"Biscayne Bay" by Matt Johnson , public domain

Biscayne

National Park - Florida

Biscayne National Park encompasses coral reefs, islands and shoreline mangrove forest in the northern Florida Keys. Its reefs and islands are accessible only by boat. Dolphins, turtles and pelicans live in Biscayne Bay Lagoon. The underwater Maritime Heritage Trail links dive sites, most of them shipwrecks. On Boca Chita Key, Boca Chita Lighthouse has coastal views. A museum at Convoy Point explains local ecosystems.

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maps

Official visitor map of Biscayne National Park (NP) in Florida. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Biscayne - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Biscayne National Park (NP) in Florida. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/bisc/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biscayne_National_Park Biscayne National Park encompasses coral reefs, islands and shoreline mangrove forest in the northern Florida Keys. Its reefs and islands are accessible only by boat. Dolphins, turtles and pelicans live in Biscayne Bay Lagoon. The underwater Maritime Heritage Trail links dive sites, most of them shipwrecks. On Boca Chita Key, Boca Chita Lighthouse has coastal views. A museum at Convoy Point explains local ecosystems. Within sight of Miami, yet worlds away, Biscayne protects a rare combination of aquamarine waters, emerald islands, and fish-bejeweled coral reefs. Evidence of 10,000 years of human history is here too; from prehistoric tribes to shipwrecks, and pineapple farmers to presidents. For many, the park is a boating, fishing, and diving destination, while others enjoy a warm breeze and peaceful scenery. The Dante Fascell Visitor Center may be reached from the Florida Turnpike by taking Exit 6 (Speedway Boulevard). Turn left from exit ramp and continue south to SW 328th Street (North Canal Drive). Turn left on 328th Street and continue for four miles to the end of the road. The park entrance is on the left just before the entrance to Homestead Bayfront Marina. Dante Fascell Visitor Center The Dante Fascell Visitor Center is located at Convoy Point, 9 miles East of the city of Homestead, Florida. A beautiful museum offers a virtual journey through the park's four ecosystems using dioramas, audio and video. Several films are available to help you learn about the park, including the 20-minute feature presentation: Connections. The Gallery highlights the works of local artists who find inspiration in the park. From the Florida Turnpike take Exit 6 (Speedway Boulevard). Turn left from exit ramp and continue south to SW 328th Street (North Canal Drive). Turn left on 328th Street and continue for four miles to the end of the road. The park entrance is on the left just before the entrance to Homestead Bayfront Marina. Boca Chita Campground Boca Chita campground is located on an island. The only access is by boat. No services are available. Boca Chita Key features an iconic lighthouse and an open, waterside, grassy camping area with picnic tables and grills. Toilets are available, but there are no sinks, showers or drinking water. The harbor entrance at low tide is approximately four feet deep. Pets, with the exception of service animals as defined by the ADA, are not permitted on the island or boats in the harbor. Camping Fees 35.00 $35 per night including boat docking, $25 per night for tenting only. Download the free Recreation.gov app to pay your fees upon arrival using your mobile phone and Scan & Pay. Any vessel in the harbor after 5 pm is considered an overnight stay. Tenting fees are for a maximum of six people and two tents. Seniors with a valid America the Beautiful – The National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Senior Pass receive a 50% discount on fees. Boca Chita Lighthouse Stone lighthouse with glass dome stands at the mouth of the harbor The iconic lighthouse stands watch at the mouth of the Boca Chita harbor Elliott Key Campground Elliott Key campground is located on an island. The only access is by boat. Elliott Key features waterside and partially forested camping areas, picnic tables, and grills. Restrooms with sinks and cold water showers are available. A mile-long loop hiking trail starts near the campground. Another walking trail, the infamous "Spite Highway" runs approximately six miles down the center of the island. At low tide, the depth of the entrance to the marina is approximately 2 1/2 feet. Camping Fees 35.00 $35 per night including boat docking, $25 per night for tenting only. Download the free Recreation.gov app to pay your fees upon arrival using your mobile phone and Scan & Pay. Any vessel in the harbor after 5 pm is considered an overnight stay. Tenting fees are for a maximum of six people and two tents. Seniors with a valid America the Beautiful – The National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Senior Pass receive a 50% discount on fees. Sunset from Elliott Key Golden orange sunset mirrored in the calm waters of the bay Watch spectacular sunsets from the shoreline at Elliott Key Snorkeling Coral reef with two snorkelers diving below the surface Snorkeling is a great way to explore the coral reefs in the park Boca Chita Key Downtown Miami in background. Boca Chita Key is the park's most popular island destination. Coral