Manx Shearwater __ Audubon's Shearwater J F M AM J J A S O N D GEESE & DUCKS __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ Snow Goose (Light Morph) "Blue Goose" Ross's Goose Brant Canada Goose Mute Swan Tundra Swan Wood Duck Gadwall Eurasian Wigeon American Wigeon American Black Duck Mallard Blue-winged Teal Northern Shoveler Northern Pintail Green-winged Teal "Common Teal" Canvasback Redhead Ring-necked Duck Greater Scaup Lesser Scaup King Eider Common Eider Harlequin Duck Surf Scoter White-winged Scoter Black Scoter Long-tailed Duck Bufflehead Common Goldeneye Hooded Merganser Common Merganser Red-breasted Merganser Ruddy Duck ***** •••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••• ••*********** ••••••• *********** • ••****** •• • **••• •••• •••••••••••••• ••••••• ••** •• •••** •• •• • **** ******* ••• ••• •**** • • • ••• •••• •••• •• ********** ******* ••••••••••••****** ***•••••• *********** ****** •******* •• • •• •••************•• •••••* ••• ••* *• •• ••• • ********** ***** •••*********•••• •••******* *•• GALLINACEOUS BIRDS __ Northern Bobwhite LOONS __ Red-throated Loon __ Common Loon STORM-PETRELS * __ Wilson's Storm-Petrel __ Leach's Storm-Petrel •••••••************•• • •• ••****** *•• ••••••••••••• J F M AM J J A S O N D PELICANS & ALLIES __ __ __ __ __ __ American Bittern Least Bittern Great Blue Heron Great Egret Snowy Egret Little Blue Heron Tricolored Heron Reddish Egret Cattle Egret Green Heron Black-crowned Night-Heron Yellow-crowned Night-Heron ••• •••**** ••••••**********•••••• •••••••••**********************• Osprey Swallow-tailed Kite Mississippi Kite Bald Eagle Northern Harrier Sharp-shinned Hawk Cooper's Hawk Red-shouldered Hawk Broad-winged Hawk Red-tai
September 2004 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service 1 800/344 WILD Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge P.O. Box 1969 Manteo, NC 27954 252/473 1131 http://peaisland.fws. gov e-mail: peaisland@fws.gov Please cut along this line. Driver’s Signature Date This special parking permit is only valid when it has been signed and dated by the driver of this vehicle. September 15 -May 31 In compliance with all conditions of the permit and with all Refuge, Federal, State, and Local laws and regulations, during the following times: Nighttime Surf Fishing (recreational only) The owner, driver, or passenger of this vehicle is permitted to access the Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge, Dare County, North Carolina for the following purpose: SPECIAL PARKING PERMIT Department of the Interior U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge Nighttime Surf Fishing Permit & Regulations Refuge Nighttime Surf Fishing (recreational ONLY) Permit and Regulations Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge Name Address City State Zip This card, when signed and in your possession, will serve as a refuge nighttime fishing permit and acknowledges that you have read and understand the regulations contained in this leaflet. This permit is not transferable and is only valid if signed and dated by you. Signed Date This permit is valid from September 15 - May 31. Introduction Surf and sound fishing are popular activities for many visitors to Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge. Surf or sound anglers may take home a catch of speckled and gray trout, spot, flounder, bluefish, red drum or striped bass. All State and Federal regulations and limits apply. Please check regulations for what is in season and creel limits. ■ ■ Because title 50 of the Code of Federal Regulation states that Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge is open only during daylight hours, a permit is required to access the beach at night for fishing. When used according to directions, this leaflet provides all the information needed to gain legal access for night fishing. Read all information carefully, then sign and date the permit section on the front. 2. The catwalk on Bonner Bridge and 3. The New Inlet parking lot. (Nighttime parking at New Inlet is allowed only for fishing access.) ■ Driving of any motorized vehicle on the beach is prohibited. Camping on the refuge is prohibited. ■ Parking in any of the designated public parking lots is recommended. Overnight parking in the refuge visitor center parking lot is not permitted (nighttime use is restricted to the traveling public for use of the public restrooms or pay telephone). Parking, in a safe and proper manner, is permitted anywhere on the unpaved road shoulders of NC Highway 12; however, it is not recommended. Nighttime Surf Fishing Regulations ■ All nighttime surf fishing anglers must carry on their person a signed and dated permit. ■ ■ ■ Recreational surf fishing during nighttime hours (1/ 2 hour after sunset to 1/2 hour before sunrise) is the only authorized use under this permit. Camping, littering, fires, cooking, shell collecting, beach combing, swimming, surfing, and other activities are not permitted. Commercial fishing is not authorized under this permit. This permit is valid only from September 15 through May 31. From June 1 through September 14, all refuge beaches are closed to nighttime fishing. When parking a vehicle on the refuge during nighttime hours, the driver of the vehicle shall display a signed and dated Special Parking Permit. ■ ■ ■ Oregon Inlet Bonner Bridge A refuge permit is not required for nighttime parking or access to the following areas: 1. The parking lot, adjacent to the Oregon Inlet on the north end of the refuge The almost 13 miles of pristine beach on Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge provides excellent opportunities for wildlife observation, swimming, surfing, shelling, sunbathing, surf fishing, or just strolling in the fresh ocean breeze. But, remember, national wildlife refuges are for Wildlife First. While fishing, wildlife observation, photography and other wildlife-dependent recreation are encouraged on the refuge, these activities must be scheduled around the needs of wildlife. For this reason, you may see refuge signs occasionally that close areas to all public entry. Your respect for these signs and the messages they communicate will help protect nesting areas for sea turtles and shorebirds. These signs are also used to keep visitors away from unsafe areas. This permit only authorizes access to the beach area east of NC Highway (see map). Do not enter or walk across any “Closed Areas.” The use of battery-powered or propane fueled artificial lights, lanterns, and chemical “light sticks” is permitted. The use of gasoline-fueled lanterns is prohibited because of the potential for accidental fuel spills. Artificial light devices shall not exceed 50,000 candle power. Artificial lights shall only be used to s

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