by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Waterton-Glacier Guide

2019

brochure Waterton-Glacier Guide - 2019
Glacier National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Offcial Summer 2019 Newspaper Sunset over the Livingston Range as seen from Going-to-the-Sun Road. Follow us @GlacierNPS Crown of the Continent Want Glacier to feature you? Posting about conservation, Leave No Trace, and safety helps spread and Welcome to Glacier National Park, one of the crown jewels of the National Park System. The combination of natural wonders, cultural history, and our shared border with Waterton Lakes National Park, in Canada, contributed to Glacier being recognized, worldwide, as a World Heritage Site, a Biosphere Reserve, the World’s frst International Peace Park, and the World’s frst International Dark Sky Park. No matter how long your visit we hope you discover your own special aspect of this spectacular landscape. Glacier has a short season and a visit will take a bit of planning. Throughout the summer congestion can be an issue and some areas of the park may have access restricted temporarily due to crowding. The best plan is to get an early start. Parking areas fll early. Unseasonable snowfall or wildland fres may impact your plans. Have a backup itinerary, in case your frst choice is already full or crowded. While in Montana you may wish to visit other, less well known, areas of the National Park System. Check on page 13 for options throughout the state. support the mission of the National Park Service. Use #ProtectGlacier on posts about these topics and we might feature you. Consider the negative impacts a location geotag might have on a sensitive environment before posting. What do your images portray? You might like to free-solo up mountains without a helmet or whitewater raft without a life jacket, but be cautious about promoting dangerous activities without context. Do you have a permit for that? Commercial services are carefully regulated in national parks because no one wants to see these wild places overrun with advertising. Product ambassadors, brand infuencers, and other marketers need a commercial Many people are starting to reconsider the way they use social media in wild places; learn more in the side bar to the right. Help Stop Aquatic Invasive Species photography permit. Table of Contents General and Camping Information .........2 Services and Facilities Dates & Hours ......3 Bear Safety & Regulations ......................4 Wildlife & Safety Tips .............................5 Glacier National Park protects the headwaters of North America and preserving the park’s famously clean waters is essential to our mission. All watercraft must be inspected before launching. Motorized boats are subject to a 30-day drying time prior to launching. Motorized or trailered watercraft are prohibited from launching on all waters except Lake McDonald. Driving & Bicycling Information ..............6 Points of Interest....................................7 Hiking Information & Trail Maps..........8-9 Glacier’s Offcial Partners ................10-11 Saving the Park’s Glaciers.....................12 Montana’s Other National Parks...........13 Clean Your Boat Inside and Out Clean all plants, animals, sand, mud, and other debris from your boat, trailer, anchor, boots, and equipment as soon as you leave one body of water. This includes, but is not limited to, canoes, kayaks, sailboats, paddleboards, and foat tubes. Drain Your Boat Inside and Out Drain all the water from your boat, including the motor, bilge, live-well, and other compartments before you arrive in the park. Leave the bilge plug out during transport. Do not dump water or organisms from one water body into another. Dry Your Boat Inside and Out Dry all compartments and equipment in the sun for at least fve days before entering another body of water or use high-pressure, hot (120 to 140 F) water to clean your boat, trailer, waders, boots, and equipment. In Waterton National Park Private motorized and trailer launched boats are only permitted on Upper and Middle Waterton Lakes after a 90-day quarantine period evidenced by a seal attached at the Waterton marina. For more information on this program, visit: https://id4waterton.ca/. All non-motorized hand launched watercraft require a selfcertifcation permit available at park ofces and at popular launch areas (includes small boats powered by wind or humans, like canoes, kayaks, paddleboards, windsurfers, and rowboats). Flotation devices such as foat tubes do not require a permit. Since the permit is a legal requirement, park wardens will check for permits and will take appropriate action as necessary. Glacier’s Neighbors ..............................14 In 2018, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. Americans called for this legislation to protect the nation’s rivers when they were most vulnerable. Boat Inspection Locations & Hours Lake McDonald* May 11–May 25..................... 