Cabezon

Wilderness Study Area - New Mexico

Cabezon Peak’s dramatic volcanic formation is one of the most well known landmarks in northwest New Mexico. With an elevation of 7,785 feet, the Peak is part of the Mount Taylor volcanic field and is the largest of 50 volcanic necks rising from the Rio Puerco Valley. Dramatic basaltic cliffs on Cabezon provide a close view of an ancient volcano. To the south, the land rises sharply to Mesa Chivato, with cool pine forests and elevations over 8,000 feet. Mesa Chivato is composed of basaltic lava flows that erupted from Mount Taylor 3.3 to 1.5 million years ago. The colorful Cretaceous shoreline and marine rock layers expose lava cap ends and the elevation drops quickly to the Arroyo Chico to the north. The Rio Puerco flows through Cabezon Country, passing close by Cerro Cuate before making a dramatic bend to the south.

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Visitor Map of Chamisa Wilderness Study Area (WSA) in New Mexico. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Chamisa - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Chamisa Wilderness Study Area (WSA) in New Mexico. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

New Mexico Public Lands Recreation Guide. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).BLM New Mexico - Recreation Guide

New Mexico Public Lands Recreation Guide. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Cabezon WSA https://www.blm.gov/visit/cabezon-wsa https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cabezon_Peak Cabezon Peak’s dramatic volcanic formation is one of the most well known landmarks in northwest New Mexico. With an elevation of 7,785 feet, the Peak is part of the Mount Taylor volcanic field and is the largest of 50 volcanic necks rising from the Rio Puerco Valley. Dramatic basaltic cliffs on Cabezon provide a close view of an ancient volcano. To the south, the land rises sharply to Mesa Chivato, with cool pine forests and elevations over 8,000 feet. Mesa Chivato is composed of basaltic lava flows that erupted from Mount Taylor 3.3 to 1.5 million years ago. The colorful Cretaceous shoreline and marine rock layers expose lava cap ends and the elevation drops quickly to the Arroyo Chico to the north. The Rio Puerco flows through Cabezon Country, passing close by Cerro Cuate before making a dramatic bend to the south.
U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Cabezon Peak In case of emergency: Leave No Trace: Plan ahead and prepare - Travel and camp on durable surfaces - Dispose of waste properly - Leave what you find - Minimize campfire impacts - Respect wildlife - Be considerate of other visitors. BLM Rio Puerco Law Enforcement – 505/761-8700 Immediate Emergency – 911 BLM 24-hour Santa Fe Law Enforcement – 505/827-9377 BLM/NM/GI-06-05-1220 Bureau of Land Management Albuquerque District, Rio Puerco Field Office 100 Sun Ave. NE Pan American Bldg., Suite 330 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87109 505/761-8700 or www.blm.gov/new-mexico B reathe in all the mystic lore and outdoor adventure New Mexico has to offer, at this well-known landmark in the Rio Puerco Valley—Cabezon Peak. Rising nearly 8,000 feet above sea level, Cabezon is the most prominent of about 50 volcanic necks in the lava fields of Mount Taylor. Legend The name “Cabezon” is derived from the Spanish noun “cabeza,” meaning “head.” Cabezon translates as “big head.” The peak is believed to have religious significance for the Pueblo and Navajo Indians, and remnants of their visits still exist. The Navajos have various lore associated with Cabezon, one of which explains that the peak and local lava flows came from a giant who was slain upon Mount Taylor. The giant’s head became Cabezon Peak and his blood congealed to form the Malpais, or “bad land” volcanic flow to the south. Geology The region’s volcanic necks formed when molten lava worked its way to the earth’s surface through sedimentary rock layers deposited by an ancient inland sea that covered the area. Millions of years of erosion have removed much of the softer sedimentary rock, exposing the basalt columns or “necks.” Climbing Cabezon, rising nearly 2,000 feet above the valley floor, is a popular area for rock climbing and scrambling. A visitor’s register, located at the parking area, indicates that hikers come from as far away as Europe to experience a climb that is considered appropriate for both beginning and intermediate-level skills. The climb is not recommended for either children or pets. A dirt road located on the west side of Cabezon, which connects with BLM Road 1114, leads to the trailhead. A primitive trail along the south side of the peak, which leads to the summit (refer to the map), takes between 4 and 6 hours to climb. The round trip hike is approximately 2 ½ miles. The ascent of the chimney near the south-east portion is marked by cairns. A hand line (special rope used by climbers) may be needed to ascend the rocky ledges to the top. The trail is accessible year round, however, the upper trail and chimney can be treacherous when there is ice and snow. primitive recreation, including grazing, outfitting/guiding, commercial filming, group activities, educational group activities and scientific research. Vehicles Vehicle travel off existing roads is prohibited. Restrictions apply to all off-highway vehicles (OHV’s), all-terrain vehicles (ATV’s) motorcycles, and bicycles. Camping Unless authorized, camping, or occupying any site on public lands, for a period longer than 14 days within any period of 28 consecutive days is prohibited. Because of loose rock, we recommend that you wear a hard hat and sturdy footwear for safety; also, take along plenty of water. A successful climb to the summit will reward you with an expansive view of the Rio Puerco Valley. You may want to bring a compass and map to locate and identify surrounding land formations. Plants and Wildlife Piñon and juniper trees are dispersed among the rock-strewn foothills of the peak. The desert floor offers numerous grasses, cacti, and shrubs. Summer showers encourage the blooms of sunflower, cactus flowers, evening primroses and asters. Bird life at Cabezon includes meadow larks, jays, quail, doves, red-tailed hawks and