"nps_dena_5mb_image" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Alagnak

Wild River - Alaska

The headwaters of Alagnak Wild River lie within the rugged Aleutian Range of neighboring Katmai National Park and Preserve. Meandering west towards Bristol Bay and the Bering Sea, the Alagnak traverses the beautiful Alaska Peninsula, providing an unparalleled opportunity to experience the unique wilderness, wildlife, and cultural heritage of southwest Alaska

maps

Official visitor map of Alagnak Wild River in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Alagnak - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Alagnak Wild River in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Katmai National Park & Preserve (NP&PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Katmai - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Katmai National Park & Preserve (NP&PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

brochures

A trip planning and information guide to Alagnak Wild River, Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, Katmai National Park and Preserve in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Alagnak, Aniakchak, Katmai - Guide 2021

A trip planning and information guide to Alagnak Wild River, Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, Katmai National Park and Preserve in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/alag/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alagnak_River The headwaters of Alagnak Wild River lie within the rugged Aleutian Range of neighboring Katmai National Park and Preserve. Meandering west towards Bristol Bay and the Bering Sea, the Alagnak traverses the beautiful Alaska Peninsula, providing an unparalleled opportunity to experience the unique wilderness, wildlife, and cultural heritage of southwest Alaska The headwaters of Alagnak Wild River lie within the rugged Aleutian Range of neighboring Katmai National Park and Preserve. Meandering west towards Bristol Bay and the Bering Sea, the Alagnak traverses the beautiful Alaska Peninsula, providing an unparalleled opportunity to experience the unique wilderness, wildlife, and cultural heritage of southwest Alaska. Alagnak Wild River is located in a remote part of the Alaska Peninsula, about 290 miles southwest of Anchorage. Access is by boat or small floatplane. King Salmon Visitor Center Located next door to the King Salmon Airport, the King Salmon Visitor Center provides information on the many federal public lands of Southwest Alaska, particularly those in the Bristol Bay area. A large collection of films is available for viewing and an Alaska Geographic bookstore sells maps, charts, videos, posters, clothing and more. **At this time, the Visitor Center will only be staffed through a walk-up window with limited services. This visitor center is located next to the passenger terminal at the King Salmon Airport salmon in Alagnak River underwater photo of salmon swimming in river Each summer, hundreds of thousands of salmon return to the Alagnak watershed to spawn. Rafts along the river inflatable rafts on the edge of a river Rafting is a popular way to experience the river. Alagnak Wild River aerial view of braided Alagnak River Alagnak River's lower reaches are extremely braided. In Celebration of ANILCA Former President, Jimmy Carter, offers a sentimental introduction to the 25th Anniversary Edition of Alaska Park Science and the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA). Black and white photo of six white men standing in front of an old National Park Service Building. A History of Science in Alaska's National Parks National park units in Alaska precede the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916. The first park unit, Sitka National Monument, was conceived in 1908, and by the mid-1920s four national monuments along with Alaska’s first national park were part of the growing park system. Discover how the early 1900s and observations of a few helped to establish the National Park Service in Alaska. Black and white photo of Arno Cammerer sitting at his desk looking through papers. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Alagnak Wild River, Alaska Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] raft on river Alaska Aviation Safety In Alaska, small planes are often the best way to get around but flying has its risks. Aviation safety requires more than just a pilot’s skill–it takes all of us. Learn more about aviation to increase the safety of your next park flight. An NPS pilot in a plane cockpit flying over a turquoise lake Series: The Legacy of ANILCA The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act impacts the National Park Service in many ways. ANILCA stipulates the designation of wilderness, subsistence management, transportation in and across parklands, use of cabins, mining, archaeological sites, scientific research studies and more. Two men drag a harvest seal from icy blue waters across frozen ice. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Bumble Bees of Alaska: A Field Guide This field guide to bumble bees will help you identify these abundant and conspicuous pollinators, which are found across most of Alaska. They are well-adapted to cold, harsh climates and live in every habitat where there are flowers offering up pollen and nectar, including forests, shrublands, tundra, wetlands, riparian areas, beaches, and gardens. a bumble bee perched on tiny pink flowers