7 am–5 pm May 26–Oct. 31..................... 7 am–9 pm Waterton Lakes National Park ..............15 Map and International Travel................16 This publication is made possible by the Glacier National Park Conservancy. Parking lot across the street from the Apgar boat ramp North Fork There are no inspection stations located in the North Fork. Boaters traveling to the North Fork must visit the Lake McDonald inspection station prior to launch. Many Glacier Ranger Station June 1–Sept. 28 ................ 7 am–4:30 pm St. Mary Visitor Center June 1–Sept. 28 ................ 7 am–4:30 pm Two Medicine Ranger Station* June 1–Sept. 28 ................ 7 am–4:30 pm *Offers motorized boat inspections and seals Please Recycle Entrance Fees Dates and Hours of Operation Contact Us Seven Day Passes Apgar Visitor Center www.nps.gov/glac PO Box 128, West Glacier, MT 59936 406-888-7800 Vehicle pass ............................................. $35 Backcountry Permits May 11–June 7 ........................9 am–4:30 pm Hikers planning to camp overnight in Glacier’s Motorcycle pass ....................................... $30 June 8–Sept. 2 ..............................8 am–6 pm backcountry must obtain a backcountry Individual pass.......................................... $20 Sept. 3–Oct. 14 .............................8 am–5 pm camping permit. Permits cost $7 per person per Annual & Lifetime Passes Glacier Annual Pass .................................. $70 Interagency Annual Pass........................... $80 Apgar Nature Center night, and are issued no more than 24 hours in June 15–August 25 .....................10 am–4 pm Logan Pass Visitor Center Senior Annual Pass (62+).......................... $20 Not before June 22–Sept. 2...........9 am–7 pm Senior Lifetime Pass (62+)......................... $80 Sept. 3–Sept. 29 ......................9:30 am–4 pm Special Free Passes Access Pass .............................................. Free (for permanently disabled U.S. citizens) Fourth Grade Pass .................................... Free (free for currently enrolled fourth grade students) Military Pass ............................................. Free Apgar Backcountry Permit Center May 1–May 31 ..............................8 am–4 pm Many Glacier Ranger Station June 1–Sept. 30 .......................7 am–4:30 pm May 26–Sept. 29......................7 am–4:30 pm Park Headquarters (closed holidays) May 26–Sept. 27......................7 am–4:30 pm Polebridge Ranger Station May 26–Sept. 29...........................9 am–4 pm St. Mary Visitor Center (for qualifying active duty military and their May 24–June 15 ......................8 am–4:30 pm June 16–Sept. 2 ............................8 am–6 pm May 26–Sept. 29......................9 am–4:30 pm St. Mary Visitor Center May 26–Sept. 27......................7 am–4:30 pm Two Medicine Ranger Station Sept. 3–October 6 .........................8 am–5 pm Waterton Lakes National Park, in Canada, has June 1–Sept. 27 .......................7 am–4:30 pm Two Medicine Ranger Station June 1–Sept. 27 .......................7 am–4:30 pm separate entrance fees. Pets & Service Animals Pets are permitted in campgrounds, along roads, and in parking areas, but must be on a 6’ or shorter leash, or caged. Pets cannot be left unattended, and are not permitted on trails, in the backcountry, or in any building. Taking a service animal into the backcountry requires a safety briefng, obtained at most backcountry permit stations. When visiting frontcountry attractions (i.e. Trail of the Cedars, boardwalk section of Hidden Lake Trail, etc.) the safety briefng is recommended, but not required. In an emergency, dial 911 and contact a ranger or other park employee. October 1–October 31 ..................8 am–4 pm Many Glacier Ranger Station Monday–Friday.........................8 am–4:30 pm Polebridge Ranger Station dependents) Special fees are charged for commercial vehicles. Emergency advance. Stations may be closed during lunch. Firearms The possession of loaded frearms in Glacier National Park is