"Badlands National Park" by NPS Photo / Mackenzie Reed , public domain

Badlands

National Park - South Dakota

Badlands National Park is located in southwestern South Dakota. The park protects sharply eroded buttes and pinnacles, along with the largest undisturbed mixed grass prairie in the United States. The park is one site where the black-footed ferret, one of the most endangered mammals in the world, was reintroduced to the wild. The South Unit, or Stronghold District, includes sites of 1890s Ghost Dances, a former United States Air Force bomb and gunnery range, and Red Shirt Table, the park's highest point at 3,340 feet (1,020 m).

maps

Official Visitor Map of Badlands National Park (NP) in South Dakota. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Badlands - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Badlands National Park (NP) in South Dakota. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail of the official visitor map of Badlands National Park (NP) in South Dakota. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Badlands - Visitor Map Detail

Detail of the official visitor map of Badlands National Park (NP) in South Dakota. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/badl/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Badlands_National_Park Badlands National Park is located in southwestern South Dakota. The park protects sharply eroded buttes and pinnacles, along with the largest undisturbed mixed grass prairie in the United States. The park is one site where the black-footed ferret, one of the most endangered mammals in the world, was reintroduced to the wild. The South Unit, or Stronghold District, includes sites of 1890s Ghost Dances, a former United States Air Force bomb and gunnery range, and Red Shirt Table, the park's highest point at 3,340 feet (1,020 m). The rugged beauty of the Badlands draws visitors from around the world. These striking geologic deposits contain one of the world’s richest fossil beds. Ancient horses and rhinos once roamed here. The park’s 244,000 acres protect an expanse of mixed-grass prairie where bison, bighorn sheep, prairie dogs, and black-footed ferrets live today. Badlands National Park is located 75 miles east of Rapid City, South Dakota. Physical Addresses for GPS* Park Headquarters: 25216 Ben Reifel Road, Interior, SD 57750. Northeast Entrance (I-90, Exit 131): 21020 SD Hwy 240, Interior, SD 57750. Pinnacles Entrance (I-90, Exit 110): 24240 Hwy 240, Wall, SD 57790. Interior Entrance: 20640 SD Hwy 377, Interior, SD 57750. Ben Reifel Visitor Center Located at park headquarters, the Ben Reifel Visitor Center features exhibits, an air conditioned theater,and restroom facilities. The visitor center is located several miles south of exit 131 off of Interstate I-90. It is also accessible via Highway 44 through the town of Interior. White River Visitor Center The visitor center is located on the Pine Ridge Reservation and offers a staffed information desk, exhibits, restrooms, picnic tables, and water. Impromptu talks are available by request. This visitor center is only open during the summer season. The visitor center is located on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. It lies at the intersection of BIA 2 and BIA 27. It is approximately 30 miles south of Scenic, SD, and 60 miles east of Hermosa via Highway 40. Cedar Pass Campground Located near the Ben Reifel Visitor Center, the Cedar Pass Campground has 96 level sites with scenic views of the badlands formations. This campground offers flush toilets and coin operated showers in the summertime. Tent 23.00 Campsites for tent camping for 2 persons are equipped with a shaded picnic table. Surrounded by spectacular views of the Badlands. All sites within short walk of pay showers and bathrooms. Near amphitheater for National Park Service evening programs during the summer. Easy access to Cedar Pass Lodge and Restaurant. RV Sites 38.00 Cedar Pass Campground offers RV sites with electric only service. Septic dump available nearby for $1. All sites include shaded picnic table area. A 14-night limit applies during the summer. Electric only service. No water or sewer. Campground has pay showers, flush toilets and water nearby. Group Campsites 40.00 There are four "group" campsites that can be reserved in advance by calling(605) 433-5460. The cost is $3 per person with a minimum fee of $35. The campsites can accommodate 6-25 people accumulatively. Cedar Pass Campground Views dark plants take root in a large pile of debris crumbling down the side of a jagged badlands butte. Cedar Pass Campground is just a short walk away from stunning views of Cedar Pass. Sage Creek Campground Sage Creek Campground is a primitive campground. There is no charge to stay here and camping is available on a first come first serve basis. The campground rarely fills to capacity. Sage Creek Primitive Campground 0.00 Tent camping and RV camping is allowed. The road in the campground as well as the road leading to the campground are gravel roads. When it rains these roads can become difficult to traverse. There is no fee to camp in this campground. No fires or open flame permitted. Sage Creek Campground 001 Rolling green hills of grass with