"Sevilleta NWR" by Joel Deluxe , public domain

Sevilleta

National Wildlife Refuge - New Mexico

The Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge is located in the Chihuahuan desert 20 miles north of Socorro, New Mexico. The Rio Salado and the Rio Grande flow through the refuge. Most, but not all, of the refuge is off limits to the public and its development is left to nature. Use such as hiking and photography are permitted in some areas. There are over seven miles of trails open sunrise to sunset. Picnicking and camping are not permitted anywhere in the refuge.

maps

Official visitor map of Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Salinas Pueblo Missions - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Pocket Guide Map of Gila National Forest (NF) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Gila NF - Pocket Guide Map

Pocket Guide Map of Gila National Forest (NF) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

brochures

Brochure for Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Sevilleta - Brochure

Brochure for Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Trails brochure for Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Sevilleta - Trails

Trails brochure for Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Tear sheet for Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Sevilleta - Tear Sheet

Tear sheet for Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Sevilleta NWR https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Sevilleta/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sevilleta_National_Wildlife_Refuge The Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge is located in the Chihuahuan desert 20 miles north of Socorro, New Mexico. The Rio Salado and the Rio Grande flow through the refuge. Most, but not all, of the refuge is off limits to the public and its development is left to nature. Use such as hiking and photography are permitted in some areas. There are over seven miles of trails open sunrise to sunset. Picnicking and camping are not permitted anywhere in the refuge.
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge “…there was so much sky, more than at sea, more than anywhere else in the world. The plain was there, under one’s feet, but what one saw when one looked about was that brilliant blue world of stinging air and moving cloud.” Willa Cather Background, Los Piños Mountains and grasslands. Fishhook cactus. Welcome: Timeless Landscapes Thunderstorms roll across the mesas of Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). A rainbow sweeps across the vast blue sky to touch down on the banks of the Rio Grande. Bighorn sheep balance on sandstone cliffs above San Lorenzo Canyon, while the voices of hikers below echo through arches, caves, and wind-sculpted towers. This refuge has a special purpose that sets it apart from other national wildlife refuges across the country: To preserve and enhance the integrity and natural character of the ecosystems of the refuge. Sevilleta NWR, 50 miles south of Albuquerque, offers a rare chance to step back in time. Here, in a refuge that spans 360 square miles, it’s easy to imagine Piro Indians etching petroglyphs into rock hundreds of years ago. The geologic story exposed in the rocks gives clues to a volcanic past some 27 to 32 million years ago. Background, Piñon–Juniper biome. Visitors are welcome to explore several unique areas of Sevilleta NWR. Walk below sandstone arches in San Lorenzo Canyon. Listen and look for waterfowl in the wetlands. Marvel at the magnificent panorama from the Mesa View Trail. Please stop in the visitor center for the latest news on refuge trails, special tours and seasonal opportunities. Converging Ecosystems Like intersecting highways, four major biomes unite at Sevilleta NWR. Piñon–Juniper Woodlands intersect with the Colorado Plateau ShrubSteppe lands. The Chihuahuan Desert meets the Great Plains Grasslands. In select places, all four converge. To add to the stunning diversity, the largest river in New Mexico, the Rio Grande, bisects the immense landscape of Sevilleta NWR, a lifeline for migrating birds and corridor for wildlife. What’s a Biome? A biome is a large area with characteristically similar climate, plants, and animals. Research on the Refuge Nature’s junctions often buzz with activity, as in high traffic areas, the wildlife and plants interact in fascinating ways. Sevilleta NWR is a mecca for scientific study of these significant meeting points. Sevilleta NWR is host to the University of New Mexico’s Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, initiated in 1988 and one of only 26 sites across the country. The Refuge hosts a diverse array of research projects conducted by researchers from around the globe. History Origins of Sevilleta The name Sevilleta (pronounced Sev-ee-eta) illustrates the strong Spanish influence in this region. When explorer Juan de Oñate swept northward from Mexico in 1598, he encountered a civilized Rio Grande, with large pueblos by the river. Here, the Piro Indians farmed, hunted, and lived in complex societies. Oñate called the Piro Pueblo nearest what