"Spirit of Freedom statue back" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Adams

National Historical Park - Massachusetts

Adams National Historical Park in Quincy, Massachusetts, preserves the home of Presidents of the United States John Adams and John Quincy Adams, of U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, Charles Francis Adams, and of the writers and historians Henry Adams and Brooks Adams. The national historical park's eleven buildings tell the story of five generations of the Adams family (from 1720 to 1927) including Presidents, First Ladies, U.S. Ministers, historians, writers, and family members who supported and contributed to their success.

maps

Official visitor map of Adams National Historical Park (NHP) in Massachusetts. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Adams - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Adams National Historical Park (NHP) in Massachusetts. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area (NRA) in Massachusetts. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Boston Harbor Islands - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area (NRA) in Massachusetts. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/adam/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adams_National_Historical_Park Adams National Historical Park in Quincy, Massachusetts, preserves the home of Presidents of the United States John Adams and John Quincy Adams, of U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, Charles Francis Adams, and of the writers and historians Henry Adams and Brooks Adams. The national historical park's eleven buildings tell the story of five generations of the Adams family (from 1720 to 1927) including Presidents, First Ladies, U.S. Ministers, historians, writers, and family members who supported and contributed to their success. From the sweet little farm at the foot of Penn’s Hill to the gentleman’s country estate at Peace field, Adams National Historical Park is the story of “heroes, statesman, philosophers … and learned women” whose ideas and actions helped to transform thirteen disparate colonies into one united nation. Traveling on U.S. Interstate 93, take exit 7 - Route 3 South to Braintree and Cape Cod. Take the first exit off Route 3 south - exit 42 - and follow signs toward Quincy Center. Continue straight on Burgin Parkway through six traffic lights. At the seventh traffic light, turn right onto Dimmock Street. Follow Dimmock Street one block and turn right onto Hancock Street. The National Park Service Visitor Center, located at 1250 Hancock Street on your left. Validated parking is in the garage to the rear. Adams National Historical Park Visitor Center The Adams National Historical Park Visitor Center is located in downtown Quincy. The Visitor Center is your stop to purchase Adams National Historical Park gifts, America the Beautiful passes, or to watch the video ”Enduring Legacy.” Free validated parking is available the parking garage, and a trolley runs regularly from the Visitor Center to the historic homes. Please note that purchases of America the Beautiful passes are by credit card only. The gift shop accepts cash and credit. Traveling on U.S. Interstate 93, take exit 7 - Route 3 South to Braintree and Cape Cod. Take the first exit off Route 3 south - exit 19 - and follow signs toward Quincy Center. Continue straight on Burgin Parkway through six traffic lights. At the seventh traffic light, turn right onto Dimmock Street. Follow Dimmock Street one block and turn right onto Hancock Street. The National Park Service Visitor Center, located at 1250 Hancock Street on your left. Validated parking is in the garage to the rear. The John and John Quincy Adams Birthplaces The Birthplaces of Presidents John Adams (right) and John Quincy Adams (left) The Birthplaces of John and John Quincy Adams sit right next to each other on Franklin Street. The Birthplace of John Adams The Birthplace of John Adams The house where President John Adams was born in 1735. The Birthplace of John Quincy Adams The Birthplace of John Quincy Adams The house where President John Quincy Adams was born in 1767. Old House at Peace field A view of Old House at Peace field Old House at Peace field, where four generations of the Adams family lived from 1788 to 1927. The Paneled Room The Paneled Room located inside Old House at Peace field. The Paneled Room greets everyone who enters Old House at Peace field. The Stone Library The Stone Library located outside Old House at Peace field. The Stone Library houses up to 14,000 books belonging to the Adams family. Inside the Stone Library Inside the Stone Library A view into the Stone Library The Gardens Located at Old House at Peace field The gardens located at Old House at Peace field. The gardens located by Old House at Peace field bloom in every color you can imagine. Elementary School Students Converge on Adams National Historical Park for "Farm to School: Picnic in the Park" Adams National Historical Park hosted the third annual Farm to School: Picnic in the Park event. Farm to School is a Quincy Public Schools initiative that encourages healthy living in youth, connects youth to their environment, offers more locally sourced food in schools, and gets kids outdoors. Students and families participated in a wide variety of activities throughout the day, all designed to reflect the agricultural heritage of John and Abigail Adams’s farm. Mother and daughter examine a honeybee Your Fee Dollars at Work: Flags Will Fly High Over the Home of Two US Presidents As visitors arrive to the Adams Estate, home of two US presidents, the first thing they see is a flagpole in obvious need of repair. Your contribution through entrance fees is helping the park to repair the pulley system, halyards, and coating on the 60-foot pole near the Old House and the 30-foot pole by the Birthplace. Flagless flagpole next to a parking lot Restoration of Beale Estate Boundary Wall and Fence at Adams National Historical Park Stone walls and wrought iron fences are a signature feature of colonial New England landscapes and disappearing as development overtakes the historic fabric of many cultural landscapes. The park repaired the Beale wall and fence with money collected from entrance fees. Iron fence along a sidewalk near a road Replacing Greenhouse Windows with Your Help This Greenhouse was built in the 1920s and is used to propagate plant material for the Old House Garden and the cultural landscape. Money collected from entrance fees allowed for the replacement of windows. NPS employee replacing a window pane on a window laying on a worktable National Park Getaway: Adams National Historical Park A place where the past and present coincide, Adams National Historical Park has something everyone in the family can enjoy. The park is home to three historic homes owned by four generations of the country’s first political dynasty. From the birth of second US President John Adams to the death of his great-grandson Brooks, Adams National Historical Park traces the history of the Adams family’s impressive lives. Library of the Adam's family “This Cottage of Our Own”: Archeology at the Adams Birthplaces The Adams National Historical Site contains the birthplaces of John Adams and John Quincy Adams, the second and sixth presidents of the United States. Archeological excavations have helped understand more about these two presidents, their households, and the multiple other individuals who lived in these homes after them. John Adams Birthplace More proud than they have reason to be Future president John Quincy Adams remained unconvinced that America had gained anything by fighting the War of 1812. Writing privately to his father in 1816, he grumbled that many Americans were “rather more proud than they have reason [to be]...” John Quincy Adams sitting for a portrait On Presidential Births and Deaths There are many connections between the Presidents. This article will explore some of those connections. the United States Presidential Seal National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Abigail Adams’ Apple Pan Dowdy There were many Germans in the Mohawk Valley of NY, as well as apple trees. So this is a dish that could’ve very easily found its way to a holiday table of one of the many families living along the Mohawk River in the 18th Century. An pie/crumble style food sits in a dish in front of a christmas tree. Series: Festive Foods of the Fort Special holiday foods made life at Fort Stanwix/Schuyler a little more tolerable during the cold winters of the American Revolution. Learn more about the ones that might've been seen and tasted here. A pie-type crumble in an earthenware dish. Fat Book Week You've heard of #FatBearWeek...now get ready for #FatBookWeek! In honor of the 10,000+ books in the Longfellow family collection, we called on other literary-minded sites to submit the fattest book in their museum collections for a tournament-style bracket of 10 heavyweight tomes. Check out the bracket, then visit @LONGNPS on Instagram each morning from October 6-12 to vote for your favorite bulky book! Graphic of a bear with a paw on a stack of books. Text reads "Fat Book Week October 6-12, 2021"

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