Birmingham Civil Rights

National Monument - Alabama

The Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument is located in Birmingham, Alabama. It preserves and commemorates the work of the Civil Rights Movement. Birmingham was the site of the Birmingham campaign, Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail, the Children's Crusade with its images of students being attacked by water hoses and dogs, the bombing of the Gaston Motel – the movement's headquarters motel now designated as a National Monument – and the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing. The site also resides within the larger 36-acre (15 ha) Birmingham Civil Rights District, which was designated in 1992 by the City of Birmingham.

maps

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/bicr/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birmingham_Civil_Rights_National_Monument The Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument is located in Birmingham, Alabama. It preserves and commemorates the work of the Civil Rights Movement. Birmingham was the site of the Birmingham campaign, Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail, the Children's Crusade with its images of students being attacked by water hoses and dogs, the bombing of the Gaston Motel – the movement's headquarters motel now designated as a National Monument – and the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing. The site also resides within the larger 36-acre (15 ha) Birmingham Civil Rights District, which was designated in 1992 by the City of Birmingham. In 1963, images of snarling police dogs unleashed against non-violent protesters and of children being sprayed with high-pressure hoses appeared in print and television news around the world. These dramatic scenes of violent police aggression against civil rights protesters in Birmingham, Alabama were vivid examples of segregation and racial injustice in America. Via I-65 North or South From I-65, take I-20/59 NE towards Atlanta. Exit at the 17th Street Exit (first exit off of I-20/59). Bear right and proceed to the light. From that light go two blocks to 6th Avenue N. Turn right on to 6th Avenue N. The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute is one block up on your left. A.G. Gaston Motel The interior of the A.G. Gaston Motel is currently closed to the public and updates for the Motel opening will be available on the NPS park website at a later date. Interim Visitor Center The Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument interim visitor center is located at the The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute. Here you can find brochures and the park's passport stamp. The interior of the A.G. Gaston Motel is currently closed to the public and updates for the motel opening will be available on the NPS Park website at a later date. Via I-65 North or South From I-65, take I-20/59 NE towards Atlanta. Exit at the 17th Street Exit (first exit off of I-20/59). Bear right and proceed to the light. From that light go two blocks to 6th Avenue N. Turn right on to 6th Avenue N. The Birmingham Civil Rights Institute is one block up on your left. Mural Sculpture of the four little girls 4 separate statues of the four little girls who were killed in the 16th st Baptist Church bombing Hundreds of people visit Kelly Ingram Park each year to learn about the Civil Rights Movement in Birmingham Kelly Ingram Park foot soldiers statue Statue of a boy being grabbed by a policemen who is holding a dog posed to bite on a leash Statue in Kelly Ingram park dedicated to Birmingham Foot soldiers 16th St. Baptist Church Colored Photo of the front of the 16th St. Baptist Church Hundreds of people visit Birmingham each year to see the 16th St. Baptist Church and learn about its important role in Birmingham's Civil Rights Movement A.G. Gaston Motel Partnership: The City of Birmingham and the National Park Service The Gaston Motel, part of the Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument, is jointly managed by the City of Birmingham and the NPS. At a time when the city enforced the segregation of public accommodations such as parks, playgrounds, hotels, restaurants, theaters, and buses, the Gaston Motel provided a restaurant and accommodations to African American travelers. It played a prominent role during the peak of the Civil Rights Movement. Two men in suits and hats in the parking lot of a motel. The A.G. Gaston Motel and the Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument The A.G. Gaston Motel opened in 1954, built by prominent African American businessman and entrepreneur Arthur George Gaston. It was a significant site of civil rights activities in 1963, when it served as the headquarters of the campaign to desegregate public accommodations in Birmingham, Alabama. From the motel, leaders made critical decisions that advanced the cause of civil rights locally and shaped events and legislation nationally. A.G. Gaston and R.A. Hester, wearing suits, ties, and hats, in the courtyard of Gaston Motel National Park Getaway: Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument Birmingham, Alabama, is a place where snarling dogs snapped at children. A place where police blasted peaceful protesters with fire hoses. A place where inequality and humiliation was baked into every day life for African Americans. But Birmingham is also a place of hope. A place where men, women, and children took a stand for themselves, and for our country. A place where people dared to dream that our nation might truly live up to its promise of liberty and justice for all. Statue of a police officer grabbing a child while holding the leash of an aggressive police dog

also available

National Parks
USFS NW