"Arlington House in Photos" by NPS , public domain

Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial

National Memorial - Virginia

Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial, formerly named the Custis-Lee Mansion, is a Greek revival style mansion located in Arlington, Virginia, United States that was once the home of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. It overlooks the Potomac River and the National Mall in Washington, D.C. During the American Civil War, the grounds of the mansion were selected as the site of Arlington National Cemetery, in part to ensure that Lee would never again be able to return to his home.

maps

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).George Washington - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of National Mall and Memorial Parks in Washington D.C. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Mall and Memorial Parks - National Heritage Areas

Official visitor map of National Mall and Memorial Parks in Washington D.C. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Rock Creek Park in District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Rock Creek Park - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Rock Creek Park in District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/appa/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arlington_House,_The_Robert_E._Lee_Memorial Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial, formerly named the Custis-Lee Mansion, is a Greek revival style mansion located in Arlington, Virginia, United States that was once the home of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. It overlooks the Potomac River and the National Mall in Washington, D.C. During the American Civil War, the grounds of the mansion were selected as the site of Arlington National Cemetery, in part to ensure that Lee would never again be able to return to his home. Arlington House is the nation’s memorial to Robert E. Lee. It honors him for specific reasons, including his role in promoting peace and reunion after the Civil War. In a larger sense it exists as a place of study and contemplation of the meaning of some of the most difficult aspects of American history: military service; sacrifice; citizenship; duty; loyalty; slavery and freedom. Public Transportation: The Memorial is accessible by the Blue Line of the Metro subway system. The Arlington Cemetery subway station is near the Visitor Center for the cemetery. Car: Arlington House is located inside Arlington National Cemetery. If you plan to come in a vehicle, the nearest parking is in the Arlington National Cemetery parking garage. From the entrance and Welcome Center at Arlington National Cemetery, one can walk up the hill to Arlington House (approximately 15 minutes-steep) Arlington House Temporary Visitor Center While Arlington House undergoes a $12.35 million rehabilitation, be sure to visit the ranger staff and see our temporary visitor center and museum exhibits located inside the Women in Military Service for America Memorial near the entrance to Arlington National Cemetery. Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial Columns of Arlington House Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial Arlington House - Aerial photo Aerial view of Arlington House surrounded by fall foliage. This image was captured from a manned helicopter flight. Arlington House Interior Portraits hang on the walls of the parlor room with red velvet furniture and a small dining table. The parlor room in Arlington House View from Arlington House A park ranger talks to people overlooking Washington, DC Get great views of Washington, DC, from Arlington House! Faux-painting and the Columns of Arlington House The columns of Arlington House Arlington House columns during re-painting Women Amidst War The extreme demands of wartime industry and the loss of traditional family breadwinners to military service caused hardship, but also presented opportunities to women for employment, volunteerism, and activism that previously had been unavailable to them. While many of these gains would be temporary, the Civil War nonetheless represents an important step forward in American society's view of the role of women. Women were increasingly seen (and saw themselves) as the foundat Photo of women at a house on the Cedar Mountain battlefield Reconstruction During Reconstruction, the Federal government pursued a program of political, social, and economic restructuring across the South-including an attempt to accord legal equality and political power to former slaves. Reconstruction became a struggle over the meaning of freedom, with former slaves, former slaveholders and Northerners adopting divergent definitions. Faced with increasing opposition by white Southerners and some Northerners, however, the government abandoned effor Picture depictsing former slaves and free blacks voting following the passage of the 15th amendment War to the Hilt The Civil War ushered in a new era of warfare in which the effects of war were felt beyond the battlefield, including confiscation of civilians' personal property, holding prisoners for strategic purposes, and scorched earth military policy. Photo of Union troops at Arlington House Arlington House Project Robert E. Lee returns to Harpers Ferry after 160 years! These proofs represent but one component of a collaboration between historic furnishing, conservation, waysides, AV media, and some custom in-house work. The Civilian Experience in the Civil War After being mere spectators at the war's early battles, civilians both near and far from the battlefields became unwilling participants and victims of the war as its toll of blood and treasure grew year after year. In response to the hardships imposed upon their fellow citizens by the war, civilians on both sides mobilized to provide comfort, encouragement, and material, and began to expect that their government should do the same. Painting of civilians under fire during the Siege of Vicksburg Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial Cultural Landscape Arlington House: The Robert E. Lee Memorial is located within Arlington National Cemetery and is managed by the National Park Service. Three main periods of significance can be traced to the site. In 1802-1861, the Custis and Lee families used the estate as a residence. In 1861-1865, the property was used as the headquarters for the Army of the Potomac during the Civil War. In 1865-1880, the site was transformed into a national cemetery. High angle view of maintained lawn in front of Arlington House, fronted by tall columns. The Civil War in American Memory America's cultural memories of the Civil War are inseparably intertwined with that most "peculiar institution" of American history - racial slavery. But in the struggle over Civil War memory which began as soon as the war was over and continues to this day, rival cultural memories of reconciliation and white supremacy have often prevailed. Therein lies the challenge as the National Park Service - a public agency - seeks to "provide understanding" of the Civil War era's lasting impact upon the development of our nation. Elderly Union and Confederate veterans shake hands at the fiftieth anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg Explore DC’s national parks with a new, free app Navigate to popular destinations, get up-to-date information and discover lesser-known parks. With nearly 800 points of interest, the app includes the National Mall, President's Park, Rock Creek Park, Anacostia Park, Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, Wolf Trap, Arlington House, Theodore Roosevelt Island, Frederick Douglass NHS, Mary McLeod Bethune Council House NHS, Carter G. Woodson NHS, and hundreds more. National Park Service logo with Washington Monument and other memorials. First Official National Decoration Day James A. Garfield gave the first Decoration Day speech at Arlington National Cemetery on May 30, 1868. Read the speech here. picture of President James A. Garfield Brood X Periodical Cicadas FAQ Learn about the Brood X periodical cicadas that will emerge in 2021 throughout the Mid-Atlantic U.S. A perched periodical cicada with red eyes and orange wings September 11, 2001, NPS Oral History Project This oral history project recorded the memories and perspectives of NPS staff who experienced the events of 9/11 and their aftermath. Transcripts and a 2004 report about the NPS response are available online. A petinad hand holds a flame aloft in the air. Sea Level Rise in the DC Area Learn about current and projected rates of sea level rise in the greater DC area, based on local water level data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) A tall white cylinder attached to a wooden pier with Hains Point in the background.
Selina Gray’s quarters Summer Kitchen/ George Clark’s quarters Black History Exhibit North Wing Entrance Store Room Hunting Hall Conservatory Morning Room Office and Studio White Parlor Center Hall Dining Room Family Parlor Entrance PORTICO Bath and Water Closet Outer Hall Pantry Inner Hall Guest Chamber Mr. and Mrs. Custis’ Chamber School and Sewing Room
Mrs. Lee’s Dressing Room Girls’ Dressing Room Upper Hall Col. and Mrs. Lee’s Chamber Girls’ Chamber Boys’ Chamber Miss Mary’s Chamber Small Chamber

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