"Surprise Lake from Rim of crater" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Aniakchak

National Monument & Preserve - Alaska

Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve is a U.S. National Monument and National Preserve, consisting of the region around the Aniakchak volcano on the Aleutian Range of south-western Alaska.

maps

Official visitor map of Aniakchak National Monument & Preserve (NM & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Aniakchak - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Aniakchak National Monument & Preserve (NM & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

brochures

A trip planning and information guide to Alagnak Wild River, Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, Katmai National Park and Preserve in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Alagnak, Aniakchak, Katmai - Guide 2021

A trip planning and information guide to Alagnak Wild River, Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, Katmai National Park and Preserve in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/ania/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assateague_Island_National_Seashore Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve is a U.S. National Monument and National Preserve, consisting of the region around the Aniakchak volcano on the Aleutian Range of south-western Alaska. Given its remote location and challenging weather conditions, Aniakchak is one of the most wild and least visited places in the National Park System. This landscape is a vibrant reminder of Alaska's location in the volcanically active "Ring of Fire," as it is home to an impressive six mile (10 km) wide, 2,500 ft (762 m) deep caldera formed during a massive volcanic eruption 3,500 years ago. Located on the Alaska Peninsula, 450 miles southwest of Anchorage, Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve is inaccessible by road. Notoriously bad weather makes access to Aniakchak unpredictable. Drop-offs and/or pick-ups may be significantly delayed. King Salmon Visitor Center Located next door to the King Salmon Airport, the King Salmon Visitor Center provides information on the many federal public lands of Southwest Alaska, particularly those in the Bristol Bay area. A large collection of films is available for viewing and an Alaska Geographic bookstore sells maps, charts, videos, posters, clothing and more. **At this time, the Visitor Center will only be staffed through a walk-up window with limited services. This visitor center is located next to the passenger terminal at the King Salmon Airport. Floating the Gates of Aniakchak A lone raft floats the Aniakchak Wild River as it flows through the "Gates" A lone raft floats the Aniakchak Wild River as it flows through the "Gates" Aniakchak Caldera Aerial shot of Aniakchak Caldera Aerial shot of Aniakchak Caldera Black Nose, Aniakchak Caldera Black Nose, Aniakchak Caldera Black Nose, Aniakchak Caldera Maar Lake, Aniakchak Caldera Maar Lake, Aniakchak Caldera Maar Lake, Aniakchak Caldera The Gates of Aniakchak The Gates of Aniakchak The Gates of Aniakchak Subsistence The study of subsistence resources in parks has been a mix of long-term work and projects instigated by issues facing the Federal Subsistence Board. Winter hunting is an important subsistence activity in many Alaska communities and park areas. Science in Wilderness Marine Reserves ANILCA establishes the largest scientific laboratory...ever! A spawning salmon struggles to get back into the water. Balancing the Benefits and Impacts of Science in Alaska’s Wilderness Achieving consistency in permitting decisions across multiple units of the National Park System remains a constant challenge. When opportunities allow, park managers combine environmental compliance for related projects spanning several units, such as the installation of climate monitoring stations for the Inventory & Monitoring networks. A woman with long, dark hair, lilac shirt and jeans stands next to a climate monitoring station. In Celebration of ANILCA Former President, Jimmy Carter, offers a sentimental introduction to the 25th Anniversary Edition of Alaska Park Science and the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA). Black and white photo of six white men standing in front of an old National Park Service Building. A History of Science in Alaska's National Parks National park units in Alaska precede the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916. The first park unit, Sitka National Monument, was conceived in 1908, and by the mid-1920s four national monuments along with Alaska’s first national park were part of the growing park system. Discover how the early 1900s and observations of a few helped to establish the National Park Service in Alaska. Black and white photo of Arno Cammerer sitting at his desk looking through papers. Old is Getting Older In the last 25 years, persistent archaeological survey and improved scientific techniques have resulted in new data which confirms that Alaska sites are actually much earlier than we once believed. NPS archaeologist works at Amakomanak site in Noatak National Preserve. Land Ownership in National Park System Units in Alaska and Possibilities for Mining and Other Developments There are over 54 million acres of National Park System units in Alaska, which is 65 percent of the entire National Park System. Although most of those lands are in federal ownership and are managed by the NPS, there are over two million acres of non-federally owned lands within those units. These non-federal lands are in private, state, borough, or municipal ownership. The existence of these lands creates the possibility of mining and other developments within the boundaries rustic buildings near a creek, hills and mountains in the distance NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Aniakchak National Monument & Preserve, Alaska Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] snow covered volcanic caldera Volcanic Hazards in Alaska’s National Parks There are over 100 volcanoes in Alaska, 54 of which are considered historically active, and 14 are found in Alaska national parks, preserves, and monuments. The Alaska Volcano Observatory monitors and conducts research on volcanoes in Alaska in order to better understand volcanic processes and determine the likelihood of future volcanic hazards, with a primary goal of informing the public about volcanic hazards and impending volcanic activity. Alaska Park Science 18(1), 2019. A snow covered volcanic peak. Duck-billed Dinosaurs (Hadrosauridae), Ancient Environments, and Cretaceous Beringia in Alaska’s National Parks This article presents new information from Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve on the Alaska Peninsula, that sheds light on the likely ancient environment that allowed the migration of one group of dinosaurs, the hadrosaurs (duck-billed dinosaurs), across Beringia during the Cretaceous. Alaska Park Science 17(1), 2018. An artists drawing of Hadrosaurs in Aniakchak. Small Mammals as Indicators of Climate, Biodiversity, and Ecosystem Change This is a time of rapid environmental changes in Alaska. Species that have evolved within tundra habitats over multiple glacial cycles are not only best adapted to high-latitude and high-elevation environments, but may also respond more slowly to change. Studies of small mammal communities could provide valuable insights to larger ecosystem changes. two marmots perched atop a large boulder POET newsletter March 2013 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from March 2013. dock on beach Conserving pinnipeds in Pacific Ocean parks in response to climate change The evolutionary record from previous climate perturbations indicates that marine mammals are highly vulnerable but also remarkably adaptable to climatic change in coastal ecosystems. Consequently, national parks in the Pacific, from Alaska to Hawaii, are faced with potentially dramatic changes in their marine mammal fauna, especially pinnipeds (seals and sea lions). black harbor seal Alaska Aviation Safety In Alaska, small planes are often the best way to get around but flying has its risks. Aviation safety requires more than just a pilot’s skill–it takes all of us. Learn more about aviation to increase the safety of your next park flight. An NPS pilot in a plane cockpit flying over a turquoise lake Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 16 Issue: Science in Alaska's Arctic Parks The National Park Service manages five parks that fall partially or entirely within the Arctic tundra biome. These five parks encompass 19.3 million acres of land and constitute approximately 25% of the land area managed by the National Park Service nationwide. These are undeveloped places, with free-flowing rivers and wilderness at a massive scale. a group of muskox running across a field Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 13 Issue 2: Mineral and Energy Development There’s no denying that energy and mineral extraction have been and will continue to be important across the North for a long time. Mining and energy-related industries provide direct and indirect employment for thousands of people, taxes and other revenues. Our need is for science, engineering, and scholarly research; to develop safe, effective, and affordable technologies; to protect, preserve, and restore the natural and human environment; and to record and communicate our history. aerial view of buildings and a pier sticking out into the ocean Series: The Legacy of ANILCA The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act impacts the National Park Service in many ways. ANILCA stipulates the designation of wilderness, subsistence management, transportation in and across parklands, use of cabins, mining, archaeological sites, scientific research studies and more. Two men drag a harvest seal from icy blue waters across frozen ice. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Copper River Basin Symposium - Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve February 2020: With a theme of Tradition, Science, and Stewardship, the two-day symposium included keynote speakers, 26 short presentations, and a poster session. A panel discussion delved into opportunities in working with indigenous communities. Ahtna elders provided wisdom in daily welcomes, and there was a presentation by Copper River Stewardship Youth. Topics ranged widely from fisheries to archaeology to geology. As well as sharing knowledge, participants shared meals, stories, and ideas. Copper River Basin Symposium logo by Lindsay and Elvie Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Alaska Park Science, Volume 18, Issue 1, Understanding and Preparing for Alaska's Geohazards Alaska is the most geologically active part of North America. Much of the awe-inspiring landscapes of Alaska's parks are created by geologic processes. But sometimes, these processes can be hazardous. This issue explores the state of the science to understand geohazards in Alaska national parks. Alaska Park Science 18(1): 2019. A man jumps down a dune of volcanic ash. Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 17, Issue 1. Migration: On the Move in Alaska Alaska is home to many amazing animal migrations. In this issue, you will read about caribou, salmon, Golden Eagles, Swainson's Thrushes, beluga whales, and more. Human migrations have also occurred here, from ancient Beringia to the Klondike Gold Rush. You can even read about now-extinct species from the Cretaceous and Pleistocene eras. Enjoy this issue of Alaska Park Science and read about migration. Alaska Park Science 17(1), 2018. Caribou swim across a river. Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Bumble Bees of Alaska: A Field Guide This field guide to bumble bees will help you identify these abundant and conspicuous pollinators, which are found across most of Alaska. They are well-adapted to cold, harsh climates and live in every habitat where there are flowers offering up pollen and nectar, including forests, shrublands, tundra, wetlands, riparian areas, beaches, and gardens. a bumble bee perched on tiny pink flowers Series: Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) Newsletters From 2009 to 2015, the Pacific Ocean Education Team published a series of short newsletters about the health of the ocean at various National Park Service sites in and around the Pacific Ocean. Topics covered included the 2010 tsunami, marine debris, sea star wasting disease, ocean acidification, and more. Ocean waves wash in from the right onto a forested and rocky shoreline.
