"Andersonville 1864 - 2013" by NPS/C. Barr , public domain

Andersonville

National Historic Site - Georgia

The Andersonville National Historic Site, located near Andersonville, Georgia, preserves the former Camp Sumter (also known as Andersonville Prison), a Confederate prisoner-of-war camp during the final fourteen months of the American Civil War. Most of the site lies in southwestern Macon County, adjacent to the east side of the town of Andersonville. As well as the former prison, the site contains the Andersonville National Cemetery and the National Prisoner of War Museum. The prison was made in February 1864 and served to April 1865. The site was commanded by Captain Henry Wirz, who was tried and executed after the war for war crimes. It was overcrowded to four times its capacity, with an inadequate water supply, inadequate food rations, and unsanitary conditions. Of the approximately 45,000 Union prisoners held at Camp Sumter during the war, nearly 13,000 died. The chief causes of death were scurvy, diarrhea, and dysentery.

maps

Official visitor map of Andersonville National Historic Site (NHS) in Georgia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Andersonville - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Andersonville National Historic Site (NHS) in Georgia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of the Cemetery of Andersonville National Historic Site (NHS) in Georgia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Andersonville - Cemetery

Official visitor map of the Cemetery of Andersonville National Historic Site (NHS) in Georgia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Statewide Bike Map of Georgia. Published by the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT).Georgia State - Georgia Bike Map

Statewide Bike Map of Georgia. Published by the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT).

