by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

District Maps and Guides

The Maze Trails and Roads

brochure District Maps and Guides - The Maze Trails and Roads

Brief overview of the trails and four-wheel-drive roads in The Maze. Includes district map. Also includes Orange Cliffs Unit of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Published by the U.S National Park Service (NPS).

Canyonlands National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Canyonlands National Park The Maze and Orange Cliffs Unit Destination Getting to The Maze People using a GPS to get to The Maze can get lost. Use a map to find your way. From UT 24, turn east just south of the Goblin Valley State Park turnoff. Take the two-wheeldrive dirt road 46 miles (76 km) southeast to Hans Flat Ranger Station. Other four-wheel-drive routes also lead into the area. Road conditions can change quickly. For road conditions: go.nps.gov/canyroads or call 435-259-2652, 8 am–4:30 pm. Driving time from Hans Flat Chimney Rock Cleopatras Chair The Doll House Ekker Butte Flint Seep Golden Stairs Green River (via 24) Green River (dirt road) Happy Canyon Hanksville High Spur Hite (via 4WD road) Horseshoe Canyon Maze Overlook Millard Canyon Moab The Neck North Point Panorama Point Standing Rock Sunset Pass Teapot Rock The Wall 5 hours 2 hours 6 hours 4 hours 45 minutes 1.5 hours 2 hours 2.5 hours 1 hour 1.5 hours 45 minutes 5-6 hours 1 hour 3 hours 6 hours 3 hours 1 hour 15 minutes 2 hours 5 hours 3 hours 3 hours 5 hours Introduction For More Information Because of its isolation and challenging roads, The Maze is the least visited district of Canyonlands National Park. Travel to The Maze requires the right vehicle, more time, and a greater degree of self-sufficiency. You should be prepared for self-rescue. Most people spend at least three days at The Maze, but trips can easily last a week. Canyonlands National Park The Maze Hans Flat Ranger Station phone 435-259-2652 Note: Unless it is an emergency, please call only 8 am–4:30 pm. website go.nps.gov/themaze The Orange Cliffs Unit of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area shares Canyonlands’ western boundary and is administered under the same backcountry management plan and reservation system. Regulations are the same for The Maze and Orange Cliffs, though they differ in the rest of Glen Canyon. Hiking Trails Trails in The Maze are steep, unmarked, and minimally maintained. Route finding may be difficult. The Maze Overlook Trail and other routes in the district require basic climbing maneuvers in order to negotiate sections of steep slickrock and pour-offs. A 25-foot (7.6 m) length of rope is often essential for raising or lowering packs in difficult spots. If you have a fear of heights, many routes may make you uncomfortable. Routes into the canyons have a few cairns from mesa top to canyon bottom, but routes in washes are not marked. Many of the canyons look alike and are difficult to identify without a topographic map. Backcountry Reservations Canyonlands National Park Reservation Office 2282 Resource Blvd. Moab, UT 84532 phone 435-259-4351 website go.nps.gov/canybackcountry Four-Wheel-Drive Roads Most routes begin at trailheads along four-wheel-drive roads. If you have a twowheel-drive vehicle, you may park at the North Point Road junction, approximately 2.5 miles (4 km) southeast of Hans Flat Ranger Station, and hike to Maze Overlook via North Trail Canyon. Depending on your vehicle, you may also be able to negotiate the 14-mile road (22 Hans Flat Ranger Station is two hours from Green River, Utah. From I-70, take UT 24 south for 24 miles (38 km). A left turn just beyond the Goblin Valley State Park turnoff will take you along a two-wheel-drive dirt road 46 miles (76 km) southeast to the ranger station. This road may require four-wheel drive after wind or rain. In addition, a four-wheeldrive route leads north from UT 95 near Hite. Do not use GPS to find your way; use a map instead. The ranger station is open daily 8 am–4:30 pm. km) to park at the top of the Flint Trail, then hike to Land of Standing Rocks. Overnight trips require a permit, which you can reserve in advance. Backpackers stay in atlarge zones. There are several reliable springs in the canyons of The Maze. Inquire at Hans Flat Ranger Station for more information. Four-wheel driving in The Maze is extremely difficult, presents considerable risk of vehicle damage, and should not be attempted by inexperienced drivers. You must have a highclearance, four-wheel-drive vehicle for all Maze backcountry roads. ATVs and OHVs are prohibited. The Flint Trail traverses slopes of clay that are extremely slippery when wet. The Flint Trail is often closed in winter. The road between Teapot Rock camp and Land of Standing Rocks is the most difficult in The Maze, with additional clearance or locking differentials highly recommended. You should be prepared to make basic road or vehicle repairs and should carry the following items: at least one full-size spare tire, extra gas, extra water, a shovel, a high-lift jack, and chains for all four tires between October and April. Protect Your Park • Pets are not allowed on hiking trails or on four-wheel-drive roads, even in a vehicle. • Do not enter, alter, damage, or deface archeological sites. Do not collect artifacts. • All vehicles and bicycles must stay on designated roads. • ATVs and OHVs are not permitted. • Protect biological soil crusts by staying on trails and roads. • Wood fires are prohibited. Printed by Canyonlands Natural History Association 1m, 3/18 EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA All overnight trips require a permit, which you can reserve in advance. Backcountry vehicle campers and mountain bike groups must stay in designated sites and must provide their own toilet systems. Vehicle sites do not have any toilets or picnic tables. Protect Yourself • Drink one gallon of water (4 L) each day. • Always carry a topo map, adequate clothing, and a flashlight. • Remain in one place if you become lost or separated from a group. • Flash floods can occur without warning. Never cross a canyon that is flooding. • During a lightning storm avoid lone trees, cliff edges, and high ridges. Return to your vehicle if possible. • Be careful near cliff edges, especially when rock surfaces are wet or icy.

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