Jockey's Ridge

State Park - North Carolina

Jockey's Ridge State Park is located in Nags Head, North Carolina, and includes the tallest active sand dune system in the eastern United States. Jockey's Ridge contains three unique ecosystems: the Roanoke Sound, the dune system, and the maritime forest. Often when it rains, water collects near the bottom of the dunes creating temporary ponds known as vernal pools. Few fauna can be seen around the dunes, although some types of flora, such as tall grass, may be seen near the bottom of the dunes.

maps

Official visitor map of Cape Hatteras National Seashore (NS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Cape Hatteras - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Cape Hatteras National Seashore (NS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Fort Raleigh National Historic Site (NHS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Fort Raleigh - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Fort Raleigh National Historic Site (NHS) in North Carolina. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

brochures

Visitor Map of Jockey's Ridge State Park (SP) in North Carolina. Published by North Carolina State Parks.Jockey's Ridge - Map

Visitor Map of Jockey's Ridge State Park (SP) in North Carolina. Published by North Carolina State Parks.

Fact Sheet for Jockey's Ridge State Park (SP) in North Carolina. Published by North Carolina State Parks.Jockey's Ridge - Fact Sheet

Fact Sheet for Jockey's Ridge State Park (SP) in North Carolina. Published by North Carolina State Parks.