https://www.nps.gov/ande/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andersonville_National_Historic_Site The Andersonville National Historic Site, located near Andersonville, Georgia, preserves the former Camp Sumter (also known as Andersonville Prison), a Confederate prisoner-of-war camp during the final fourteen months of the American Civil War. Most of the site lies in southwestern Macon County, adjacent to the east side of the town of Andersonville. As well as the former prison, the site contains the Andersonville National Cemetery and the National Prisoner of War Museum. The prison was made in February 1864 and served to April 1865. The site was commanded by Captain Henry Wirz, who was tried and executed after the war for war crimes. It was overcrowded to four times its capacity, with an inadequate water supply, inadequate food rations, and unsanitary conditions. Of the approximately 45,000 Union prisoners held at Camp Sumter during the war, nearly 13,000 died. The chief causes of death were scurvy, diarrhea, and dysentery. The Camp Sumter military prison at Andersonville was one of the largest Confederate military prisons during the Civil War. During the 14 months the prison existed, more than 45,000 Union soldiers were confined here. Of these, almost 13,000 died here. Today, Andersonville National Historic Site is a memorial to all American prisoners of war throughout the nation's history. Andersonville National Historic Site is located in southwest Georgia. The park is approximately 12 miles north of Americus and 11 miles south of Montezuma on GA-49. National Prisoner of War Museum At the National Prisoner of War Museum, the story of American prisoners of war (POWs) is powerfully presented through exhibits, audio-visual displays, and historic artifacts. The museum serves as the park's visitor center. You can find information, audio tours, and a gift shop with items about Andersonville, the Civil War, and POWs of other American wars. The museum has a theater where you can view two 30-minute films, including one about Andersonville and one about all American POWs. Andersonville National Historic Site is located in southwest Georgia. The park is approximately 12 miles north of Americus and 11 miles south of Montezuma on GA-49. No public transportation systems serve the park. Follow the main entrance road straight up to the museum. Historic Site of Camp Sumter Civil War Military Prison at Andersonville A cannon sits out in front of a replica of part of the wooden stockade walls once at Andersonville Camp Sumter Military Prison, known as Andersonville, was the deadliest ground of the Civil War. Nearly 13,000 American soldiers died here. Summer of 1865 at Andersonville Photo by A.J. Riddle A historic photo of thousands of emaciated Union soldiers held prisoner in 1865 Over 32,000 Union soldiers languished at Andersonville in August 1865 when this photo was taken by A.J. Riddle. Andersonville National Cemetery Fog rests on a stone monument of a Civil War soldier standing among hundreds of graves. The site where the nearly 13,000 Union soldiers who died at Andersonville, designated as a National Cemetery in 1865, is still an active cemetery. Nearly 21,000 American military veterans rest here in honor. The Illinois Monument at Andersonville National Historic Site A large stone monument with 2 Civil War soldiers, a female figure, and 2 children. Many states honored their fallen sons with monuments placed at Andersonville National Historic Site. National Prisoner of War Museum A military garrison cap with a small U.S. flag and silver bar in an exhibit case Andersonville is the only National Park Service site with the mission of preserving the stories of all American Prisoners of War throughout history. White-tailed deer fawn resting at veteran's grave with US flag A spotted white-tailed deer fawn is curled up at the base of a headstone near a small US flag Andersonville NHS preserves history and provides habitat for white-tailed deer and other wildlife. Memorial Day Soldiers talk to a Boy Scout in a cemetery with small US flags decorating the headstones Military staff, Boy Scouts, families and others come to honor those buried in Andersonville National Cemetery on Memorial Day weekend. Teaching with Historic Places in the Parks: On Site/Off Site, Students Learn about Andersonville I realized that the educational materials that I and fellow workshop participants were developing had the potential to touch many people. I hoped that they would encourage students to learn more about this country’s historic treasures, events, and people. For many students in many grade levels, the study of history means sitting in class, listening to a lecture, and memorizing dates. These ways of studying history do have their place, but history is so much more than that. andersonville cemetery NPS photo Women Amidst War The extreme demands of wartime industry and the loss of traditional family breadwinners to military service caused hardship, but also presented opportunities to women for employment, volunteerism, and activism that previously had been unavailable to them. While many of these gains would be temporary, the Civil War nonetheless represents an important step forward in American society's view of the role of women. Women were increasingly seen (and saw themselves) as the foundat Photo of women at a house on the Cedar Mountain battlefield Arizona Students Learn from a Georgia Civil War Prison When teaching my seventh-grade students about the Civil War, nothing leaves more of an impression than the story of Andersonville Prison, a Confederate prison in Andersonville, Georgia, which is now preserved as a national historic site. The Teaching with Historic Places (TwHP) lesson plan, “Andersonville: Prison of War Camp,” is an excellent tool for bringing this story to life in my classroom. 