is now the refuge, “Pueblo Nueva Sevilla,” in honor of the Spanish city of Seville. Over the span of 200 years of Spanish rule, the Piros eventually fled south. At the end of the Spanish Occupation, in 1819, the area became the Sevilleta de La Joya Land Grant. In 1821, it fell under Mexico's authority, then in 1848, it came under the control of the United States. After New Mexico gained statehood, Socorro County bought the land in a public sale in 1928. Background, Los Piños Mountains. Campbell Ranch Legacy General Thomas Campbell bought the land in 1936 and for the next 30 years, cattle and sheep grazed across the desert, steppe land and forest. Shortly before his death, the general formed the Campbell Family Foundation in 1966 to assure the land’s stewardship. Within a few years, the foundation took a bold step. Why not protect the land permanently as a place where natural ecosystems thrive? The Nature Conservancy acquired the land from the foundation in 1973, marking the first New Mexico project for the nonprofit land conservation organization. After conveying the ranch to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the conservancy remains a partner today. Restoring Nature At first glance, the Sevilleta NWR landscape appears as pristine as it was centuries ago. However, cattle ranching combined with drought and invasive species took their toll on native plants and animals. Staff and volunteers today work hard to return native plants, natural processes, and wildlife to the refuge. They remove salt cedar and other invasive plants that threaten the survival of native vegetation. They replant native shrubs and grasses, guide water into managed wetlands, and carefully prescribe burns to bring back fire as a natural force. Invasive Species Also called tamarisk, the non-native salt cedar monopolizes the water that native plants need in a dry land. It crowds out other shrubs, increases sa
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Trails at Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge of the refuge. Along the way, this moderate-to-strenuous hike passes many awe-inspiring geologic landforms. Look for sparrows in the winter, millipedes in the summer and lizards most seasons! Wildflower Loop This paved ¼-mile loop trail begins just east of the Visitor Center and is a great place to see native plant species, including many beautiful blooms while in season. Along the trail you can enjoy the scenic views of the Rio Grande Valley and surrounding mountains. This easy hike is a nice way to stretch your legs! Nature Loop This 1.1-mile loop is located just south of the Visitor Center and is a wonderful way to get acquainted with the refuge! Follow the sandy rock lined path into arroyos, past several benches with excellent views and up a few hills. While on this moderate hike, keep an eye out for quail, rabbit and lizards as well as coyote and deer tracks! Mesa View Trail Trail head is located on the northwest side of the Visitor Center. This 3.8-mile trail immerses you in the beautiful New Mexican landscape. This trail skirts around the edge of the mesa before climbing to the top, providing far reaching views of both the east and west sides Ladrones Vista Trail This 1.9-mile trail connects with the Mesa View and Nature Loop Trails. Explore this rock lined path through arroyos and up the side of the mesa. Along the way you will marvel at the beauty of Sevilleta, the Ladrones and middle Rio Grande Valley. While exploring this moderate-tostrenuous trail keep your eyes peeled for birds, lizards and insects on this diverse trail! 5. Pets must be on leash or under control. 6. Visitors are prohibited from being under the influence of intoxicating beverages or controlled substances. 7. Possession or use of alcohol is prohibited on the refuge. 8. Follow the posted signs to stay on trail. Emergency Response Procedures General Information New Mexico weather can change suddenly. Keep an eye on the sky and watch for lightning and developing severe weather conditions. Rules and Regulations Come prepared for changing conditions with these essentials: sunglasses, sunscreen, a hat, water, sturdy shoes, and a first aid kit. Depending on the season, you may need rain gear or extra layers of clothing. 1. Please stay on designated trails and obey posted signs. 2. Use caution when crossing on roads. Yield to For medical attention—Please call 911 approaching vehicles. 3. Observe wildlife from a safe distance. Young animals should be left alone. 4. Help protect resources. All plants, wildlife, and cultural features on the refuge are protected and it is illegal to remove them. For Additional Information Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge P.O. Box 1248 Socorro, NM 87801 505/864-4021 505/864-7761 Fax June 2018 Top left, Cowpen Daisy Left, Collared Lizard Top right, Cholla All images USFWS U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Hiking Trails at Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge Trails Map Nature Loop Mesa View Trail Entry Gate/ Pedestrian Gate W p He ad qu ar te rs Ro ad Wildflower Loop (.25 Miles) Blue Frame Nature Loop (1.1 Miles) Green Frame Mesa View Trail (3.8 Miles) W Bench Visitor Center 25 0 0 0.5 Kilometers Scale applies to main map 0.5 Miles Wildflower Loop W Head quar ters Road W Entry Gate/ Pedestrian Gate p Hea dqu arte rs Roa d
