"Rainbow at Tyuonyi" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Bandelier

National Monument - New Mexico

Bandelier National Monument is a 33,677-acre United States National Monument near Los Alamos in Sandoval and Los Alamos Counties, New Mexico. The monument preserves the homes and territory of the Ancestral Puebloans of a later era in the Southwest.

location

maps

Official Visitor Map of Santa Fe National Historic Trail (NHT) in Colorado, Kansas, Misouri, New Mexico and Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Santa Fe - National Historic Trail

Official Visitor Map of Santa Fe National Historic Trail (NHT) in Colorado, Kansas, Misouri, New Mexico and Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Bandelier National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Bandelier - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Bandelier National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail of the official visitor map of Bandelier National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Bandelier - Visitor Map Detail

Detail of the official visitor map of Bandelier National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Southwestern area of Santa Fe National Forest (NF) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Santa Fe MVUM - Southwest 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Southwestern area of Santa Fe National Forest (NF) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

https://www.nps.gov/band/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bandelier_National_Monument Bandelier National Monument is a 33,677-acre United States National Monument near Los Alamos in Sandoval and Los Alamos Counties, New Mexico. The monument preserves the homes and territory of the Ancestral Puebloans of a later era in the Southwest. Bandelier National Monument protects over 33,000 acres of rugged but beautiful canyon and mesa country as well as evidence of a human presence here going back over 11,000 years. Petroglyphs, dwellings carved into the soft rock cliffs, and standing masonry walls pay tribute to the early days of a culture that still survives in the surrounding communities. From NM285 US84 in Pojaque NM. West on NM502, West on NM4 to White rock. Then 12 miles to the monument entrance on the south side of the road. Bandelier National Monument Visitor Center Main Visitor Center for Bandelier National Monument located in the main Frijoles Canyon area Directions from Santa Fe 1 hour each way Take Saint Francis Drive (HWY 84/285) north toward Los Alamos. After passing Pojoaque, merge right onto New Mexico 502 to Los Alamos. Continue up 502 toward Los Alamos. Bear right and exit onto New Mexico 4 towards White Rock. Continue for 12 miles, passing White Rock. Bandelier's entrance is on your left. Juniper Family Campground 3 loops, 52 site campground near the entrance to the monument. 2 sites for small groups up to 20 people. No reservations. First come, first serve except for the 2 group sites. Per site, 2 cars 12.00 Per night, per campsite, up to 2 vehicles Juniper Campground site a site at Juniper Campground Some sites are perfect for small trailers. Juniper Campground site with bigger trees Juniper Campground site with bigger trees Juniper Campground site with bigger trees Juniper Campground pull through site for larger vehicles Juniper Campground pull through A pull through site in Juniper Family Campground. Juniper Campground restrooms restrooms at Juniper Campground flush toilets at Juniper Campground Dump station at Juniper Campground dump station at Juniper Campground dump station at Juniper Campground, closed when freezing temps at night Parking at Ponderosa Campground Parking at Ponderosa Campground Parking at Ponderosa Campground Ponderosa Ponderosa group campground is open year round, with water available May - October only. Site is available by reservation only. Group camping fee 35.00 Fee per night, per campsite, per group Ponderosa Group Campground an image of a wooden structure and a covered picnic area with large green trees Ponderosa Group Campground Ponderosa Group Campground Picnic Shelter an image of an open sided but covered picnic shelter with big green trees all around Ponderosa Group Campground Picnic Shelter Tyuonyi the village of Tyuonyi A view of Tyuonyi and the cliff dwelling in Frijoles Canyon from the mesa. View from a Cavate Tyuonyi from a cavate A view of Tyuonyi from a cavate along the Main Loop Trail in Frijoles Canyon. Long House archeological sites in Frijoles Canyon A view of Long House dwellings from the mesa top. Frijoles Canyon a view of Frijoles Canyon from the rim A view of Frijoles Canyon from the Frey Trail Cerro Grande a view of the Valles Caldera from Cerro Grande A view of the Valles Caldera from Cerro Grande, the highest point in Bandelier. The Rio Grande a view of the Rio Grande A view of the Rio Grande, the lowest point in Bandelier, from the mesa above Frijoles Canyon Visitor Center visitor center in winter Bandelier visitor center in winter Park Air Profiles - Bandelier National Monument Air quality profile for Bandelier National Monument. