"Angel Falls Rapids" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Big South Fork

National River & Recreation Area - KY, TN

The Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area preserves the Big South Fork of the Cumberland River and its tributaries in northeastern Tennessee and southeastern Kentucky. In addition, the former mining community of Blue Heron is preserved and interpreted via signage. The Big South Fork region contains one of the highest concentrations of natural bridges in the eastern United States and the area is located in parts of Scott, Fentress, Pickett, and Morgan counties in Tennessee, and McCreary County in Kentucky. Charit Creek Lodge is a wilderness lodge, accessible by trail, located within the park.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area (NR & RA) in Kentucky and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Big South Fork - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area (NR & RA) in Kentucky and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/biso/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_South_Fork_National_River_and_Recreation_Area The Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area preserves the Big South Fork of the Cumberland River and its tributaries in northeastern Tennessee and southeastern Kentucky. In addition, the former mining community of Blue Heron is preserved and interpreted via signage. The Big South Fork region contains one of the highest concentrations of natural bridges in the eastern United States and the area is located in parts of Scott, Fentress, Pickett, and Morgan counties in Tennessee, and McCreary County in Kentucky. Charit Creek Lodge is a wilderness lodge, accessible by trail, located within the park. Encompassing 125,000 acres of the Cumberland Plateau, Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area protects the free-flowing Big South Fork of the Cumberland River and its tributaries. The area boasts miles of scenic gorges and sandstone bluffs, is rich with natural and historic features and has been developed to provide visitors with a wide range of outdoor recreational activities. Please use the following link to learn more about how to get here from various locations. Bandy Creek Visitor Center Exhibits Focus on the recreational opportunities found within Big South Fork and throughout the seven surrounding counties. Facilities & Activities Ask a ranger what to do in the park. free public WiFi, bookstore; park permits; restrooms; vending machines, and ice sales. Adjacent to Bandy Creek Campground; approximately 15 miles west of Oneida and 24 miles east of Jamestown, off Highway 297. Blue Heron Interpretive Center Exhibits The Blue Heron Mining Community can be visited at any time to view historic structures and listen to audio programs. Facilities & Activities Ask a ranger what to do in the park; free public WiFi, bookstore; park permits; restrooms; vending machines, and concession stand. Railroad Ride The Big South Fork Scenic Railway travels from the Stearns Depot to the Blue Heron Mining Community in a 45-minute trip. The train remains approximately an hour at Blue Heron before returning to Stearns. Location: Located via Highways 1651 and 742. Crossville Visitor Center Located in Crossville, just off Exit 320, on I-40, across from Stone Memorial High School. Location: Crossville, just off Exit 320, on I-40, across from Stone Memorial High School. Helenwood Visitor Center Facilities & Activities Ask a ranger what to do in the park; free public WiFi; restrooms. Location: Located via Highways 1651 and 742. Rugby Visitor Contact Station Facilities & Activities Ask a ranger what to do in the park; free public WiFi, restrooms; park permits. Location: Rugby, off Highway 52, approximately 17 miles west of Jamestown, Tennessee. Stearns Visitor Contact Station Facilities Ask a ranger what to do in the park; restrooms; park permits. Location: Stearns, approximately 0.25 of a mile west of Highway 27, just off Highway 92. Also located three miles south of Whitley City, and 18 miles north of Oneida, Tennessee. Alum Ford Campground Alum Ford is a primitive campground and offers six campsites with a vault toilet facility. No drinking water is located at this area. Alum Ford also has a boat ramp. There are no fees to use the ramp. Campsite Fee 5.00 This fee is for one night of camping for up to six persons per site. Holders of the Interagency Access/Senior Passport pay only half the fee per night. Campsite at Alum Ford Campground Campsite with leaves and picnic table One of the few areas where visitors can camp near the river. Bandy Creek Campground The campground offers a total of 181 campsites: 96 trailer sites which offer water and electric hook-ups, 49 sites for tent camping, and two group camping loops with 19 sites in one loop and 16 sites in the other. All campsites include picnic tables, fire rings, and access to restrooms and showers. A dump station is located near the registration kiosk. There are no sewer hook-ups at individual trailer sites. The group campsites also have their own cook shelters and campfire circles. Campsites with Water and 50-amp Electric Hook-up 32.00 This fee applies to all sites with 50-amp service within loops B, C, and D. Sites without Electric 20.00 This fee applies to sites within loop A. Group Camp 125.00 This fee applies for up to 25 persons per night. An additional $3.00 per night per person is required for more than 25 persons. Campsites with Water and 30-amp Electric Hook-up 25.00 This fee applies to all sites with 30-amp service within loops B, C, and D. Campsite at Bandy Creek pop up camper and truck on a campsite Campers enjoy a beautiful day in the park. Bear Creek Horse Camp This campground contains 23 developed campsites. Each site offers water and electricity, tables, grills, tie-outs for 4 horses, access to modern