legal, however, discharging frearms is prohibited. Firearms are prohibited in federal facilities. Learn specifcs at: dojmt.gov/ features/frequently-asked-frearmsquestions/ No Drone Zone Fishing Accessible Trails Launching, landing, or operating an unmanned aircraft (or drone) within the boundaries of Glacier National Park is prohibited and subject to receiving a fne and/or confscation of your aircraft. A fshing license is not required to fsh most waters in the park. The Middle and North Forks of the Flathead River require a State of Montana fshing license. The standard fshing season for all waters in the park is from the third Saturday in May through November 30. Lakes are open year-round. Several bodies of water are either closed to fshing or are catch-and-release only. Use of live bait and lead of any kind is prohibited. For complete regulations, stop by any visitor center or visit online: go.nps.gov/fshing Accessible trails and walking paths help more people explore Glacier National Park. Here are a few suggestions: the Running Eagle Falls Nature Trail, in the Two Medicine Valley; the Trail of the Cedars, at Avalanche Creek; the frst 1/2 mile of the Swiftcurrent Nature Trail, in the Many Glacier Valley; and the Animal Superpowers walking path, behind the Logan Pass Visitor Center. For more information, visit go.nps.gov/ accessibility or talk to a ranger. Drones create disruptions for wildlife, encroach on the environmental and scenic values of others, and generate a signifcant safety concern. Camping Information Camping is permitted only in designated campgrounds. Utility hookups are not available. Flush Disposal Toilets Station Hiker Biker For Larger RVs and Additional Information Dates Fee Sites Individual Sites (up to eight people) Most campgrounds operate on a frst-come, frst-served basis with varying fees (see table). Visitors may make advanced reservations for sites at the Fish Creek and St. Mary Campgrounds and half of the Many Glacier Campground for $23 per night. Reservations may be made through the National Park Service Reservation Service at recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Apgar April 26–Oct. 6 $20 192 Yes Yes Yes The largest 25 sites have a maximum parking space of 40’. Primitive camping is available after listed dates. Avalanche June 21–Sept. 15 $20 87 Yes No Yes The largest 50 sites have a maximum parking space of 26’. Bowman Lake May 17–Sept. 8 $15 48 No No No Campground is accessible by dirt road. Vehicles and vehicle combinations longer than 21’ are not allowed. Primitive camping is available after listed dates. Cut Bank May 31–Sept. 15 $10 19 No No No Campground is accessible by dirt road, maximum parking space 21’. Primitive camping only, no potable water. Group Sites (9 to 24 people) Fish Creek May 31–Sept. 1 $23 180 Yes Yes Yes The largest 18 sites have a maximum parking space of 35’. 62 additional sites will accommodate up to 27’. Kintla Lake June 7–Sept. 8 $15 13 No No Yes Logging Creek June 28–Sept. 22 $10 13 No No No Many Glacier May 24–Sept. 22 $23 110 Yes Yes Yes The largest 13 sites have a maximum parking space of 35’. Primitive camping is available after listed dates. Quartz Creek June 28–Oct. 27 $10 7 No No No Campground is accessible by dirt road. Vehicles and vehicle combinations longer than 21’ are not allowed. Primitive camping only, no potable water. Rising Sun June 7–Sept. 8 $20 84 Yes Yes Yes The largest 10 sites have a maximum parking space of 25’. Sprague Creek May 10–Sept. 15 $20 25 Yes No Yes No towed units. Some sites have a maximum parking space of 21’. St. Mary April 19–Oct. 31 $23 148 Yes Yes Yes Three sites up to 40’ and 22 sites up to 35’. Primitive camping is available after listed dates. Two Medicine May 31–Sept. 22 $20 100 Yes Yes Yes The largest 10 sites have a maximum parking space of 35’. Primitive camping is available after listed dates. Five of the 10 group sites at Apgar Campground, two group sites at Many Glacier Campground, and the one group site at Two Medicine Campground operate on a frst-come frstserved basis. These non-reservable group sites are a fat nightly rate of $60. Visitors may make advanced reservations for fve of the 10 group sites at Apgar Campground, and the two group sites at St. Mary Campground. There is a fat nightly fee of $65 for group reservation sites. Discounts do not apply for group sites. Group sites can accommodate 9 to 24 people. Reservations may be made through the National Park Service Reservation Service at recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Hiker-Biker