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Bandelier NM as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Bandelier NM. Castle Kiva in winter National Park Getaway: Bandelier National Monument Explore the rugged, volcanic landscape of northern New Mexico. Archaeological ruins and petroglyphs give a glimpse into the lives of the Ancestral Puebloans who settled the area hundreds of years ago. Two visitors looking inside a Pueblo ruin Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship of Birds of Conservation Concern at Bandelier and Mesa Verde Southern Colorado Plateau Inventory and Monitoring Network bird monitoring allows scientists to track bird numbers, diversity, and habitat relationships. However, it is less able to identify reasons for changes in bird populations. The Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship program (MAPS) is complementary in that regard. It collects demographic data such as bird reproduction and survival rates. Bandelier and Mesa Verde implemented MAPS programs in 2010. Wildlife biology intern demonstrates the proper way to hold a bird. National Park Service Staff Explore Strategies for Success at Leadership Conference With a goal of creating better leaders and promoting gender balance, the 2016 Women and Leadership Conference introduced influential policy and business leaders who shared their insights and offered tools to help participants become leaders in their respective fields. A group of men and women stand in front of a blue curtain and an Andrus Center banner. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. steep walled canyon Increasing temperature seasonality may overwhelm shifts in soil moisture to favor shrub over grass dominance in Colorado Plateau drylands Increasing variability of temperature favors a shift to shrublands over grasslands in arid southwestern landscapes. This effect is greater than the effect of increasing soil moisture, which favors a shift to grasslands over shrublands. Grassland with scattered junipers and hills in the background. Bandelier National Monument and Beyond: Inspiring Future Fire Ecologists in Los Alamos County Bandelier National Monument’s Ponderosa Campground, an area that has been impacted by several major wildfires, was a fitting location to meet and learn about Fire Ecology. On June 14th, 2016, Bandelier’s Fire Ecology Crew members met with twenty-three elementary-aged youth from Los Alamos, Bernalillo, and Rio Arriba counties who were attending the Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s (PEEC) Summer Camp. Bandelier’s Fire Ecology Crewmembers talk with PEEC camp participants. Credit: PEEC The Colorado Plateau The Colorado Plateau is centered on the four corners area of the Southwest, and includes much of Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico. Hazy Fajada Butte, Chaco Culture National Monument Monitoring Upland Vegetation and Soils on the Southern Colorado Plateau Vegetation and soils are the foundation upon which all terrestrial ecosystems are built. Soils provide the medium for the storage and delivery of water and nutrients to plants, which in turn provide animal populations with both habitat and food. Sampling grassland vegetation at a long-term monitoring plot at Wupatki National Monument Monitoring Bird Communities on the Southern Colorado Plateau Bird communities can tell us a lot about changing environmental conditions. High on the food chain, and sensitive to climate and habitat changes, birds are monitored on the Southern Colorado Plateau as indicators of riparian and upland ecosystem health. Male Williamson’s sapsucker. Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Bandelier and Beyond: Interagency Partnerships for Fire Ecology Staff of Bandelier NM fire ecology program collect both short- and long-term data to determine whether management objectives are being met, measure the effectiveness of treatments, and determine if additional research is needed. The fire ecology program has assisted other local agencies, parks, and partners in conducting treatment effectiveness assessments. 