"Moss-covered canopy, Big Thicket National Preserve, 2015." by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Big Thicket

National Preserve - Texas

Big Thicket is the name of a heavily forested area in Southeast Texas, United States. Several attempts to provide boundaries have been made ranging from only a 10 to 15 mile section of Hardin County to an area encompassing over 29 counties and over 3,350,000 acres. While no exact boundaries exist, the area occupies much of Hardin, Liberty, Tyler, San Jacinto, and Polk Counties and is roughly bounded by the San Jacinto River, Neches River, and Pine Island Bayou. To the north, it blends into the larger Piney Woods terrestrial ecoregion of which it is a part. It has historically been the most dense forest region in what is now Texas, though logging in the 19th and 20th centuries dramatically reduced the forest concentration.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Big Thicket National Preserve (NPRES) in Texas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Big Thicket - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Big Thicket National Preserve (NPRES) in Texas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Trails Map of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).Trinity River - Trails Map

Trails Map of Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Texas. Published by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS).

https://www.nps.gov/bith/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Thicket Big Thicket is the name of a heavily forested area in Southeast Texas, United States. Several attempts to provide boundaries have been made ranging from only a 10 to 15 mile section of Hardin County to an area encompassing over 29 counties and over 3,350,000 acres. While no exact boundaries exist, the area occupies much of Hardin, Liberty, Tyler, San Jacinto, and Polk Counties and is roughly bounded by the San Jacinto River, Neches River, and Pine Island Bayou. To the north, it blends into the larger Piney Woods terrestrial ecoregion of which it is a part. It has historically been the most dense forest region in what is now Texas, though logging in the 19th and 20th centuries dramatically reduced the forest concentration. Life of all types abounds in the Big Thicket. This national preserve protects the incredible diversity of life found where multiple habitats converge in southeast Texas. Hiking trails and waterways meander through nine different ecosystems, from longleaf pine forests to cypress-lined bayous. It is a place of discovery, a place to wander and explore, a place to marvel at the richness of nature. The main corridor through the Big Thicket is US 69/287 between Beaumont and Woodville. Many smaller roads and highways branch off of the main corridor to reach trailheads and scenic areas. The visitor center is located at the intersection of US 69/287 and FM 420, about 8 miles north of Kountze and 30 miles north of Beaumont. Big Thicket Visitor Center Start your trip here! Get free maps and information, meet a park ranger, and learn about the Big Thicket's plants, animals, and history. Staying awhile? Watch a short film in the theater, browse the bookstore, and enjoy a picnic in the covered picnic area. The visitor center is located approximately 30 miles north of Beaumont, and 7 miles north of Kountze, at the intersection of US 69/287 and FM 420. No developed campgrounds in the preserve There are no developed campgrounds or backcountry campsites within Big Thicket National Preserve. The preserve issues free camping permits for backpackers. Boaters may get camping permits to camp on sandbars. There are several private and state park camping facilities in the local area. Big Thicket Swamp green swamp with cypress trees, cypress knees, palmetto, and a thick canopy Stubby cypress "knees" grow alongside their parent trees in cypress sloughs. Pitcher Plants A dense stand of funnel-shaped carnivorous pitcher plants awaiting their next insect meal. Look for carnivorous pitcher plants in bogs along the Sundew Trail and Pitcher Plant Trail. Paddling Village Creek 2 people in a canoe paddling down a river Explore the Big Thicket's waterways on a canoe or kayak. Armadillo An armadillo looking up from its digging in a field of grass and leaves Armadillos dig in the ground to look for nutritious insects. Cypress Tree Trunks a grouping of wide-buttressed bald cypress tree trunks growing out of a green, murky swamp Wide, fluted trunks are a characteristic of the bald cypress tree. Staley Cabin A log cabin with metal roof in a forest Historic Staley Cabin sits at the start of the Kirby Nature Trail. Kirby Nature Trail Bridge small wooden bridge in the forest Small wooden bridges guide hikers across waterways on the Kirby Nature Trail. Palmettos palmetto plants growing in the forest Dwarf palmettos grow in the Big Thicket's palmetto hardwood flats. Green Anole close up of a green anole lizard on a fence Green anoles are commonly seen climbing on trees and wooden bridges. Longleaf Pines a stand of young longleaf pines growing near each other These young longleaf pines are the result of a multi-year habitat restoration project. Village Creek Bridge a metal bridge spanning Village Creek, with a cypress tree growing out of the water in front of it This footbridge over Village Creek connects the Kirby and Turkey Creek trails. Sundew Trail A wooden boardwalk meanders through a field of ferns and pine trees. Explore a wetland pine savannah on the Sundew Trail. Excellence in Wildland Fire Management In February 2015, the Fire Management team at Big Thicket National Preserve was recognized for their hard work and ability to maintain a high standard of excellence. Wildland fire operations at Big Thicket National Preserve ProRanger San Antonio Cadets Prepare for Wildland Fire Big Thicket National Preserve hosted ProRanger San Antonio on March 12-14, 2012 for wildland firefighter training in the Piney Woods forests of East Texas. The ProRanger second-year cadets participated in an eight-hour classroom refresher focused on risk management and fire preparedness. ProRanger is a career development program focused on creating new pathways for students into the National Park Service (NPS). Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Big Thicket National Preserve, Texas Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] bald cypress trees reflected in water Top 10 Tips for Visiting Big Thicket Are you planning a trip to Big Thicket National Preserve? Check out these 10 tips to make your trip a fun and safe one! kayaker paddling past cypress trees on a sunny waterway Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background

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