restrooms with hot showers, a dump station and access miles of horse trails. Bear Creek Horse Camp is located on Bear Creek Road off Hwy. 742, west of Stearns, Kentucky. The fee rate per night is $28.00 (half price for holders of the Interagency Access/Senior Passes). Campsite Fee 28.00 This fee covers one night of camping for up to six persons per site. Holders of the Interagency Access/Senior Passports pay only half the fee. Campsite at Bear Creek Horse Camp campsite located near the entrance of campground This campground provides access to one of many horse trails in the park. Bear Creek Horse Campsite A picnic table sits under a tree next to a campsite pad. Bear Creek Horse Camp Blue Heron Campground Blue Heron Campground is located in the Kentucky portion of Big South Fork, 9 miles west of Stearns off Highway 742. The campground offers a total of 45 sites all with water and electric hook-ups, picnic tables, fire-rings, access to restrooms and showers and a dump station. Camping Fee 20.00 This fee covers one night of camping for up to 6 persons. RV camper on site at Blue Heron Red truck with RV camper on campsite Campers enjoy the serenity of the campground. Station Camp Campground This campground contains 24 developed campsites. Each site offers water and electricity, tables, grills, tie-outs for 4 horses, access to modern restrooms with hot showers, a dump station and access miles of horse trails. Station Camp Campground is located on station Camp Road approximately 4.5 miles from the intersection of Coopertown Road and Leatherwood Road . The fee rate per night is $28.00 (half price for holders of the Interagency Access/Senior Passes). Campsite Fee 28.00 This fee covers one night of camping for up to six persons per site. Holders of the Interagency Access/Senior Passports pay only half the fee. Station Camp Campground A large black RV is parked next to tent pad with picnic table. Station Camp Campground Big South Fork NRRA in Fall Big South Fork NRRA in Fall Big South Fork NRRA in Fall Big South Fork Annual Spring Planting and Music Festival Celebrate the return of spring at the annual Spring Planting and Music Festival at Big South Fork National River and Recreational Area. The skills and traditions that sustained families in the region during the late 1800s and early 1900s were closely tied to the environment. Today, the connection between the landscape and local lifeways survives in the resources at Big South Fork, and the annual festival provides opportunities to explore the role of these traditions. A team of three draft horses pulls a plow through an unplanted field. Cultural Landscapes by Bicycle There are many ways to experience national parks by bicycle, with route options for all levels of experience and preference. Here are just three examples of ways to explore park cultural landscapes by bike in the southeastern part of the United States. Ride a loop road through an agricultural community in a fertile valley, follow the path of a former railroad that once brought tourists to Mammoth Cave, or travel mountain bike trails to a farmstead from the late 1800s. Two people with bikes gaze over a valley filled with fog, with blue mountains in the background. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Big South Fork National River & Recreation Area, Kentucky and Tennessee Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] boulders and river at angel falls rapids Lora Blevins Farmstead Cultural Landscape The Lora Blevins Farmstead is typical of the settlement patterns found throughout the Big South Fork plateau in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. A number of historical landscape features still exist at the site, including fields, fruit and nut trees, hedgerows, road traces, fences, foundations, an animal pen, and a cemetery. A wood farm building on the Blevins Farmstead stands at the edge of a grassy field. Parch Corn Creek Farmstead Cultural Landscape Parch Corn Creek Farmstead is a part of the proposed Big South Fork Rural Historic District. The Big South Fork Rural Historic District is significant at the state level for its association with the early settlement, agriculture and rural community life, and economy of the Upper Cumberland region in Tennessee. Parch Corn (Blevins/Litton) Cabin - late 20th century (P.C.C. Farmstead: CLI, NPS, 1998) Charles Rudy Slaven/John Litton Farmstead Cultural Landscape The Charles Rudy Slaven/John Litton Homestead is a 184 acre landscape located on the North Fork of the Fall Branch in Scott County, Tennessee. The diverse resources of the district are united historically by their association with farming activity and rural life in the Upper Cumberland from 1821 to 1950. The district is significant in the areas of agriculture, architecture, archaeology, community planning and development, exploration and settlement, and industry. John Litton barn (Charles Rudy Slaven/John Litton Farmstead: CLI, NPS, 1998) Oscar Blevins Farmstead Cultural Landscape The Oscar Blevins Farmstead is a part of the proposed Big South Fork Rural Historic District. Due mostly to the Basin’s naturally confining physiography, a historic lack of any developed road system, and the existence of only narrow parcels of arable floodplain, the rural landscapes that developed here, as elsewhere in the Upper Cumberland, were unique in how they displayed the intimate and relationship between land and people. Original cabin on Oscar Blevins Farmstead (NPS) Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Pennsylvanian Period—323.2 to 298.9 MYA Rocks in Cumberland Gap National Historical Park represent vast Pennsylvanian-age swamps. Plant life in those swamps later became coal found in the eastern United States. fossil tracks on sandstone slab Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix

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