"Landscape, Appalachian National Scenic Trail, 2013." by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Appalachian

National Scenic Trail - CT,GA,MA,MD,ME,NC,NH,NJ,NY,PA,TN,VA,VT,WV

The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail, is a marked hiking trail in the Eastern United States extending between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine. The trail is about 2,200 miles (3,500 km) long and according to the Appalachian Trail Conservancy it is the longest hiking-only trail in the world. Most of the trail is in forest or wild lands, although some portions traverse towns, roads and farms. It passes through 14 states: Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine.

maps

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Appalachian - Trail Map

Tail Map of Appalachian National Scenic Trail (NST) in Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_Trail The Appalachian National Scenic Trail, generally known as the Appalachian Trail, is a marked hiking trail in the Eastern United States extending between Springer Mountain in Georgia and Mount Katahdin in Maine. The trail is about 2,200 miles (3,500 km) long and according to the Appalachian Trail Conservancy it is the longest hiking-only trail in the world. Most of the trail is in forest or wild lands, although some portions traverse towns, roads and farms. It passes through 14 states: Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. The Appalachian Trail is a 2,180+ mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains. Conceived in 1921, built by private citizens, and completed in 1937, today the trail is managed by the National Park Service, US Forest Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, numerous state agencies and thousands of volunteers. There are many points of access along the Appalachian Trail, whether it is by car, train, bus or plane. For more detailed directions, please refer to the "Directions" section of our park webpage. Appalachian Trail Conservancy The Appalachian National Scenic Trail does not currently have a visitor center. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy, a national not-for-profit corporation has a visitor center in Harpers Ferry, WV. 0 0 0 McAfee Knob Silhouette of a man with backpack standing on McAfee Knob at sunset with mountains in the distance. McAfee Knob is one of the most popular locations along the A.T. to take photographs. Appalachian Trail The Appalachian Trail runs across a mountain ridge line with views to the horizon of mountain range. Crossing into thirteen states, hikers experience a variety of scenery along the way. The Infamous White Blaze of the A.T. A white blaze marks a tree in the foreground, with a man and child walking away on the wooded trail. The white blaze marks the Appalachian Trail as a way for hikers to identify the route. Volunteer on the A.T. A volunteer is carrying a split log while walking across a wooden footbridge in the woods. The Appalachian Trail is maintained largely by volunteers. Winter on the A.T. A snowy winter view from the A.T. overlooking snowy mountains and clouds in the distance. Hikers can experience many seasons along the A.T. all year round. It is important to be prepared. 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards NETN Species Spotlight - Your Flowers, Shrubs, and Plants Native species - birds, insects, plants, etc - need our help. When planning your yard layout, consider adding some valuable native plants to the mix. Red maple flowers NETN Species Spotlight - Wild Turkey Wild Turkeys are one of the most iconic species in America. They have a long, and as it turns out, mythic history. Wild Tom Turkey. Wayne Dumbleton. NETN Species Spotlight - Hermit Thrush The Hermit Thrush's ethereal song is a mainstay of summers in the Northeastern U.S. But climate change could mean its song will only be heard north of the border if warming continues unabated. A Hermit Thrush perches on the forest floor. Citizen Science in the Digital Age With well over 100 citizen-science based apps now available for smartphones, there is no lack of opportunity for people of all ages and affectations to significantly add to the collective knowledge base about many aspects of the natural world. The phrase “there is an app for that” has perhaps never been more true for natural resource monitoring. Students use microscopes to identify pond species at the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller NHP Bioblitz. NETN Species Spotlight - Ruby-throated Hummingbird The ruby-throated hummingbird is the only bird of that species that makes its home east of the Mississippi. Learn more about this remarkable bird. A hummingbird feeds on a flower NETN Species Spotlight: Monarch Butterfly The monarch butterfly is a majestic insect. Mimicry, migration, and metamorphosis all help to make it the true king of