U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge Welcome: Timeless Landscapes Visitors are welcome at Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge! Experience the timeless beauty of Sevilleta NWR. Thunderstorms roll across the enchanted mesas. A rainbow sweeps across the vast blue sky to touch down on the banks of the Rio Grande. Bighorn sheep balance on sandstone cliffs above San Lorenzo Canyon, while the voices of hikers below echo through arches, caves, and windsculpted towers. Here, in a refuge that spans 360 square miles, it’s easy to imagine Piro Indians etching petroglyphs into rock hundreds of years ago. The geologic story exposed in the rocks gives clues to a volcanic past some 27 to 32 million years ago. Converging Ecosystems This refuge has a special purpose that sets it apart from other national wildlife refuges across the country: To preserve and enhance the integrity and natural character of the ecosystems of the refuge. Like intersecting highways, four major biomes unite at Sevilleta NWR. Piñon–Juniper Woodlands intersect with the Colorado Plateau Shrub–Steppe lands. The Chihuahuan Desert meets the Great Plains Grasslands. In select places, all four converge. For More Information Contact Refuge Manager Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge P.O. Box 1248 Socorro, New Mexico 87801 505/864-4021 505/864-7761 FAX www.fws.gov/refuge/sevilleta/ January 2015 To add to the stunning diversity, the largest river in New Mexico, the Rio Grande, bisects the immense landscape of Sevilleta NWR, a lifeline for migrating birds and corridor for wildlife. Research on the Refuge Look for beaver tracks in the mud. Listen for ducks, geese, herons and sandhill cranes, especially from November to February. In summer, turtles bask on logs in water, roadrunners dart out from tall grasses, and hawks soar overhead. Sevilleta NWR hosts a diverse array of research projects conducted by researchers from across the globe. The University of New Mexico manages a Field Station and Laboratory on the refuge to support these scientists in their field work. Hunting The Refuge offers dove and waterfowl hunting in the wetlands. Only nontoxic shot is permitted. Please check with the refuge staff for rules and regulations. Things to Do at the Refuge Visitor Center and Refuge Hours Exhibits and Trails Exhibits in the Visitor Center feature the cultural history, biological diversity, geology, and latest news on scientific studies and findings at the refuge. Outside the visitor center, stretch your legs on the Mesa View, Nature Loop, and Wildflower Loop trails, where you can observe native plants and wildlife. Biologists, geologists and other refuge experts lead guided tours throughout the year. Education programs can be scheduled for groups in advance. San Lorenzo Canyon Geologic Journey Millions of years of earth’s history unfold in San Lorenzo Canyon. Whimsical sculpted sandstones and mudstones give clues to past upheavals. A popular destination for hikers, the canyon offers outstanding photography opportunities. Life Giving Waters: Sevilleta Wetlands Visit Sevilleta’s wetlands for a firsthand look at a success story for wildlife. Seasonally flooding these lands near the Rio Grande recreates wetlands that were once extensive in the river valley. Visitor Center and Refuge hours vary by season, please call or check website prior to your visit. Come prepared for unpredictable weather with hat, sunglasses, water, and layers of clothing. Summer temperatures can soar to 100 degrees and then cool down considerably at night; you can expect early afternoon monsoon rains from early July into September. Winter temperatures can be cold and skies are frequently clear; at night, the temperatures can often drop below freezing. You can expect an occasional skiff of snow. You can do your part to preserve Sevilleta NWR for wildlife and people by obeying the following rules: Drive only on designated roads. Remain on refuge trails. Do not disturb or remove wildlife, vegetation, rocks or historic objects. Keep pets under control at all times Photographs from left to right, Ladrone Peak. Gunnison’s Prairie Dog. San Lorenzo Canyon. Brown Bear. Breadloaf at San Lorenzo Canyon All Photographs / USFWS U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Ladron Peak 25 60 Rio ns tai Mo FE Rio SAN TA do Pinos s AND Cerro Pelon Lo H ATC Sala TOPEKA r ones q La Joya Cerro Montoso N I SO Lad Rio de un Puerco Sier ra G n ra Waterfowl Management Area San Lorenzo Canyon Red Mt. San Acacia Mesa del Yeso 25 1400 Polvadera Polvadera Mt. Sevilleta NWR Facts Lemitar 251 Birds Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge N Socorro Peak 89 Mammals 58 Reptiles 15 Amphibians 0 2 4 6 Miles 8th largest NWR in lower 48 Top, Los Pinos Mountains. Middle, Roadrunner. Bottom, Hedgehog cactus. All photographs / USFWS Socorro Get the free m ob ile ap p at

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