sharp-shinned hawks. Area mammals include rabbits, prairie dogs, badgers, and rodents such as kangaroo rats, rock mice and pack rats. The elusive coyote is always present and serves to help keep the numbers of small mammals in balance. Hikers should be aware that rattlesnakes are active during warmer months. Fires Obey posted fire orders. No fires shall be left unattended. Fireworks are never allowed on public land. Access Entry into the area is best gained by turning westward from US 550 onto County Road 279 approximately 20 miles northwest of San Ysidro. A green highway sign (labeled “San Luis, Cabezon”) marks the turnoff. Continue 12 miles (south-west past the village of San Luis) to the Cabezon turn-off onto BLM Road 1114. The pavement ends just beyond San Luis. At the intersection of CR 279 and BLM Road 1114, you will pass by the ghost town of Cabezon. Follow BLM Road 1114 for 2.9 miles to the dirt route that leads east to the trailhead. Travel on CR 279 and BLM Road 1114 is good during dry conditions. During the rainy season, normally in spring and late summer, the roads can get slippery an
Alien Run Mountain Bike Trails NORTHWEST NEW MEXICO The 7,242-acre wilderness is in a badland area of rolling, water-carved clay hills. The area, rich in fossils, has yielded numerous specimens important to science. Alien Run Mountain Bike Trails Ojito Wilderness Alien Run consists of three looped mountain bike trails that cover more than 26 miles. The original loop and the Outer Limits Trail encircle a rumored UFO crash site. The trail features swooping flow trail, rim riding, slickrock sections, and tight turns through the piñon-juniper woodland. The Alien Run Outer Limits extension features rocky climbs and plunging downhills. The trail is known for including one of the largest selections of slickrock in New Mexico. Deep, meandering arroyos offer miles of terrain in which to wander amid canyons, cliffs, and some colorful geological formations. Summer monsoon rains often provide just enough rain to make this area flourish with blooming desert plants. Ah-Shi-Sle-Pah Wilderness Angel Peak Scenic Area Within this 10,000-acre area rises the scenic Angel Peak, at nearly 7,000 feet. A short nature trail leads to an overlook of blue and gray shale badlands formed from floodplains of ancient rivers. Angel Peak has three picnic areas with ADA accessible toilets. The campground has nine sites available for tent camping. There are ADA accessible restrooms. No drinking water or electrical hookups are available. Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness A favorite with photographers for its hoodoo formations, the wilderness is a remote, desolate area of steeply eroded and colorful badlands. Time and natural elements have created strange rock formations here and some of the most extraordinary scenery in New Mexico. Dunes Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Area More than 800 acres are available for off-highway vehicle (OHV) enthusiasts in this sand dune area. Glade Run Recreation Area The Glade Run Recreation Area offers many miles of motorized and nonmotorized trails through piñon-juniper woodland with sandstone bluffs, sandy arroyos, and badlands. Jeeps, utility-type vehicles (UTVs), all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), dirt bikes, mountain bikes, equestrians, and hikers will all find a place to play. Ten designated campsites are available at the Brown Springs Campground, which has shelters, picnic tables, campfire rings, two vault toilets, a group shelter with large grill, and a tot lot track for kids on dirt bikes or ATVs. Designated and dispersed camping in the recreation area requires a free permit from the BLM. The recreation area is known for its national class rock crawling, having hosted the Grand Nationals Rock Crawling Championships for many years. The oldest continuously held mountain bike race in the United States, the Road Apple Rally, also takes place here. Details are available in site descriptions or on the map side charts. Bring plenty of water for you and your pet. Many BLM sites do not offer facilities or drinking water. NM Statewide Recreation Brochure BLM/NM/GI-19/006+8000 Looking for a map, book, permit, or recommendation to explore your public lands? Visit the Public Lands Information Center at the BLM’s New Mexico State Office; 301 Dinosaur Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87508. Call (505) 954-2002 or (877) 276-9404 (toll free), or visit www.publiclands.org. Head Canyon Off-Highway Vehicle Recreation Area Follow us on: www.facebook.com/blmnewmexico www.facebook.com/blmlascruces www.youtube.com/blmnewmexico www.flickr.com/photos/blmnewmexico www.twitter.com/blmnewmexico Bureau of Land Management BLM New Mexico State Office 301 Dinosaur Trail Santa Fe, NM 87508 (505) 954-2000 www.blm.gov/new-mexico/recreation In the “Land of Enchantment,” the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) oversees outdoor recreation and many other activities on more than 13 million acres of public land. New Mexico’s public lands are diverse, encompassing high deserts, rugged lava flows, badlands, deep canyons, wild and scenic rivers, wilderness, and other distinctive landscapes. The majority of BLM-managed public land is open for recreational use, and opportunities abound for hiking, hunting, fishing, camping, horseback riding, off-roading, and other activities. The BLM also manages National Conservation Lands (NCLs), public lands with exceptional qualities. These special areas are managed to conserve and protect nationally significant landscapes recognized for their outstanding cultural, ecological, and scientific values. They also contain some of New Mexico’s most spectacular landscapes. New Mexico’s NCL units include four national monuments; two national conservation areas; three national scenic and historic trails; two wild and scenic rivers; 18 wilderness areas; and 47 wilderness study areas (WSAs). Those WSAs with legal public access are listed at the end of each mapback section. WSAs are places that are characterized by “naturalness” and that Congress is considering designating and protecting as wilderness—places that offer outstanding opportuni

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