Campsites The park has designated sites for campers arriving by nonmotorized means, such as hiking or bicycle (not motorcycles/ motorbikes). There is a $5 per night per person fee ($8 at reservation campgrounds for the frst person in the group, $5 for every person in the group after that). Non-related parties may share the site up to the maximum site capacity. Campers arriving by non-motorized means who do not want to share a Hiker/Biker site will be required to move to a regular site and pay the full nightly camping fee. 2 Waterton-Glacier Guide Campfres Campground is accessible by dirt road. Vehicles and vehicle combinations longer than 21’ are not allowed. Primitive camping is available after listed dates. Campground is accessible by dirt road. Vehicles and vehicle combinations longer than 21’ are not allowed. Primitive camping only, no potable water. Campfres are permitted only in designated campgrounds and picnic areas where fre rings are provided. Collecting frewood is prohibited except along the Inside North Fork Road from Dutch Creek to Kintla Lake, and along the Bowman Lake Road. Only dead and down wood may be collected. Services and Facilities Apgar Lake McDonald Many Glacier Rising Sun Two Medicine Other Services Lodging Village Inn Motel Apgar Village Lodge May 22..............Sept. 30 May 17 ..............Sept. 22 Call 855-733-4522 for advance reservations or (406) 888-5632 for same day reservations. Call 844-868-7474 for reservations. Food Service Eddie’s Cafe Mid-May .........Mid-Sept. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner Campstore/Gift Shops Eddie’s Mercantile The Cedar Tree Schoolhouse Gifts Montana House Mid-May ....... Mid-Sept. May 18 ..............Sept. 23 Mid-May ..........Mid-Oct. Open all year Horseback Rides Apgar Corral May 18 ................ Sept. 2 Call local 406-387-4405 or toll free 877-888-5557 for schedule and information. Boat Rentals Glacier Park Boat Co. May 25 ................ Sept. 2 Small boat rentals including rowboats, paddleboards, canoes, single and double kayaks, and 10hp motors. Hours: May 25 - June 15, 10 am - 6 pm (last rental out at 5 pm) June 16 - Labor Day, 9 am to 7 pm (last rental out at 6 pm) Outdoor Store Glacier Outftters May 1 ................Sept. 30 Gear for water recreation, camping, hiking and fshing, fshing tackle ane gifts. 406-219-7466 Lodging Lake McDonald Lodge Motel Lake McDonald May 17 ..............Sept. 25 June 7................ Sept. 15 Call 855-733-4522 for advance reservations or 406-888-5431 for same day reservations. Call 844-868-7474 for advance reservations. Food Service Russell’s Fireside Dining Room Jammer Joe’s Grill & Pizzeria Lucke’s Lounge May 17 ..............Sept. 25 Lake McDonald Lodge - breakfast, lunch, and dinner June 8.................. Sept. 7 Lunch and dinner May 17 ..............Sept. 25 Lake McDonald Lodge - opens 11:30 am daily for lunch and dinner Campstore/Gift Shops Lodge Campstore Lodge Gift Shop May 10 ..............Sept. 25 May 17 ..............Sept. 25 Groceries, fshing and camping supplies, frewood, and gifts Souvenirs, gifts, books, locally made art, and pottery Scenic Boat Tours Glacier Park Boat Co. May 18 ..............Sept. 22 Narrated tours of Lake McDonald - 1 hour. Daily tours at 11 am, 1:30 pm, 3 pm, 5:30 pm, and 7 pm. After Labor Day, 1:30 pm, 3 pm, and 5:30 pm tours only. Rowboat, double kayaks, paddleboards and 8hp motorboat rentals available 10 am to 8 pm daily (last rental out at 7 pm). After Labor Day, boat rentals available 12 pm to 6:30 pm (last rental out at 5:30 pm). Call 406-257-2426 for information. Horseback Rides Lake McDonald Corral May 25 ..............Sept. 22 Call local 406-387-4405 or toll free 877-888-5557 for schedule and information. Lodging Many Glacier Hotel Swiftcurrent Motor Inn June 7................ Sept. 17 June 11.............. Sept. 15 Call 855-733-4522 for advance reservations or 406-732-4411 for same day reservations. Call 855-733-4522 for advance reservations or 406-732-5531 for same day reservations. Food Service Ptarmigan Dining Room Swiss Lounge ‘Nell’s Heidi’s June 7................ Sept. 17 June 7................ Sept. 17 June 11.............. Sept. 15 June 7................ Sept. 17 Many Glacier Hotel - breakfast, lunch, and dinner Many Glacier Hotel - opens 11:30 am daily for lunch and dinner Swiftcurrent Motor Inn - breakfast, lunch, and dinner Many Glacier Hotel - hot and cold snacks, sandwiches, coffee, beer, and wine Campstore/Gift Shops June 11.............. Sept. 15 June 7................ Sept. 17 Groceries, fshing and camping supplies, frewood, and gifts Many Glacier Hotel - souvenirs, gifts, books, and locally made Blackfeet art Scenic Boat Tours Swiftcurrent Campstore Many Glacier Hotel Gift Shop Glacier Park Boat Co. June 8................ Sept. 15 Narrated tours of Swiftcurrent Lake and Lake Josephine - 1 hour 30 minutes. Requires 1/4 mile hike over hill between lakes. Daily tours begin June 8 at 9 am, 11 am, 2 pm, and 4:30 pm. Additional tours at 1 pm and 3 pm begin July 1. Optional guided walks to Grinnell Lake are included on the 9 am and 2 pm tours. An 8:30 am tour with a guided hike to Grinnell Glacier begins mid-July, trail conditions permitting. Rowboat, canoe, and kayak rentals available from 8:30 am to 6 pm (last rental out at 5 pm) between June 8 and June 30. Between July 1 and July 15 rentals are available between 8:30 am and 7 pm. Between July 16 and September 3 rentals are available between 8 am and 7 pm. Between September 4 and September 15 rentals are available between 8 am and 6 pm. Call 406-257-2426 for more information. Horseback Rides Many Glacier Corral June 8................ Sept. 15 Call local 406-387-4405 or toll free 877-888-5557 for schedule and information. Laundry and Showers Swiftcurrent Motor Inn June 11.............. Sept. 15 Purchase tokens at the campstore. Lodging Rising Sun Motor Inn June 14................ Sept. 9 Call 855-733-4522 for advance reservations or 406-732-5523 for same day reservations. Food Service Two Dog Flats Grill June 14................ Sept. 9 Breakfast, lunch, and dinner Campstore/Gift Shops Rising Sun Motor Inn June 14................ Sept. 9 Groceries, fshing and camping supplies, frewood, and gifts Scenic Boat Tours Glacier Park Boat Co. June 15................ Sept. 2 Narrated tours of Saint Mary Lake begin June 15 - 1 hour and 30 minutes includes stop at Baring Falls. Daily tours at 10 am, 12 pm, 2 pm, and 4 pm. One hour tours at 6:30 pm with no stop at Baring Falls. Optional ranger-led walks to St. Mary Falls included on the 10 am and 2 pm tours. Call 406-257-2426 for information. Showers Rising Sun Motor Inn June 14................ Sept. 9 Purchase tokens at the campstore. Campstore Two Medicine Campstore May 27 ................ Sept. 3 Gifts, self-serve convenience food, groceries, fshing tackle, camping supplies, and frewood Scenic Boat Tours Glacier Park Boat Co. June 1................. Sept. 8 45 minute narrated tours of Two Medicine Lake begin June 1 at 9 am, 10 am, 11 am, 1 pm, 3 pm, and 5 pm. Beginning July 1, an 8 am tour is available. Optional guided walks to Twin Falls included on the 1 pm and 3 pm tours. Rowboat, canoe, kayak, and 8 hp motorboat rentals are available from 8:30 am to 6:30 pm (last rental out at 5:30 pm). From July 1 to September 8 rentals are available starting at 8 am. Call 406-257-2426 for information and rentals. Backcountry Lodging (only accessible by trail ) Belton Chalets, Inc. Granite Park Chalet June 29................ Sept. 9 Granite Park Chalet provides rustic accommodations that include rooms, beds, and a common kitchen. Guests provide their own sleeping bag, water, food, and cooking utensils. Optional bed linen service is available. You may also visit GraniteParkChalet.com for additional information. Backpacking & Hiking Glacier Guides, Inc. May ..........................Oct. Guided day hikes and backpacking trips into Glacier’s backcountry for one to seven days. Custom guide service trips available. Camping equipment available for rent at their West Glacier offce. Call 406-387-5555 or 800-521-RAFT for reservations and information or visit GlacierGuides.com. Bus Tours Sun Tours May 27 .............. Sept. 30 Interpretive tours highlighting Blackfeet culture and history relating to Glacier National Park’s natural features. Tours begin from Browning, East Glacier, St. Mary, Rising Sun, Izaak Walton Inn, Apgar, and West Glacier. Call 800-786-9220 or 406-732-9220 for reservations and information. Red Bus Tours May 18 ................Oct. 20 Call 855-733-4522 for reservations and schedule information about Red Bus tours between park lodges, as well as to Two Medicine, East Glacier, West Glacier, and St. Mary. Cash Machines Automatic Teller Machines (ATMs) are available at Apgar, Lake McDonald Lodge, Many Glacier (hotel and motor inn), St. Mary, East Glacier, Rising Sun, and West Glacier. Worship Services For a listing of times and locations, please consult a ranger in the campground or at a visitor center. Waterton-Glacier Guide 