Park Info National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior The Novarupta A trip planning and information guide to Alagnak Wild River Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve Katmai National Park and Preserve ANELA KOPSHERVER Issue Number 2021 What’s Inside: LIAN LAW NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY NPS PHOTO Brooks Camp...............6 Katmai Origins............14 Backcountry Travel....20 Three National Parks, Many Amazing Experiences National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Alagnak Wild River Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve Katmai National Park and Preserve Katmai was declared a National Monument in 1918; Aniakchak in 1978. The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 established Alagnak Wild River, while Katmai and Aniakchak were expanded to include national preserve areas. Katmai was also redesignated a national park. Together, these lands encompass nearly five million acres of unique landscapes managed by the National Park Service. Mailing Address PO Box 7 King Salmon, AK 99613 Park Headquarters Phone: 907-246-3305 Fax: 907-246-2116 Websites Alagnak: www.nps.gov/alag Aniakchak: www.nps.gov/ania Katmai: www.nps.gov/katm Welcome to Katmai Country Welcome to Katmai! Katmai National Park and Preserve (Katmai) lies within the ancestral homelands of the Alutiit-Sugpiat (Aleut) people. Human habitation of this region goes back many thousands of years and speaks of thriving communities and perseverance in the face of challenging environments. Today, the Alutiit-Sugpiat people strive to maintain their traditional lifeways even in light of pressure brought on by an ever-changing world. Their connections to these lands are enduring and worthy of our respect. According, I would like to take a moment to acknowledge our Alaska Native communities—be they Alutiit-Sugpiat, Dena’ina, or Yup’ik—for their enduring legacy as the caretakers of this wonderous land we are fortunate to experience, and today call Katmai. Geographically, Katmai is found on the Alaska Peninsula which encompasses a vast and beautiful landscape where the National Park Service also has the privilege of managing Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, and the Alagnak Wild River. Regardless of your interests, collectively these different park areas offer a diversity of outstanding Alaskan experiences. The geology of Katmai is both ancient and new. The park’s diverse landscapes comprise expansive mountains, active volcanoes, flowing glaciers and a wild and beautiful seacoast that is frequently fed by sparkling rivers and lakes. The cataclysmic eruption of Novarupta in 1912 took place long ago when compared to a human lifespan, but is geologically recent. The resulting ash covered everything for miles and even today life is still recovering from the effects of the eruption. Many dedicated individuals from diverse walks of life have worked tirelessly over the years to ensure that wildlife remains abundant and diverse throughout this region. It is in large part because of these efforts that Katmai today supports world-class fisheries and outstanding wildlife viewing opportunities. To observe an Alaskan brown bear in its natural environment is a testament to the priorities of our nation. Recently, we have all experienced some very trying times due to the far-reaching effects of the global coronavirus pandemic. Last year we were able to operate, albeit at a reduced operational capacity and this year promises to be similar, though we are striving to expand visitor services where possible during the 2021 season. Thank you for your understanding and cooperation with Covid-19 related mitigations; your adherence to them will help us stay open throughout the season. We are glad you have come here to experience for yourself the sights, sounds, and feel of this special place and we hope that you take home many memories that will last a lifetime. Mark Sturm, Superintendent Contents: Southwest Alaska’s Parklands.................................................2-3 Katmai and the National Park Idea......................................14-15 Essential Information...................................................................4 Exploring the Human History of Katmai..................................16 Getting Here, Getting Around....................................................5 Cycle of the Salmon...................................................................17 Welcome to Brooks Camp........................................................6-7 Fishing Information...................................................................18 Camping at Brooks Camp............................................................8 Backcountry Travel................................................................20-21 Brooks Camp Map........................................................................9 Aniakchak National Monument...........................................22-23 Bear Viewing.......................
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