2013 Harry Yount National Park Ranger Award Being a park ranger comes naturally for Tom Betts – you could even say it's in his blood. As the son of a park ranger, he literally and figuratively grew up honing his outdoor skills in national parks. Currently the chief ranger at Bandelier National Monument, Betts has worked at eight additional national parks during his 32-year National Park Service career. Portrait of Tom Betts Modeling Past and Future Soil Moisture in Southern Colorado Plateau National Parks and Monuments In this project, USGS and NPS scientists used the range of variation in historical climate data to provide context for assessing the relative impact of projected future climate on soil water availability. This report provides the results of modeled SWP generated for 11 ecosystems in nine Southern Colorado Plateau Network parks. Extensive grassland at Wupatki National Monument Monitoring Night Skies and Natural Soundscapes on the Southern Colorado Plateau Many national parks in the Southern Colorado Plateau region contain large areas of wilderness, where dark night skies and natural soundscapes are important human values. Dark night skies, which depend upon the visibility of stars and other natural components, are diminishing resources in several park units because of anthropogenic activities. Natural soundscapes—that is, the natural sounds of wildlands—are degraded by sounds caused by humans or human technology. Clouds and sky turning red and orange over Navajo National Monument at sunset Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. Civilian Conservation Corps at Tumacácori The CCC is one of the most well-remembered and highly regarded programs of the New Deal. Camp NM-1-N, located at Bandelier National Monument in New Mexico, made important contributions to Tumacácori’s visitor center. men with truck and olive tree in courtyard garden 'Mantén Viva la Llama' - 'Keep the Flame Alive!' Mantén Viva la Llama' --'Keep the Flame Alive!’ describes the theme of the Spanish Language Training Exchange (TREX) held near Santa Fe, New Mexico in October of 2019. The two week TREX program brings diverse fire practitioners from many Spanish speaking countries, including Argentina, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, and Spain, together to build skills in prescribed fire, fire management, and fire ecology. monitoring surface vegetation Pollinators - Hummingbirds Hummingbirds (family Trochilidae) are amazingly adapted pollinators, and they play an important role in pollination. A flying hummingbird hovers next to a red flower Monitoring Water Quality on the Southern Colorado Plateau Water quality data are used to characterize waters, detect trends over time, and identify emerging problems. In Southern Colorado Plateau Network parks, water quality is monitored as an indicator of aquatic ecosystem integrity, as a component of watershed condition, and to document water quality conditions in relation to state and federal regulations. Collecting water quality data Bandelier National Monument and Beyond: Bandelier Fire Management in the Los Alamos Community “Water: Where Does it Come From, and Where Does it Go?” This was the question posed to Los Alamos fourth grade students at the 2015 Water Day Festival organized by Pajarito Environmental Education Center. In addition to learning about water conservation, students learned about the effects that water, or the lack of it, can have on the fire environment. Bandelier’s Engine Crew introduces students to the fire engine. Bandelier National Monument and Beyond: International Collaborations in Fire Ecology 'Mantén Viva la Llama' - 'Keep the Flame Alive!' was the theme of this year’s Spanish Language Training Exchange (TREX), held September 15th to October 4th, 2015 in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. Twenty TREX participants traveled from Spain, Guatemala, Argentina, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Mexico to share experiences, learn about prescribed fire, fire management, fire ecology, and restoration practices in forests and grasslands. Fire ecology crew member Nathalie Besse discusses the factors that can contribute to fire severity. Vegetation Characterization and Mapping on the Southern Colorado Plateau Vegetation mapping is a tool used by botanists, ecologists, and land managers to better understand the abundance, diversity, and distribution of different vegetation types across a landscape. Vegetation plots used for the classification and mapping of El Malpais NM Climate Change on the Southern Colorado Plateau The combination of high. elevation and a semi-arid climate makes the Colorado Plateau particularly vulnerable to climate change. Climate models predict that over the next 100 years, the Southwest will become warmer and even more arid, with more extreme droughts than the region has experienced in the recent past. One result of climate change may be more, larger floods, like this flash flood in Glen Canyon NRA Monitoring Aquatic Macroinvertebrates on the Southern Colorado Plateau Aquatic macroinvertebrates, such as insect larvae, snails, and worms, play a vital role in stream ecosystems, both as a food source and as consumers of algae and other organic matter. Because macroinvertebrates are sensitive to environmental change, monitoring them can help to detect chemical, physical, and biological impacts to aquatic ecosystems. Monitoring aquatic macroinvertebrates Southern