3 A Fed Bear Is a Dead Bear Grizzlies occupy a mere 2% of their former range and wilderness areas like Glacier National Park are essential refuges for their survival. For black and grizzly bears, this is home and we are guests. To be a good guest in bear country, you must never let bears access human food and always stay the proper distance from bears. To protect human life and property, bears that seek human food must be removed from the park. Please keep all food and garbage stored out of reach of bears at all times. Our campgrounds and developed areas can remain unattractive to bears if each visitor manages food and trash properly. Place all trash in designated bear-resistant garbage containers. Following park regulations will help keep the “wild” in wildlife and ensure your safety, as well. Please report all bear sightings immediately. For more information, stop by any visitor center, attend a ranger-led program, or visit online at: go.nps.gov/bearcountry. Protect Yourself, Protect the Bears Hike in Groups Carry Bear Spray Make Noise Hiking in groups signifcantly decreases your chances of having a bear encounter. If you are looking for hiking company, be sure to look at the Ranger-led Activity Schedule to see if there are any rangerled hikes available for you to join. Trail running is highly discouraged. And know how to use it! This aerosol pepper spray temporarily incapacitates bears and is the most effective deterrent. Bear spray should not create a false sense of security or serve as a substitute for practicing standard safety precautions in bear country. Bears will usually move out of the way if they hear people approaching. Most bells are not enough. Call out and clap at regular intervals as a better way to make your presence known. If you cannot see around a corner, then neither can a bear, so make noise to avoid surprising a bear. Secure Food & Garbage Be Bear Aware What if You Encounter a Bear? Never leave food, garbage, or anything used to prepare, consume, store, or transport food unattended. Other items to secure include: toiletries, cosmetics, and pet food. Anything with a strong odor must be stored in a vehicle, hardsided camper, food locker, or hung when not in use, day or night. Environmental factors like wind speed and direction may prevent a bear from being aware of your presence. Look for scat or tracks. Take notice if you are hiking near an abundance of bear foods, near running water, through thick vegetation, etc. If a bear or other animal is moving in your direction on a trail, get out of its way and let it pass. Move away from the bear without running. If moving away appears to agitate the bear, stop and talk quietly to the bear. Continue to move away as the situation allows. Do not drop food or gear to distract the bear. 25 YARDS (23 METERS) Approaching, viewing, or engaging in any activity within 100 yards of bears or wolves, or within 25 yards of any other wildlife is prohibited. Use binoculars or a telephoto lens to improve your view. Keep the animal’s line of travel clear, and move away if wildlife approaches. 4 Waterton-Glacier Guide 100 YARDS (91 METERS) If you see a bear along the road, do not stop near it. If you wish to view the bear, travel at least 100 yards and pull over in a safe location. Roadside bears quickly become habituated to traffc and people, increasing their chances of being hit by vehicles. Top Strategies for Viewing Wildlife Let Wildlife be Wild Please take the time to learn about the wildlife and respect their need for undisturbed space. While some animals appear to tolerate people, approaching too close can disturb them from feeding areas or travel routes. Keep the animal’s line of travel or escape route clear and move away if wildlife approaches you. Because park animals are wild, they remain unpredictable, and may strike out without warning. Animals may be hit by cars if they hang around parking lots and roads, and habituated animals often have to be relocated or killed. to give it more space. Results may vary and the regulation is always 25 yards from most wildlife and 100 yards from bears and wolves. Bring Your Binoculars Binoculars, telephoto lenses, and spotting scopes are the secret strategy to great wildlife watching. Giving your eyes a boost will take your wildlife viewing opportunities from good to great. When photographing wildlife, use a telephoto lens to maintain the required safe distance. Many visitors enjoy not photographing wildlife at all and simply savoring their views with binoculars