juniper trees under blue sky. The area surrounding the campground hosts one of the last mixed-grass prairies in the country. Sage Creek Campground 002 Dirt road meanders around several camping sites amid prairie grass and under blue sky. The campground is first-come, first-serve and frequently reaches capacity during busy months. Sage Creek Campground 003 Dirt path travels along brown prairie grasses under blue sky. Seasonal changes and extreme weather make careful planning a necessity for enjoying the campground. Sage Creek Campground 004 Muddy meandering creek exposes badlands formations under blue sky. No water in the Badlands is potable. Bring everything you need. Sage Creek Campground 005 Dozens of bison graze green grasses with layers badlands buttes in the background. The campground is in the bison area and so be aware when exploring the campground and surrounding environs. Badlands Storm Layered badlands formations behind fields of green grass under cloudy and billowing clouds. Summer storms are frequently violent and unpredictable. Badlands Yellow Mounds The yellow mounds are peaking out of the formations in this photo. The yellow mounds are peaking out of the formations in this photo. Badlands Rugged Peaks Badlands formations are very rugged and often have sharp peaks. Badlands formations are very rugged and often have sharp peaks. Clover Landscape Jagged badlands buttes extended in horizon amid yellow flowers under a blue sky. The park has seasonal changes in colors so plan ahead! Badlands in the Winter road leading between snow covered badlands formations Winter in Badlands National Park often creates snow covered wonderlands throughout the park. 2019 Connecting with our Homelands Awardees Hopa Mountain, in partnership with the National Park Service, is pleased to announce the 2019 awardees of the Connecting with our Homelands travel grants. Twenty-one Indigenous organizations, schools, and nonprofits have been awarded travel funds for trips to national park units across 12 states/territories within the United States. An elder and young student talk while sitting on a rock. PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Badlands National Park, South Dakota Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] badlands erosional landforms NPS Paleontologist Rachel Benton retires from Badlands National Park Paleontologist Rachel Benton retires from Badlands National Park after 34 years with the National Park Service. Woman in ranger uniform with blue skies behind her Landbird Monitoring in Badlands National Park Landbird monitoring has been conducted at Badlands National Park since 2012. The park lies at an avian crossroads where both eastern and western species can be observed small black songbird with striking buff patch on head and white back perches on a twig Kylie's Fossil Find In May of 2010, seven-year-old Kylie Ferguson, from Georgia, participated in a Jr. Paleontologist program at Badlands National Park, South Dakota. Just a few hundred feet from the visitor center, Kylie found a rare museum-quality saber tooth cat skull. Young girl in hiking attire standing amid badlands formations on a sunny day. Park Air Profiles - Badlands National Park Air quality profile for Badlands National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Badlands NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Badlands NP. Scenery at Norbeck Pass, Badlands National Park Bat Acoustic Monitoring at Badlands National Park Badlands National Park contains rugged badlands and a large expanse of mixed-grass prairie. The unique physiographic environment of the park supports a bat community very different from other parks in the Northern Great Plains Network. We monitor bats here to learn about the current status of their populations and to look at long-term trends, particularly since the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome has arrived at the park. Close up of very fluffy brown bat head, with white tipped fur Bison Bellows: Badlands National Park Meet the bison heard of Badlands National Park! A bison roaming a grassy green field in Badlands National Park Look Under Your Feet, the Past is There As part of a residency at Badlands, Leslie McMurtry composed an audio drama, "Look Under Your Feet, the Past is There." drawings of native americans, pioneers, and modern humans Plant Community Monitoring at Badlands National Park Plant community monitoring has been carried out at Badlands National Park since 2011. The park, in southwestern South Dakota, protects one of the largest expanses of mixed-grass prairie in the U.S. We monitor the native and nonnative plants on the park to assess the health of park ecosystems. close up of a small dome shaped plant, with narrow leaves and small white flowers in a sand dune Bison Conservation Initiative The 2008 BCI has been a touchstone for DOI bureaus for 12 years. The commitments made there have now resulted in meaningful technical products and organizational improvements that continue to advance the conservation of American bison. The Bison Working Group, established as a mechanism for implementing the 2008 BCI, quickly became a productive model of interagency collaboration. Federal professionals working