butterflies. But it's numbers have been dropping dramatically in recent years. Learn more about this amazing species and how you can help to save it. Monarch butterfly on a Meadow Blazing Star plant NETN Species Spotlight: Japanese Knotweed Japanese knotweed is a very robust invasive plant species. Learn why it spreads so readily outside of its native Japan, and how the NPS and other groups are trying to control it. Japanese knotweed plant NETN Species Spotlight: Acorn Barnacle Barnacles may at first glance appear to have the most boring of lives. But dig a little deeper into these crafty crustaceans, and you'll learn they are among the most fascinating of seashore creatures. Barnacle feeding close-up NETN Species Spotlight - Northern Short-tailed Shrew The northern short-tailed shrew seems like an impossible mash-up of different creatures. From venomous saliva to echolocation, this tiny predator employs many tactics to satiate an endless appetite. Short-tailed Shrew Trail drainage features: Development and testing of an assessment tool Researchers offer a reliable, empirically tested, field process for assessing trail drainage features and evaluating their effectiveness in making trails sustainable. A researcher measures the width of a trail drainage feature; Kaitlin Burroughs, 2015 The Positive Side of Zero For something that essentially represents "nothingness", the number zero carries a lot of weight when collecting data. a stone zero What’s the Buzz? How Bees Interrelate with Birds, Wildflowers, and Deer Ecosystems are complex and intricate and sometimes have a surprising web of relationships. Learn how deer, bees, birds, and wildflowers connect in the park ecosystems of the northeast. A bee pollinates a wildflower Wild, Wacky, and Weird Weather. What the? A look at the difference between weather and climate. A Vermont blizzard. NETN Species Spotlight - Fisher The fisher is a very capable predator of northeastern forests. Learn about the ways this large member of the weasel family makes its living. A large male fisher sitting Species Spotlight - Crazy Snakeworm Because of the scouring action of the ice age, earthworms are not native to the northeast. One species in particular, the crazy snake worm, has the potential to greatly alter the natural forest ecosystems in our region. An earthworm held in a person's hand NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Appalachian National Scenic Trail, CT, GA, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, TN, VA, VT, and WV Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] trail marker NETN Species Spotlight - Eastern Coyote The eastern coyote is a new predator on the scene. But where did it come from and why is it so much larger than its western cousins? Learn about how this animal came to be and the important ecological niches it is filling in the Northeast. A coyote stares at the camera. Citizen Scientists Help Track America’s Rarest Thrush Citizen scientists are help the Vermont Center for Ecostudies to monitor mountain bird populations and the rare Bicknell's Thrush along northeastern portions of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail. A citizen scientist helps monitor mountain birds Ridge Phase of Bald Mountain Pond - Conserved Forever! On June 27, 2019, the Trust for Public Land conveyed 1,495 acres along the Ridge of Moxie Bald Mountain in Maine to the National Park Service as an addition to the Appalachian National Scenic Trail. Bald Mountain Pond Partnering to Protect the Appalachian Trail The Appalachian National Scenic Trial stretches over 2,000 miles across 14 states, from Georgia to Maine. Partnerships and volunteer networks are essential to the successful maintenance and management of the trail. The National Park Service, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, and U.S. Forest Service work together and with the various trail maintaining clubs and local communities along the length of the trail to coordinate stewardship efforts. A metal railroad bride crosses a river in front of a rocky and tree-covered hill National Park Getaway: Appalachian National Scenic Trail The Appalachian National Scenic Trail is the oldest, continuously marked, and publicly protected trail in the United States. Traversing 14 states, from Georgia to Maine, hikers can experience breathtaking scenic vistas, wilderness areas untouched by development, the serenity of nature, and the significance of history along the nearly 2,200-mile world-renowned trail. Hiker on the Appalachian Trail in a wooded area NETN Field Note: Deer, Worms, and Invasives When too many deer, earthworms, and invasive plant species work i concert, detrimental effects happen to the health of northeastern forests. Forest health monitoring NETN Species Spotlight - Turkey and Black Vultures Vultures have the thankless job of cleaning the environment up of dead animal