Colorado Plateau Mammal Inventories Mammal inventories help to close the gap in our knowledge and understanding of some taxonomic groups on the Colorado Plateau. Coyote (Canis latrans) Celebrating soils across the National Park System First in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Fossil soils at Cabrillo National Monument reveal marine deposits Frijoles Canyon Tree Planting: Reforestation Efforts within the Las Conchas Fire Perimeter Bandelier National Monument’s Resource Management and Fire Ecology Programs are collaborating on a spring tree planting and monitoring project in Frijoles Canyon. Within the 2011 Las Conchas fire perimeter, the Frijoles Canyon landscape ranges from low severity burn areas with intact forest to areas that burned at high severity with no mature live trees remaining. Person carries tree seedlings in a backpack. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: The New Deal at Tumacácori The grounds of Tumacácori protect a map of treasures made by men and women during the New Deal era of the 1930's. Will you find them all? black and white photo of young men and truck in walled courtyard garden Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Two for the Price of One Companion, assistant, confidant, ambassador, host, nurse, cook, secretary, editor, field technician, wildlife wrangler, diplomat, and social director are some of the many roles that people who marry into the NPS perform in support of their spouses and the NPS mission. Although the wives and daughters of park rangers were some of the earliest women rangers in the NPS, many more women served as “park wives” in the 1920s–1940s. Three members of a family Substitute Rangers As the 1940s dawned, the United States was still dealing with the economic woes of the Great Depression and trying not to get drawn in WWII. Even as it continued to manage New Deal Program work in national and state parks, the NPS remained understaffed as a government bureau. The emergency relief workers and about 15 percent of NPS staff enlisted or were drafted during the first couple of years of WWII. Winifred Tada, 1940. (Courtesy of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin) Volcanic Craters Different types of volcanoes have craters with different characteristics. Cinder cones, maars, tuff rings, composite volcanoes, and some domes have craters. cinder cone crater Find Your Park on Route 66 Route 66 and the National Park Service have always had an important historical connection. Route 66 was known as the great road west and after World War II families on vacation took to the road in great numbers to visit the many National Park Service sites in the Southwest and beyond. That connection remains very alive and present today. Take a trip down Route 66 and Find Your Park today! A paved road with fields in the distance. On the road is a white Oklahoma Route 66 emblem. Fire, Soil, and Preserving History at Bandelier Bandelier National Monument tells the story of over 10,000 years of Ancestral Pueblo and Spanish history, the evidence of which is threatened by unsustainable land use exacerbated by climate change. Hundreds of ancient cultural sites are endangered as a result. How did Bandelier get this way? Archeological site Maars and Tuff Rings Maars and tuff rings are low-standing pyroclastic cones with large craters that usually form from highly-explosive eruptions caused by the interaction of magma with ground or surface waters. Ubehebe Crater in Death Valley National Park is a maar. lakeshore and tundra Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Volcanic Domes Lava domes are steep-sided rounded accumulations of highly viscous silicic lava over a vent. Some domes are part of composite volcanoes, but large ones can make up their own volcanoes. Lassen Peak is a dome. photo of a rounded hill of blocky rock Cinder Cones Cinder cones are typically simple volcanoes that consist of accumulations of ash and cinders around a vent. Sunset Crater Volcano and Capulin Volcano are cinder cones. photo of a dry grassy field with a cinder cone in the distance Series: Volcanic Features Volcanoes vary greatly in size and shape. Volcanoes also may have a variety of other features, which in turn, have a great range in diversity of form, size, shape, and permanence. Many volcanoes have craters at their summits and/or at the location of other vents. Some craters contain water lakes. Lakes of molten or solidified lava may exist on some volcanoes. Fumaroles and other geothermal features are a product of heat from magma reservoirs and volcanic gases. photo of a lava lake in a summit crater Water Resources on the Colorado Plateau Describes the origin, uses, threats to, and conservation of water on the Colorado Plateau. Dark green body of water winding through red rock formations with brilliant sun overhead.

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