in support of bison conservation note that today we enjoy an ... Bison Conservation Initiative Northern Great Plains Annual Brome Adaptive Management Project Management and restoration of high quality, mixed-grass prairie to the NPS units has proved difficult and complex. The Annual Brome Adaptive Management project (ABAM) is attacking this problem through a cooperative effort. A firefighter uses a driptorch to ignite dried grasses while dark smoke billows behind. Population Viability Study This study confirms that management of DOI bison herds in isolation promotes the loss of genetic diversity within all herds. More importantly, this study demonstrates that increased herd size and targeted removal strategies can reduce rates of diversity loss, and that adopting a Departmental metapopulation strategy through facilitated periodic movement of modest numbers of bison among DOI herds (i.e., restoring effective gene flow) can substantially reduce the... Bison Population Viability Study Fossil Lab: Frequently Asked Questions Got a question about the Fossil Lab? Check out our Frequently Asked Questions! a fragment of fossil teeth sits atop smooth dry mud. Good Times in the Badlands—Science, Education, and Public Interpretation in a Unique Fossil Preparation Lab Following the discovery of a significant saber tooth cat-like skull (Hoplophoneus primaevus, Family: Nimravidae) in 2012, the Badlands Fossil Preparation Lab opened to the visiting public to showcase fossil preparation work. A sample of fossils prepared during the 2019 season Fossil Lab: Current Projects Current projects being under taken by Badlands' fossil preparation lab. Two hands hold a small white oval object with light shining on it. The Big Pig Dig The Big Pig Dig was one of the longest paleontology digs in Badlands National Park, recovering almost 20,000 fossils. two paleontologists work in a large pit surrounded by tools and flags identifying fossils. South Unit of Badlands National Park Learn more about the history of Badlands National Park's South Unit. For more information, visit the White River Visitor Center. the white river meandering through the fields with badlands formations in the background. Reptiles of the Badlands Badlands National Park is a home for many reptile species, including snakes, lizards, and turtles. Read about these critters and their lives in the park here. a painted turtle sticks its head out of a patterned shell while sitting in green grass. Pronghorn: Racers on the Great Plains What Badlands animal can reach top speeds of 55 miles per hour and is most closely related to the giraffe? Pronghorn! Read more about these animals and the lives they lead here. a pronghorn looks into the distance with its white facial markings and pronged horns. Prairie Rattlesnakes in the Badlands Learn about Prairie Rattlesnakes and the role they play in Badlands National Park. a prairie rattlesnake coils up in a defensive posture, with its tongue and tail sticking out. Oreodont: Ancient Grazer of the Badlands An overview of the significance and science behind the oreodont fossils found in the Badlands Small jaw held by human hands exposing sharp teeth Implications of Climate Scenarios for Badlands National Park Resource Management Badlands National Park hosts a myriad of natural and cultural resources, including bison and black-footed ferrets, the mixed grass prairie in which they live, fossils from animals that lived 23-75 million years ago, and historic buildings, trails, and roads. All are sensitive to climate, but anticipating precisely how climate change will affect each is difficult. Despite this challenge, park managers must make forward-looking decisions and act to meet management goals. a single streak of lightning cracks above black silhouetted badlands formations a dark sky above Hunting Sky High: Birds of Prey in the Badlands Birds of prey are birds that hunt and eat vertebrate animals as opposed to insects or berries. Learn more about these incredible animals in this article. a hawk flies with its wings spread out and shoulders hunched The Dawes Act The Dawes Act had a major impact on Native Americans in the age of homesteading. How did it affect Native Americans and why was it put in place? Read this article to find out. a black and white photograph shows a tipi decorated with hand painted images of animals. Badlands Mixed-grass Prairies Learn about the incredible mixed-grass prairies preserved in Badlands National Park, the creatures that call these grasslands home, the history of today's fractured prairies, and the people working to preserve them. long green grasses with oblong seed pods sway in front of buff badlands formations. Clastic Dikes: Backbones of the Badlands Why don't the jagged peaks of Badlands formations crumble with new rainfall? Because they are held up by geologic features called clastic dikes, which have puzzled geologists for centuries. Learn more about these curious rock features in this article! a green line runs vertically through a peak of brown badlands rock. Brontothere: Large beasts of the Badlands A short article about brontotheres -- an extinct mammal -- and their significance in the fossil record. a large rhino-like creature in a subtropical