carcasses. Learn how they are able to do it without getting sick from deadly bacteria. Close-up of a Black Vulture. Doug Greenberg. NETN Species Spotlight - Sharp-shinned Hawk About the size of a Blue-Jay, Sharp-shinned Hawks are aerial acrobats and are the smallest of three North American agile hawks known as the accipiters (ah-sip-it-ers). Learn more about this amazing and oft misunderstood hawk. Sharp-shinned Hawk perched on a branch NETN Species Spotlight - Snowshoe Hare Snowshoe hare are perfectly adapted to their cold, snow environments. Even so, a warming climate and a complex predator/prey relationship has a large influence on their overall population. The enormous hind feet of snowshoe hare. NETN Species Spotlight - Ruffed Grouse Ruffed Grouse have evolved many effective and surprising traits that allow them to survive northeastern winters. Ruffed Grouse displaying Lucas Bobay Crystal Clear: Appalachian Trail MEGA-Transect Atmospheric Deposition Effects Study The Appalachian National Scenic Trail is a 2,184 mile long public footpath that traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally rich lands of the Appalachian Mountains. Much of the trail follows ridge tops, and these high elevation and ridge-top ecosystems are very sensitive to acidic deposition. Potential consequences of increased acidification include forest die-back and streams that are no longer able to support certain sensitive fish species. green field with mountains in background. A.T. Seasons Project A.T. Seasons monitors plants and animals with large geographic ranges that are relatively common along the Appalachian Trail. Volunteers use a mobile app or the Phenology Project’s portal in Nature’s Notebook to record their data digitally. Several hundred volunteers have provided almost 400,000 observations from every state the AT encompasses. Data shows how the changing rate of spring advancement between the southern and northern trail impacts various species. Students participate in the AT Seasons project Tick surveillance and disease prevention on the Appalachian Trail A study compares the occurrence of ticks in shelters and camping areas with that on the trailside along the entire length of the Appalachian Trail, where tickborne diseases are one of the greatest health hazards to hikers; the article also discusses preventive measures. Adult black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis) NETN Species Spotlight - Short-tailed Weasel The short-tailed weasel is as energetic as it is resourceful. It has had a reputation of being both virtuous and vile over the centuries. Find out more about the amazing capabilities of this slender member of the weasel family An ermine in full white. NETN Species Spotlight - Paper Birch The Paper Birch is undeniably a tree of the north woods. Entwined in lore and legend, it has been a key part of ecosystems and cultures since well before the time of the Neanderthals even. Paper birch trees in winter. Connecting Appalachian Trail, Conservation Landscapes, and Communities Learn about an important partnership to help conserve the Appalachian Trail. (May 2020) venn diagram that explains the Appalachian Trail Cooperative Management structure NETN Species Spotlight - Serviceberry Though it goes by many names, the serviceberry tree is much loved by people and birds alike. Learn more about one of spring's first bloomers and why you should plant one in your yard. Serviceberries ripening. Species Spotlight - Puffballs Puffballl mushrooms offer many joys - from stomping on them as children to eating them fried with butter. Learn more about this natural history of this fascinating fungi. Puffball emitting spores. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Crystal Clear: A Call to Action In 2016, the nation celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS) as the steward of special places that represent our natural and cultural heritage. Many national parks were founded on the beauty and value of water. Since the preservation of the Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in 1872, the National Park System has grown to include significant examples within majestic rivers, the Great Lakes, oceans and coasts, and other spectacular water resources. bright blue lake green islands in between The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Proterozoic Eon—2.5 Billion to 541 MYA The Proterozoic Eon is the most recent division of the Precambrian. It is also the longest geologic eon, beginning 2.5 billion years ago and ending 541 million years ago fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Species Spotlight - Cecropia Moth Cecropia moths are the largest moth in North America. Their fascinating one-year life cycle is one of the most amazing transformations known to nature. Face of a male cecropia moth.

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