Park Info National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior The Novarupta A trip planning and information guide to Alagnak Wild River Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve Katmai National Park and Preserve ANELA KOPSHERVER Issue Number 2021 What’s Inside: LIAN LAW NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY NPS PHOTO Brooks Camp...............6 Katmai Origins............14 Backcountry Travel....20 Three National Parks, Many Amazing Experiences National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Alagnak Wild River Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve Katmai National Park and Preserve Katmai was declared a National Monument in 1918; Aniakchak in 1978. The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 established Alagnak Wild River, while Katmai and Aniakchak were expanded to include national preserve areas. Katmai was also redesignated a national park. Together, these lands encompass nearly five million acres of unique landscapes managed by the National Park Service. Mailing Address PO Box 7 King Salmon, AK 99613 Park Headquarters Phone: 907-246-3305 Fax: 907-246-2116 Websites Alagnak: www.nps.gov/alag Aniakchak: www.nps.gov/ania Katmai: www.nps.gov/katm Welcome to Katmai Country Welcome to Katmai! Katmai National Park and Preserve (Katmai) lies within the ancestral homelands of the Alutiit-Sugpiat (Aleut) people. Human habitation of this region goes back many thousands of years and speaks of thriving communities and perseverance in the face of challenging environments. Today, the Alutiit-Sugpiat people strive to maintain their traditional lifeways even in light of pressure brought on by an ever-changing world. Their connections to these lands are enduring and worthy of our respect. According, I would like to take a moment to acknowledge our Alaska Native communities—be they Alutiit-Sugpiat, Dena’ina, or Yup’ik—for their enduring legacy as the caretakers of this wonderous land we are fortunate to experience, and today call Katmai. Geographically, Katmai is found on the Alaska Peninsula which encompasses a vast and beautiful landscape where the National Park Service also has the privilege of managing Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, and the Alagnak Wild River. Regardless of your interests, collectively these different park areas offer a diversity of outstanding Alaskan experiences. The geology of Katmai is both ancient and new. The park’s diverse landscapes comprise expansive mountains, active volcanoes, flowing glaciers and a wild and beautiful seacoast that is frequently fed by sparkling rivers and lakes. The cataclysmic eruption of Novarupta in 1912 took place long ago when compared to a human lifespan, but is geologically recent. The resulting ash covered everything for miles and even today life is still recovering from the effects of the eruption. Many dedicated individuals from diverse walks of life have worked tirelessly over the years to ensure that wildlife remains abundant and diverse throughout this region. It is in large part because of these efforts that Katmai today supports world-class fisheries and outstanding wildlife viewing opportunities. To observe an Alaskan brown bear in its natural environment is a testament to the priorities of our nation. Recently, we have all experienced some very trying times due to the far-reaching effects of the global coronavirus pandemic. Last year we were able to operate, albeit at a reduced operational capacity and this year promises to be similar, though we are striving to expand visitor services where possible during the 2021 season. Thank you for your understanding and cooperation with Covid-19 related mitigations; your adherence to them will help us stay open throughout the season. We are glad you have come here to experience for yourself the sights, sounds, and feel of this special place and we hope that you take home many memories that will last a lifetime. Mark Sturm, Superintendent Contents: Southwest Alaska’s Parklands.................................................2-3 Katmai and the National Park Idea......................................14-15 Essential Information...................................................................4 Exploring the Human History of Katmai..................................16 Getting Here, Getting Around....................................................5 Cycle of the Salmon...................................................................17 Welcome to Brooks Camp........................................................6-7 Fishing Information...................................................................18 Camping at Brooks Camp............................................................8 Backcountry Travel................................................................20-21 Brooks Camp Map........................................................................9 Aniakchak National Monument...........................................22-23 Bear Viewing.......................