forest with its offspring Geologic Formations: How Badlands Buttes Came to Be Badlands buttes contain millions of years of history. Learn how these formation came to be and what kind of stories are preserved within them. badlands buttes with bright red stripes descend into green prairie grasses below. Amphibians: Unlikely Inhabitants of the Badlands Although the Badlands seems like an unlikely home for amphibians, the park hosts eight species. Learn more about these critters and their lives in the Badlands in this article. a brownish green toad sits in green grasses. A Sod Story: Ancient Prairies of the Badlands Curious about why certain patches of prairie sit above the rest? Read this article to learn more about sod tables and why they're important in Badlands National Park today. an elevated patch of prairie with steep, exposed sod stands above green grass and badlands canyons. Black-footed Ferret: Rebounding in the Badlands Black-footed Ferrets are one of the most endangered species in the North America, and Badlands National Park contains one of the world's only self-sustaining populations. Read this article to learn more about these fascinating critters. a ferret sticks its head out of a burrow with badlands and a pink sunset in the background Bison, Buffalo, Tatanka: Bovids of the Badlands The story of the Bison is central to the cultural and scientific heritage of people and their environment in North America. This article discusses these aspects in relationship to South Dakota and Badlands National Park. Profile view of a single bison laying in yellow prairie grasses Bighorn Sheep in the Badlands Bighorn sheep are one of the most iconic Badlands mammals. Learn about their natural history, daily activities, and life in Badlands National Park in this article. a bighorn sheep with a goofy smile and eyes closed Badlands National Park's Stronghold District Short article about the history of the Stronghold District of Badlands National Park. a grove of junipers lead down into badlands formations which continue into the horizon. Badlands Butterflies Hikers in Badlands National Park often notice butterflies floating through prairie grasses. Learn about the different butterfly species of the Badlands in this article. an orange and black butterfly with white spots spreads both of its wings while resting on the ground Badlands Birds 206 bird species have been documented in Badlands National Park. Read about the birds of the Badlands and access a species list for the park in this article. a redwing blackbird perches on a stalk of grass surrounded by other grasses and small yellow buds. Badlands Aerial Gunnery Range The US Air Force seized over 130,000 acres of Badlands National Monument (located on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation) during World War II for use as a practice bombing range. Read more about the story in this article. a grove of junipers lead down into badlands formations which continue into the horizon. Archaeology: Ancient People of the Badlands Learn more about the archaeological finds at Badlands National Park. a collection of various worked stones laid out on a cloth surface. Fossil Lab: Curation & Preservation What happens to fossils after paleontologists finish prepping them? Learn more about Badlands collections and the post-lab life of a fossil here. a series of fossils in styrofoam boxes sit next to each other, neatly organized. Nimravid: Saber-toothed Hunter of the Badlands Nimravids, false saber-tooth cats, would have prowled the Badlands millions of years ago. One of their skulls was found by a 7 year-old visitor named Kylie Ferguson. a skull with saber teeth sits on a platform with various fossil fragments surrounding it Night Skies: Beyond the Badlands Badlands National Park is the home to dark night skies, which are perfect for stargazing. Learn about the different sights in the night sky and Badlands night sky programs in this article. a single triangular badlands butte stretches up into a dark starry sky. Mosasaur: Apex Predator of the Western Interior Seaway Mosasaurs were marine reptiles which once swam through the ancient warm waters of South Dakota. Learn more about these fascinating creatures in this article. a marine reptile swims through water and closes its jaws around a long, shelled squidlike creature. Mako Sica: Naming the Badlands How did the Badlands get its name? It seems like a strange name for a place so rich in natural resources -- learn about how the name "Badlands" came to be in this article. a historic black and white photograph shows the park sign reading entering badlands national park Prairie Dogs: Pipsqueaks of the Prairie Prairie Dogs' role in prairie ecosystems of the Great Plains Two prairie dogs playing in the grass Paleontology in the White River Badlands Oreodonts are one of the most common fossils found in Badlands National Park. Read this article to learn more about this ancient mammal. a scientist a small skull and using a small pick to remove rock from the teeth. Fossil Lab: What happens in the lab? An overview of what happens in Badlands' fossil preparation lab. Two people in white lab coats crouch aside large round object. Fossil Lab: How are fossils found? Who finds the fossils of Badlands National Park? Once they are found, how do they get from the ground to the lab? Read this article to find out! a man uses tools like a hammer to chip away at hard brown sandstone. National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Homesteading in the Badlands Many homesteaders called the Badlands area home, using their plots to ranch cattle. What kind of struggles did homesteaders face? What rewards were they working towards? Find out in this article. a family of six stands in front of a two-story wooden home in a historic black and white photograph. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Series: Wildlife in the Badlands Ever wonder what kind of wildlife could survive the harsh climate of the Badlands? Two small, grey young lambs walk down brown badlands slope. Series: Research in Badlands National Park Scientists often look to the Badlands as a research subject. Many studies have been conducted in the park on a variety of topics, including paleontology, geology, biology, and archaeology. Learn more about these research topics in this article series. two researchers converse over a sheet of paper while a woman to their right uses a microscope. Series: Prairie Ecology of the Badlands Badlands National Park is home to the nation's largest expanse of mixed-grass prairie. Here, plant species from both short-grass and tall-grass prairies mingle to create a unique home, well suited to many animals which call the park home. roots of tall yellow grasses penetrate into light brown soil beneath a cloudy blue sky. Series: Badlands Geology and Paleontology Badlands National Park is well-known for its geology and paleontology. Fossils found in the park range from 75- to 28-million years old and many are in excellent condition. The flat-lying layers of the park's formation represent classic sedimentary rock layers. a layered badlands butte's jagged edges reach into a bright blue sky. Series: History & Culture in the Badlands Curious about the history and culture of Badlands National Park? Look no further! Read the articles in this series to learn about the different cultures and stories of the park, from people living there 12,000 years ago right up to its use as a bombing range during WWII. a black and white historic photo of a sign reading "Badlands National Monument." Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 11, No. 2, Fall 2019 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> devils tower Series: Plant Community Monitoring in Northern Great Plains Network Parks Plant communities are essential components of all major ecosystems. Plants are the ultimate source of food for other organisms and the main source of organic material in soil and water. They also influence climate and provide the scenery that park visitors enjoy. The NPS Northern Great Plains Network monitors the number, identity, and relative abundance of plant species, as well as their horizontal cover and vertical structure, to determine the health of park ecosystems. Two people sitting on the ground looking at plants Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 11, No. 1, Spring 2019 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> Tule Springs Fossil Beds Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Series: Kids in Paleo Meet some aspiring paleontologists. boy in lab coat Women & Paleontology in the Badlands Although Badlands National Park is proud to employ many female paleontologists today, this scientific field was not always accepting of women. In this article, learn about how women's roles in paleontology have changed over years of Badlands research. a woman in a white lab coat uses a small pick while working on a baseball-sized fossil skull. Cretaceous Period—145.0 to 66.0 MYA Many now-arid western parks, including Chaco Culture National Historical Park and Mesa Verde National Park, were inundated by the Cretaceous Interior Seaway that bisected North America. Massive dinosaur and other reptile fossils are found in Cretaceous rocks of Big Bend National Park. dinosaur footprint in stone Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Paleogene Period—66.0 to 23.0 MYA Colorful Paleogene rocks are exposed in the hoodoos of Bryce Canyon National Park and the badlands of Badlands and Theodore Roosevelt national parks. Extraordinary Paleogene fossils are found in Fossil Butte and John Day Fossil Beds national monuments, among other parks. fossil skull with teeth expsoed Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Revisiting The 1940 Badlands Expedition The fossils of the “<strong>Protoceras</strong> channels” of the classic White River Badlands series are also among the least known. A joint South Dakota School of Mines and Technology–National Geographic expedition in 1940 collected fossils from these beds in what is now part of the South Unit of Badlands National Park, South Dakota. Field surveying in 2011 established the location of the 1940 base camp. several people stand for a group photo in badlands Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 13, No. 1, Spring 2021 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> park ranger in uniform

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