1882 drawing of Andersonville Prison National Parks and National Cemeteries Currently, the National Park Service manages 14 national cemeteries. These cemeteries represent a continuum of use dating to a period before the establishment of the historical parks of which they are an integral part and are administered to preserve the historic character, uniqueness, and solemn nature of both the cemeteries and the historical parks of which they are a part. Setting sun lights up graves and decorations Death and Dying The somber aftermath of Civil War battles introduced Americans--North and South--to death on an unprecedented scale and of an unnatural kind, often ending in an unmarked grave far from home. Neither individuals, nor institutions, nor governments were prepared to deal with death on such a massive scale, for never before or since have we killed so many of our own. The Civil War revolutionized the American military's approach to caring for the dead, leading to our modern cult Photo of freshly buried marked and unmarked graves near Petersburg, Va. Camp Sumter/Andersonville Prison As the war dragged on, both sides faced the challenge of how to adequately feed, clothe and house enemy prisoners. Although conditions were bad in both Southern and Northern prison camps, the Confederacy's Andersonville prison became the most notorious of all Civil War prison camps. Drawing showing bird's eye view of Andersonville prison camp Geophysical Survey Project - Andersonville National Historic Site Third Hospital area, located south of the prison enclosure, surveyed by SEAC in early 2018 GPR data from the Third Hospital area, located south of the prison enclosure 2012 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients In 2012, seven rangers were awarded the national and region Freeman Tilden Awards for innovative and exciting interpretive programs. Learn their stories and more about their award-winning programs. Renee Albertoli The Military Experience The course of the war was the cumulative result of political, economic, and social policies that affected (and were affected by) military operations and battles waged across a front spanning 2,000 miles. The battles and campaigns of 1861-65 ultimately demonstrated that the simple application of massive military force, even with innovations in technologies and tactics, was insufficient to resolve a conflict between two sections mobilized against one another politically, socia Engraving of soldier warming himself by a fire Photo of U.S. Sanitary Commission office. Preserving Places of Captivity: Civil War Military Prisons in the National Parks During the Civil War, over 400,000 Union and Confederate soldiers were held prisoner at more than 150 diff erent prison sites. Approximately 56,000 of these died in captivity. Although Andersonville is the most famous Civil War prison, it is only one of many Civil War military prisons that are preserved by the National Park Service. War to the Hilt The Civil War ushered in a new era of warfare in which the effects of war were felt beyond the battlefield, including confiscation of civilians' personal property, holding prisoners for strategic purposes, and scorched earth military policy. Photo of Union troops at Arlington House Andersonville Civil War Prison Geophysical Survey Project Andersonville Civil War Prison Geophysical Survey Project Ground penetrating radar data from the south and north slopes of the Andersonville prison. Clara Barton and Andersonville Barton's greatest contribution to the Andersonville story is through her work in the Missing Soldiers Office and her support of Dorence Atwater. Atwater was court-martialed and jailed in the fall of 1865 related to a dispute over the ownership of the Andersonville Death Register. It was through Barton's efforts that he was finally released and she then supported his publication of the Death Register. A Private Chapter of the War, Part I First Lieutenant George W. Bailey wrote a book about his time in the Civil War where he was taken prisoner and sent to Andersonville Prison Camp in Georgia. The book acts as a diary where enters thoughts and activities on a day to day basis. He sent a copy of that book to President James A. Garfield in 1881. Today it is in the Memorial Library. Part 2 is also available. a brown book titled A Private Chapter in the War A Private Chapter of the War, Part II Bailey escaped Andersonville to a plantation in Georgia that is owned by a Confederate soldier. This article will share the conclusion of his journey back north during the same time as Ohioan William T Sherman is making his famous March to the Sea. a brown book titled A Private Chapter in the War The Changing War Begun as a purely military effort with the limited political objectives of reunification (North) or independence (South), the Civil War transformed into a social, economic and political revolution with unforeseen consequences. As the war progressed, the Union war effort steadily transformed from a limited to a hard war; it targeted not just Southern armies, but the heart of the Confederacy's economy, morale, and social order-the institution of slavery. Woodcut of spectators watching a train station set fire by Sherman's troops National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Isaac S. Hawkins: Prisoner of War Isaac S. Hawkins enlisted in the 54th Massachusetts Regiment in time to join it during a campaign invading Florida. During the Battle of Olustee, Confederate soldiers captured Hawkins and imprisoned him in the infamous Andersonville prisoner of war camp. Color lithograph of union civil war soldiers engaged in a battle. Andersonville National Cemetery Cultural Landscape Andersonville National Cemetery was established on July 26, 1865, for the burial of Union soldiers who perished at Fort Sumter (then Andersonville Prison). It continues to be a permanent resting place of honor for deceased veterans. The landscape includes a low brick wall that surrounds the site, rows of marble headstones, large canopy trees, and several historic buildings. Rows of white headstones cross the landscape. Series: Creative Teaching with Historic Places: Selections from CRM Vol 23 no 8 (2000) These articles are a selection from a special issue of CRM Journal, "Creative Teaching with Historic Places" published in 2000. They provide examples of teaching using historic places both in and out of the classroom, helping students connect with history using the power of place, as well as how to prepare lessons making those connections. Teaching with Historic Places is a program of the National Park Service. Cover of CRM Journal "Creative Teaching with Historic Places" Series: African American History at Gettysburg Abraham Brian, Basil Biggs, James Warfield, and Mag Palm are just a few of the many individuals that were affected by the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, and each has their own story to tell. We have collected their stories in one place so that you can learn more about their various trials during this tumultuous time in American history. A black and white photograph of a black family posing with a white man and his horse in a dirt road.

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