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Andrew Johnson

National Historic Site - Tennessee

Andrew Johnson National Historic Site is located in Greeneville, Tennessee. It was established to honor Andrew Johnson, the 17th President of the United States, who became president after Lincoln was assassinated. The site includes two of Johnson's homes, his tailor shop, and his grave site within the Andrew Johnson National Cemetery.

maps

Official visitor map of Andrew Johnson National Historic Site (NHS) in Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Andrew Johnson - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Andrew Johnson National Historic Site (NHS) in Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/anjo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Johnson_National_Historic_Site Andrew Johnson National Historic Site is located in Greeneville, Tennessee. It was established to honor Andrew Johnson, the 17th President of the United States, who became president after Lincoln was assassinated. The site includes two of Johnson's homes, his tailor shop, and his grave site within the Andrew Johnson National Cemetery. Andrew Johnson's complex presidency (1865-69) illustrates the Constitution at work following the Civil War. As the President and Congress disagreed on Reconstruction methods, the Constitution served as their guide on balance of powers, vetoes, and impeachment. In the end, it evolved as a living document with pivotal amendments on freedom, citizenship, and voting rights - topics still vital today. GPS The GPS setting for Andrew Johnson NHS may be listed as 121 Monument Ave, which is the park HQ in the National Cemetery. To arrive at the Visitor Center, use 101 North College Street, Greeneville, TN. Plane The closest airport is the Tri-Cities Regional Airport, 43 miles NE of Greeneville. From the airport, take I-81 South to exit 36 and follow the signs to Greeneville. Car From I-81S take exit 36 to Rt. 172 south to Greeneville. From I-81N take exit 23 to Rt. 11E north to Greeneville. Andrew Johnson NHS Visitor Center Begin your visit to the Andrew Johnson National Historic Site at the Visitor Center. Here you will receive orientation to the other parts of the park, in addition to general information, brochures, and directions. The Visitor Center houses the site's 13 1/2 minute film "Defender of the Constitution," the Presidential museum, Andrew Johnson's original Tailor Shop, and the Eastern National bookstore. GPS The GPS setting for Andrew Johnson NHS may be listed as 121 Monument Avenue, which is the park HQ building in the National Cemetery. Use 101 North College Street, Greeneville, TN for the visitor Center. Plane The closest airport is the Tri-Cities Regional Airport, 43 miles NE of Greeneville. From the airport, take I-81 South to exit 36 and follow the signs to Greeneville. Car From I-81S take exit 36 to Rt. 172 south to Greeneville. From I-81N take exit 23 to Rt. 11E north to Greeneville. Andrew Johnson Homestead Andrew Johnson Homestead with irises and flag Home of the 17th President from 1851-1875 Early Home Andrew Johnson's Early Home The Johnson family home from the 1830s - 1851 Andrew Johnson Monument Andrew Johnson Monument Gravestone of President and Mrs. Andrew Johnson The Lodge - Park Headquarters A view of the lodge with flag and sky behind The old caretaker's Lodge in the National Cemetery now serves as Park Headquarters Andrew Johnson Museum A view of the museum with center case and wall exhibits The Museum tells the story of a controversial presidency Why Was Andrew Johnson Impeached? Whether post-war Reconstruction of the Union would be lenient towards the former Confederacy, as favored by President Johnson, or harsh, as promoted by the Republican-controlled Congress, boiled over into a clash of wills that resulted in the first impeachment of an American president. Photo of President Andrew Johnson National Parks and National Cemeteries Currently, the National Park Service manages 14 national cemeteries. These cemeteries represent a continuum of use dating to a period before the establishment of the historical parks of which they are an integral part and are administered to preserve the historic character, uniqueness, and solemn nature of both the cemeteries and the historical parks of which they are a part. Setting sun lights up graves and decorations Death and Dying The somber aftermath of Civil War battles introduced Americans--North and South--to death on an unprecedented scale and of an unnatural kind, often ending in an unmarked grave far from home. Neither individuals, nor institutions, nor governments were prepared to deal with death on such a massive scale, for never before or since have we killed so many of our own. The Civil War revolutionized the American military's approach to caring for the dead, leading to our modern cult Photo of freshly buried marked and unmarked graves near Petersburg, Va. Reconstruction During Reconstruction, the Federal government pursued a program of political, social, and economic restructuring across the South-including an attempt to accord legal equality and political power to former slaves. Reconstruction became a struggle over the meaning of freedom, with former slaves, former slaveholders and Northerners adopting divergent definitions. Faced with increasing opposition by white Southerners and some Northerners, however, the government abandoned effor Picture depictsing former slaves and free blacks voting following the passage of the 15th amendment The Border States The existence of divided populations in Border States had a profound impact on Union and Confederate strategy-both political and military. Each side undertook military and political measures--including brutal guerilla warfare-- in their attempts to control areas of divided loyalty and hostile moral and political views held by local civilians. Painting showing removal of Missouri civilians from their homes by Union troops The War and Westward Expansion With Federal resources focused on waging the war farther east, both native tribes and the Confederacy attempted to claim or reclaim lands west of the Mississippi. The Federal government responded with measures (Homestead Act, transcontinental railroad) and military campaigns designed to encourage settlement, solidify Union control of the trans-Mississippi West, and further marginalize the physical and cultural presence of tribes native to the West. Painting Westward the Course of Empire Takes its Way showing settlers moving into the American west The Civil War in American Memory America's cultural memories of the Civil War are inseparably intertwined with that most "peculiar institution" of American history - racial slavery. But in the struggle over Civil War memory which began as soon as the war was over and continues to this day, rival cultural memories of reconciliation and white supremacy have often prevailed. Therein lies the challenge as the National Park Service - a public agency - seeks to "provide understanding" of the Civil War era's lasting impact upon the development of our nation. Elderly Union and Confederate veterans shake hands at the fiftieth anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg Mary Clemmer Ames and “Ten Years in Washington” Mary Clemmer Ames' book Ten Years in Washington, was first published in 1874. The book is an engaging account of the notable buildings and agencies centered in the nation’s capital, and the people whose activities breathed life into them. Read excerpts from her book which include First Lady Julia Grant, First Lady Lucretia Garfield among others. Mary Clemmer Ames portrait Andrew Johnson National Cemetery Cultural Landscape The Andrew Johnson National Cemetery was administered by the War Department until 1942, when it was designated a National Monument and transferred to the NPS. The cultural landscape includes historic features from the two periods of significance associated first with the use of the land by the Johnson family as a burial ground and the establishment and later the development of the National Cemetery by the War Department. North gate of Andrew Johnson National Cemetery (Andrew Johnson National Cemetery: CLI, NPS, 2009) Andrew Johnson's Inauguration Andrew Johnson Inauguration Group of men in a room inaugurating Andrew Johnson Series: African American History at Gettysburg Abraham Brian, Basil Biggs, James Warfield, and Mag Palm are just a few of the many individuals that were affected by the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, and each has their own story to tell. We have collected their stories in one place so that you can learn more about their various trials during this tumultuous time in American history. A black and white photograph of a black family posing with a white man and his horse in a dirt road.

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