Alagnak Wild River An An Illustrated Illustrated Guide Guide to to the the Cultural Cultural History History of the the Alagnak Alagnak Wild Wild River River of Purpose and Use of Guide People of the area have used the Alagnak River and its natural resources for many hundreds of years. Evidence of prehistoric settlements, historic fish camps and cabins, as well as an abandoned contact-era village with a Russian Orthodox Church and cemetery, dot the landscape. The combination of natural and cultural resources represents an invaluable part of our shared heritage. The purpose of this guide is to help visitors appreciate and enjoy the Alagnak’s distinctive cultural history. This guide is not intended for navigational use. A circa 1912 John Thwaites photograph of a Yup’ik cache on Nushagak Bay, perhaps near Snag Point (modern-day Dillingham). The cache was made of hand hewn white spruce logs with square notched corners and a sod roof. Photo courtesy of John Thwaites Collection-0132-549, Special Collection Division, University of Washington Libraries. Facing page: Elbert E. Sargent prospecting along the Alagnak in 1947. Photo courtesy of Joanne E. Sargent-Wolverton. i The Alagnak Wild River The Alagnak Wild River meanders through a unique landscape of open tundra, spruce forests, and dramatic canyon walls. Established as a Wild River in 1980, the Alagnak is rich in cultural history, physical beauty, and natural resources. Here, evidence of past and present people intermingles along the banks of rolling tundra and among diverse populations of fish and wildlife. Today, the Alagnak is used by visitors and residents for recreational and subsistence activitiesprimarily fishing and angling, camping, gathering, rafting, paddling, and hunting. Whichever activity you choose, the Alagnak River provides a rare opportunity to connect with history and the surrounding landscape. So fasten your life-vest and get ready to enjoy the Alagnak Wild River! 1 Midriver braided channel. The River The Alagnak is a clear free-flowing river that drains an area of 3,600 square kilometers (2,237 square miles) and empties into the Kvichak River near Bristol Bay in southwestern Alaska. The river and its major tributary, the Nonvianuk River, flow westward from lakes located within Katmai National Park and Preserve. Headwaters of the 127 kilometer (km or 79 miles [mi]) long river and its tributary are Kukaklek and Nonvianuk Lakes, respectively. The Alagnak is managed free of impoundments and diversions. It is inaccessible by road, its shorelines are primitive, and its water unpolluted. In the local language the word alagnak means, “making mistakes.” According to a life-long area resident, “the channel is always changing, causing mistakes and getting lost.” Every year the river changes and branches which is why it is known locally as “the Branch River.” The Yup’ik people pronounced Alagnak as “Ah-lock-anok.” Euroamericans anglicized its pronunciation as Lockanok. The Alagnak River was first documented by the Russian Captain Tebenkov in 1852. 2 River Designation The upper 108 km (67 mi) of the Alagnak, including the two upper branches, were designated a Wild River in 1980 by Title VI, Section 601(25 and 44) of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) and is managed by the National Park Service (NPS) according to the provisions of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. All but the lower 29 km (18 mi) of the river have been designated Wild River status. The NPS manages the River to: Protect and enhance the River as a dynamic ecosystem by maintaining its free flowing nature and preserving water quality, Preserve the outstanding natural values on the River that include its natural channels and flow, naturally occurring fish and wildlife populations, cultural resources, and its peaceful and scenic character for the benefit and enjoyment of future generations, and Preserve the outstanding values on the River of subsistence and recreation that are compatible with the other values for which the River was designated. Marsh marigold Land Ownership Land ownership along the river is a checkerboard of public and private property; therefore, river users should not assume that every “pull-out” is open to public use. There are currently no established campgrounds. It is recommended that river users consult a Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land status map to ensure property rights are observed. 3 Prehistoric Past Ice from the last Ice Age receded from the Alagnak River drainage well before 12,000 years ago. Pottery made of local clay and tempered with hair or down, and later with sand or gravel, is common in sites on the Alaska Peninsula beginning 2,500 years ago. Present day 2,200 b.p. 9,000 b.p. 12,000 b.p. Cultural evidence of people who occupied the river banks and lake outlets since the last ice age, is found on the surface of the glacial drift and outwash deposits at the lake outlets. Some evidence of

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