Reef Underwater view of coral reef with a large school of yellow and blue fish The coral reef is home to many species of fish Coral Reef The coral reefs are located mostly on the Eastern side of the park. Biscayne National Park is 95% water. Green sea turtle Green sea turtle Loggerhead, Green and Hawksbill turtles are all commonly observed in park waters. Totten Key Aerial view of Totten Key. Biscayne National Park includes the northernmost Florida Keys. Partnerships add a Charge to your Travel Plans The National Park Service, the National Park Foundation, BMW of North America, the U.S. Department of Energy, concessioners, and gateway communities have collaborated to provide new technologies for travel options to and around national parks. As part of this public-private partnership, BMW of North America, working through the National Park Foundation, donated and arranged for the installation of 100 electric vehicle (EV) charging ports in and around national parks. 2013 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service More than 200,000 volunteers provide invaluable time and energy to the National Park Service. Meet the people and groups being honored with a 2013 Hartzog Award. Group of cleanup volunteers with full trash bags Sea-level rise and inundation scenarios for national parks in South Florida A review of the science leads researchers to project sea level rise and inundation, trends in the frequency of nuisance flooding, recurrence intervals of storm surge, and impacts on infrastructure intended to provide useful information for managers and planners. Median RCP8.5 mean sea-level elevation projections for Everglades and Biscayne; NPS/Everglades NP Spiny Lobster Reserves Spiny lobsters (Panulirus argus) are keystone predators that, by preying on other carnivorous invertebrates in the reef ecosystem, control populations and mediate competition among prey species. The removal of this species thus reduces the biodiversity and resilience of the entire system. Spiny lobster observed from above ocean floor. Science at Sea in the Gulf of Mexico Science at Sea - Follow along as a research cruise makes its way around the Gulf of Mexico and collects water samples from 4 national parks. ocean view of Florida Bay NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Biscayne National Park, Florida Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] stilt building on the bay Crystal Clear: Baseline Aquatic Contamination and Endocrine Status in Resident Fish Populations of Biscayne National Park and Adjacent Coastal Wetlands A component of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan is rehydration of the coastal wetlands adjacent to Biscayne National Park. Before the planned rehydration of the wetlands begins, park managers need to understand the threats to the park’s resources from existing organic wastewater contaminant (OWC) levels in order to differentiate them from potential impacts from OWCs introduced by the rehydration. coral reef with bight yellow fish Solving the Mystery of the English China Wreck More than 40 shipwrecks are located within the waters which now make up Biscayne NP in southern Florida. Among those wrecks, the English China Wreck is one of the best preserved. Unfortunately, looting and unintended damage caused by fishing and diving threaten the site's integrity and artifacts. These threats, along with a search for proof of the ship's identity, led the NPS and partner George Washington University to conduct field excavations during the summer of 2011. [photo] Overhead view of two divers at work on the sea floor. Boating in Apostle Islands National Lakeshore The 21 Apostle Islands of Lake Superior host a unique blend of cultural and natural resources, and have long been a hub for boaters and sailors. By boat, you can see intriguing sea stacks, rugged sea caves, old lighthouses, and native wildlife. Permeable Docks at Biscayne National Park Biscayne National Park facilities managers upgraded park docks to more sustainable models, supporting sea grass growth and water flow. A view of Biscayne National Park Partners Work to Bring Back Endangered Schaus Swallowtail The Schaus swallowtail has been listed under the Endangered Species Act since April 28, 1976. Its risk of extinction is very high. That’s why a large group of partners in the Imperiled Butterfly Work Group work hard to increase the numbers of the Schaus swallowtail. butterfly rests on tree branch Snoopy One Blimp Provides Natural Resource Monitoring at Biscayne MetLife’s airship Snoopy One, helps NPS researchers study colony-nesting bird activity. They are comparing the results from approaching by a blimp airship versus by helicopter. lighthouse by the shore National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Crystal Clear: A Call to Action In 2016, the nation celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS) as the steward of special places that represent our natural and cultural heritage. Many national parks were founded on the beauty and value of water. Since the preservation of the Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in 1872, the National Park System has grown to include significant examples within majestic rivers, the Great Lakes, oceans and coasts, and other spectacular water resources. bright blue lake green islands in between Data Manager Profile: Judd Patterson Meet Judd Patterson, Data Manager for the South Florida Caribbean Network. As a data manager, helps wrangle all the information that we collect on the health of our park resources. Judd is excited about the stories data can tell through time, whether that's looking back at park records from over a hundred years ago, or making sure the science we do in our parks today become time capsules for future generations to learn about how things were back in 2021. Data manager Judd Patterson smiles at the camera while holding camera equiment. Connecting Fire, Connecting Conservation Fire burns across south Florida in a landscape level prescribed fire operation. Fire burns and smoke billows across south Florida landscape Wounded American Veterans Experience SCUBA Project July 2021 Five female veterans of the US Armed Services joined the National Park Service for a week of removing marine debris from Biscayne National Park, July 5-11, 2021. The veterans were sponsored by the Wounded American Veterans Experience SCUBA Project (WAVES), non-profit established to provide opportunities for veterans with service-connected disabilities and their families to experience scuba diving. Group of WAVES divers on a dock Not on an Even Keel: HMS Fowey Archeological investigation of the HMS Fowey, located in Biscayne NP, documented the surviving portions of the wreck developed a stabilization plan to preserve the site in situ, and resulted in an international agreement formally establishing the NPS as the custodian of the wreck. Multi-disciplinary research explored, developed, and implemented new management strategies to preserve the archeological remains of HMS Fowey. From Puerto Rico to Florida: My Summer With The National Park Service Meet Andrés L. Pérez Cintrón, who is working as a Fisheries Resource Assistant at Biscayne National Park as a Mosaics in Science Intern. Learn about what goes into doing recreational creel surveys (angler surveys) as well as why they are important; and why he thinks it's vital to have more Latinx youth in the science and conservation fields, working at the National Park Service. man standing on the sand looking at the sea Archeological Site Stewardship and International Cooperation in the NPS A 2013 archeological investigation of the HMS Fowey, located in Biscayne NP, documented the surviving portions of the wreck developed a stabilization plan to preserve the site in situ, and resulted in an international agreement formally establishing the NPS as the custodian of the wreck. These presentations focus on the multi-disciplinary research effort to explore, develop, and implement new management strategies to preserve the archeological remains of HMS Fowey. In Situ Site Stabilization of HMS Fowey A 2013 archeological investigation of the HMS Fowey, located in Biscayne NP, documented the surviving portions of the wreck developed a stabilization plan to preserve the site in situ, and resulted in an international agreement formally establishing the NPS as the custodian of the wreck. These presentations focus on the multi-disciplinary research effort to explore, develop, and implement new management strategies to preserve the archeological remains of HMS Fowey. Teen SCUBAnauts Partner with Biscayne National Park for a Three Day Stewardship Visit Four teenaged divers from the North Carolina chapter of SCUBAnauts International partnered with Biscayne National Park for a three-day marine stewardship visit from October 6-8, 2021 Group photo of four teens and two adults Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Dare to Imagine: Dr. Vanessa McDonough Dr. Vanessa McDonough's marine debris removal work goes way beyond simply picking up trash. Her work helps us better understand the impacts of debris on wildlife and habitat. She also helps engage the public to get them to care about something that is eight miles from the mainland or deep below the ocean's surface. This article is part of Dare to Imagine, a National Park Foundation grant-funded project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who are breaking barriers. graphic of a woman in uniform text reads Dr. Vanessay Wildlife Biologist, Biscayne The Resource Stewardship Scout Ranger Program Brings BSA Scouts and National Parks Together To connect more youth to their local communities, NPS created the Resource Stewardship Scout Ranger Program in partnership with the Boy Scouts of America, which welcomes boys, girls, and young adults to participate. Through this program, BSA Scouts and Cub Scouts can earn award certificates and may also receive a patch. Learn more in this article. William Kai, a Cub Scout, holds up his Resource Stewardship Scout Ranger Certificate Award Pollinators in peril? A multipark approach to evaluating bee communities in habitats vulnerable to effects from climate change Can you name five bees in your park? Ten? Twenty? Will they all be there 50 years from now? We know that pollinators are key to maintaining healthy ecosystems—from managed almond orchards to wild mountain meadows. We have heard about dramatic population declines of the agricultural workhorse, the honey bee. Yet what do we really know about the remarkable diversity and resilience of native bees in our national parks? Southeastern polyester bee, Colletes titusensis.

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