Jockey's Ridge SP https://www.ncparks.gov/jockeys-ridge-state-park/home https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jockey's_Ridge_State_Park Jockey's Ridge State Park is located in Nags Head, North Carolina, and includes the tallest active sand dune system in the eastern United States. Jockey's Ridge contains three unique ecosystems: the Roanoke Sound, the dune system, and the maritime forest. Often when it rains, water collects near the bottom of the dunes creating temporary ponds known as vernal pools. Few fauna can be seen around the dunes, although some types of flora, such as tall grass, may be seen near the bottom of the dunes.
West Sounds id e Rd. To dunes AT LA NT IC OC Cr oa ta EA n N Hi gh wa y To Cape Hatteras Ridge Top enlarged above nd Trail aD r. St. RO AN e Sa OK k s in t h E S OU c Tra ND Legend 2 miles Ho llo we ll l 12 r ai Tra c dT San the in s k Accesible Parking Area Boardwalk Pavillion Hang Gliding Concession Picnic Shelter Hiking Trail Mountains-to-Sea State Trail Restrooms Hospital - Outer Banks Hospital Emergencies: Dial 911 Ca r o l i s t Roads Shrub forest Swimming Museum Visitor Center Observation Area Water Park Boundary Windsurfing/Kiteboarding Croatan Highwa y Park Gate Trails Soundside Nature Trail: This self-guided nature trail is approximately 0.75 mile long and will take about 1 hour to hike at a leisurely pace. This little-explored section of the park contains several different coastal environments, including a wetland area, grassy dunes and maritime thickets. Interpretive panels along the trail will provide you with information on the many plants and animals that call this area home. Please observe the soundside parking lot hours. 158 Tracks in the Sand Trail: The nature of shifting sand prevents the construction of traditional trails in the park. Tracks in the Sand is a 1.2-mile self-guided trail composed of 14 stations. Walked at a leisurely pace, the hike takes approximately 1.5 hours. The trail begins at the parking lot and meanders through the many environments in the park. North To Kill Devil Hills 0 1,000 2,000 feet 04/20 If you prefer a shorter adventure, a 360-foot boardwalk is located near the start of the Tracks in the Sand Trail. Interpretive displays along the route offer information about the plants and animals found in the area. A deck with benches is the perfect place to take photos or sit down and take in the sights and sounds.
Activities Jockey’s Ridge State Park is located in Nags Head in the Outer Banks. It is home to the Atlantic coast’s tallest living sand dune, which reaches heights of over 60 feet. The park covers 426 acres and is made of three unique ecosystems: the Roanoke Sound, the dune system and the maritime forest. It is a premier spot for kite flying, sandboarding and enjoying beautiful sunsets. Experience the Park! GPS: 35.9642, -75.633 Jockey’s Ridge State Park 300 W Carolista Drive, Nags Head, NC 27959 252-441-7132 jockeys.ridge@ncparks.gov Fun Facts You can find fulgurites, which are glass tubes formed when lightning hits the sand.* *If you find a fulgurite, please do not remove it from the park. • White-tailed deer • Brown pelican • Fox • Coyote • Osprey ■■ The park was established in 1975. ■■ The dunes were formed 3000-4000 years ago, and were historically an important landmark for mariners ■■ Dunes are an example of medano, which is a huge hill of shifting sand that lacks vegetation ■■ The dune acts as a huge sponge, pulling water from the underlying water table. Only the top layer (approximately 6 inches) of the dune remains dry and moves while the wet sand helps the dunes retain their shape. ■■ Jockey’s Ridge is an example of a back-barrier dune. This refers to the formation on the landward side of the Outer Banks where large volumes of sand were deposited by winds and waves. ■■ Jockey’s Ridge was once part of the back barrier dune system that reached to False Cape, Virginia. ■■ In 1973 portions of the dunes were slated to be flattened for residential development. Carolista Baum was instrumental in saving the dunes by planting herself in the path of the bulldozer to shut down the operation. ■■ In 1974 the dunes were declared a National Natural Landmark by the National Park Service. Due to the seasonal shift in wind direction, the dunes constantly change shape and size. Plant life in the maritime forest includes shrub thicket for vines, live oak and loblolly pines The year-round prevailing winds make Jockey’s Ridge a great place for kite and model plane flying and hang gliding ■■ Seven natural communities are documented within the park: dune grass, estuarine fringe pine forest, interdune marsh, live dune barren, maritime evergreen forest, maritime shrub, and tidal freshwater marsh. ncparks.gov MNQPV Legend says the name “Jockey’s Ridge” came from the early inhabitant’s practice of capturing and racing wild ponies in the area.
Pettigrew State Park South Mountains State Park – 2018 Park of the Year Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve North Carolina Division of Parks and Recreation manages more than 234,000 acres of iconic landscape across our state in our parks, recreation areas and natural areas with a mission dedicated to conservation, recreation and education. The state parks system welcomed more than 19 million visitors in 2017. Discover More with a Ranger Across North Carolina, state park rangers are proud of our parks and eager to welcome you and your family. Come to our parks to marvel at our state’s most beautiful natural resources, enjoy your favorite outdoor activities and learn about the rich science, culture and history that make our parks great. Fun facts about North Carolina State Parks ■■ There are 41 places to visit, including 34 parks, four recreation areas and three staffed state natural areas. ■■ The Division manages four state rivers, seven state lakes and six state trails. ■■ There are about 581 miles of trail to explore in our parks. ■■ The first state park created was Mount Mitchell State Park on March 3, 1915. Fort Macon State Park was the second. ■■ The Division celebrated 100 years of being Naturally Wonderful in 2016. ■■ Parks that welcome over 1 million visitors annually include: Jockey’s Ridge, Fort Macon and William B. Umstead state parks and Falls Lake, Jordan Lake and Kerr Lake state recreation areas. ■■ The Division employs over 1,000 people across the state. ■■ Some www.ncparks.gov M N P Q Roy Cooper Governor unique activities you can do in our parks include: wind surfing and hang gliding at Jockey’s Ridge State Park, cross country skiing and snow shoeing at Elk Knob State Park, driving on the four-wheel-drive beach at Fort Fisher State Recreation Area and rock climbing at Chimney Rock, Crowders Mountain, Hanging Rock, Pilot Mountain and Stone Mountain state parks. Susi H. Hamilton Secretary 75,000 copies of this public document were printed at a cost of $10,707.92 or $0.14 each. 03/18 Did you know that many plants atop Mount Mitchell are rare in North Carolina but common in Quebec? That the giant sand dunes at Jockey’s Ridge are constantly moving? Do you know how to safely hold a crayfish? From fishing lessons to astronomy programs and tree identification hikes to guided paddles, parks offer programs for all ages. Visit our website for a list of upcoming programs at each park. Junior Rangers The Junior Ranger program offers educational and skill-based activities to encourage children to explore the outdoors. Children can complete activity guides, geared for ages 6-12, and attend ranger programs to earn a junior ranger patch unique to each park. Ask about the program at a park office or download the guide at: www.ncparks.gov/junior-rangers. Environmental Education Learning Experiences Parks have their own curriculum guides that are correlated to the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. Competency goals in science, social studies, mathematics and English/language arts are available. Each program includes pre-visit, on-site and post-visit student activities that have measurable objectives, background information, vocabulary, references and step-bystep activity instructions. Passport Program How many state parks can you visit? Use your passport as a guide and collect stamps, earn prizes and make “Naturally Wonderful” memories! Pick up your passport at a state park near you. North Carolina State Parks 100-Mile Challenge Can you hike, bike or paddle 100 miles in a year? Join the N.C. State Parks’ 100-Mile Challenge and log your miles online to earn digital badges and redeem prizes as you reach various milestones! This is a great way to get outside, get moving and keep track of your activity. Visit www.nc100miles.org to sign up. ■■ Several parks have educational trails, called TRACK trails, that include activities for children to complete along the way. William B. Umstead State Park Jockey’s Ridge State Park Friends Of State Parks Join the Friends of State Parks to help support, promote and advocate for the parks system as a whole, or join the friends group of your favorite park. The group helps provide funding for Junior Ranger and Youth in Parks – Environmental Education programs, as well as grants for state parks projects. You can also make a donation to help keep our parks around for future generations. Learn more at www.ncfsp.org or www.ncparks.gov/support-your-parks. Merchandise Want to show your N.C. State Parks pride? Visit the online webstore and purchase products such as coffee mugs, prints, t-shirts, pins, patches and Christmas ornaments. This exclusive merchandise makes a great gift for special state parks fans, including yourself. www.ncparkstore.com N.C. State Parks License Plate Show your support for state parks every time you drive your vehicle! Purchase an N.C. State Parks license plate through the North Carolina Division of Motor Vehicl

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