instead. Give Wildlife a Brake! Try the Rule of Thumb Hold your hand straight out in front of you with your thumb up, like a hitchhiker. If your thumb does not completely cover the wildlife you are observing then you need to move farther away. If an animal is ever in distress or changing their behavior in anyway because of you, then you need Avoid Trafc Jams Have you ever been jammed up in trafc? “Animal jams” occur when many people stop along the road to view wildlife. In their excitement, some folks forget they need to be aware not only of safety concerns related to wildlife, but also trafc hazards. Don’t contribute to the jam! Slow down and pull over safely, and only in designated areas. Remain in your vehicle, safe from wildlife and trafc, and move on in a short time so others can watch. If you are too close to an animal, on a hill, curve, or in heavy trafc, drive by slowly and avoid stopping. Approaching bears and wolves within 100 yards and all other wildlife within 25 yards, by foot or by car, is unsafe for the animals, dangerous to you, and illegal Four Tips to Survive Summer Smoke It is unlikely you came to Glacier to experience the efects of wildfre. Whether you see fre and smoke, closed roads and trails, or recently burned forests, wildfre may be part of your park experience. This is especially true during the dry summer days of mid-July through mid-September. The park works hard to prevent fres from ruining your visit, but emergency situations can develop. Use these four tips to enjoy your Glacier trip despite the smoke. Smoke from the 2018 Howe Ridge Fire. Keep in mind that fre and smoke can be hard to predict and fexibility will be key to making the most out of your visit to the park. First, consider your health and try to limit your exposure to smoke. Choose less strenuous activities, and understand that children and the elderly are particularly sensitive to smoke in the air. Second, time it right. On smoky days, views of scenery will often be better just after sunrise and worse mid-day. Check visibility on our webcams! Third, when the grand vistas are too smoky, visit a historic lodge, hike to a waterfall, or seek other “close-ups” of Glacier’s beauty. Visitor centers can help you fnd an opportunity that works for you. Fourth, check Glacier’s website, www.nps.gov/glac for the latest conditions. Top Nine Hazards to Watch Out for 1. Falling Many accidents occur when people fall after stepping of trails or roadsides, or by venturing onto very steep slopes. Stay on designated trails and do not go beyond protective fencing or guard rails. Supervise children in such areas. At upper elevations, follow trails carefully. Glacier’s summer weather is as varied as its landscape. Even when temperatures reach the 80s and 90s, it can cool down into the 40s at night. Prepare for a variety of weather conditions and pack accordingly. You may start the day in a t-shirt and shorts, and need a sweater or parka by evening. Dress in layers and always bring rain gear. 2. Drowning Use extreme caution near water. Swift, cold glacial streams and rivers, mosscovered rocks, and slippery logs are dangerous. Avoid wading in or fording swift streams. Never walk, play, or climb on slippery rocks and logs, especially around waterfalls. When boating, do not stand up or lean over the side, and always wear a life jacket. 5. Hypothermia Freezing temperatures can occur in Glacier’s high country any month of the year. If you plan to head for higher elevations, avoid making assumptions based on low elevation weather. Layer with synthetic or wool clothing as a base layer, and eat high-energy foods throughout the day. 3. Snow and Ice Snowfelds and glaciers can present serious hazards. Snow bridges may conceal deep crevasses on glaciers or hidden cavities under snowfelds. These bridges may collapse under the weight of an unsuspecting hiker. Use extreme caution when crossing steep snowfelds on trails and in the backcountry. 6. Mountain Lions Never hike alone. Make noise often and keep children close to you at all times. If you encounter a lion, do not run. Talk calmly, avert your gaze, stand tall, and back away. If an attack seems imminent, stand your ground. Lions may be scared away by being struck with rocks or sticks, or by being kicked or hit. 4. Weather 7. Hantavirus The most likely source of infection is from rodent urine and droppings inhaled as aerosols or dust. Initial symptoms are almost identical to the onset of fu. If you have p

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